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Integration of torrefaction in CHP plants - A case study
Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.
Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-9508-1733
Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-6279-4446
Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-9230-1596
2015 (English)In: Energy Conversion and Management, ISSN 0196-8904, E-ISSN 1879-2227, Vol. 90, 427-435 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Torrefied biomass shows characteristics that resemble those of coal. Therefore, torrefied biomass can be co-combusted with coal in existing coal mills and burners. This paper presents simulation results of a case study where a torrefaction reactor was integrated in an existing combined heat and power plant and sized to replace 25%, 50%, 75% or 100% of the fossil coal in one of the boilers. The simulations show that a torrefaction reactor can be integrated with existing plants without compromising heat or electricity production. Economic and sensitivity analysis show that the additional cost for integrating a torrefaction reactor is low which means that with an emission allowance cost of 37 €/ton CO2, the proposed integrated system can be profitable and use 100% renewable fuels. The development of subsidies will affect the process economy. The determinant parameters are electricity and fuel prices.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 90, 427-435 p.
Keyword [en]
Biomass, Combined heat and power (CHP), District heating, Polygeneration, Torrefaction, Carbon dioxide, Coal, Cost benefit analysis, Costs, Sensitivity analysis, Additional costs, Combined heat and power, Combined heat and power plants, Electricity production, Emission allowances, Integrated systems, Poly-generation, Cogeneration plants
National Category
Energy Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-26943DOI: 10.1016/j.enconman.2014.11.019ISI: 000348886800040Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84915745084OAI: oai:DiVA.org:mdh-26943DiVA: diva2:773484
Available from: 2014-12-19 Created: 2014-12-19 Last updated: 2015-07-06Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. From Combined Heat and Power to Polygeneration
Open this publication in new window or tab >>From Combined Heat and Power to Polygeneration
2015 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

In order to reach targets on reducing greenhouse gas emissions from fossil resources it is necessary to reduce energy losses in production processes. In polygeneration, several processes are combined to complement each other to avoid sub-optimization of the standalone processes. This thesis addresses polygeneration with focus on Combined Heat and Power (CHP) production integrated with other processes. Biomass-fired CHP plants are commonly dimensioned to have surplus heat production capacity during periods with lower heat demand. At the same time, production of biomass based vehicle fuels and fuel upgrading are heat demanding processes. The opportunity to combine CHP with ethanol production from lignocellulosic feedstock and torrefaction with the aim of replacing fossil fuels are used as cases during the evaluation of polygeneration. Simulation models are used to investigate the performance of CHP integrated with production of ethanol and torrefaction. Measured data from commercial CHP plants have been used to reflect the operation boundaries. The findings show that polygeneration can compete with stand-alone production in both energy and economic performance. Polygeneration offers a wider operating range where reduced minimum load gives increased annual operating time. Therefore, under limited heat demand more renewable electricity production is possible due to increased operating hours and steam extraction from the turbine during part-load operation. Resource availability and fluctuations in fuel price have the largest impact on the profit of polygeneration. Other aspects that have substantial effects on the economy in polygeneration are the electricity spot price and subsidies. Furthermore, it has been proven that the yield of each product in a multiproduct process plant, the size of the plant and the heat demand have a large impact on the economy. Polygeneration turns by-products into buy-products.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Västerås: Mälardalen University, 2015
Series
Mälardalen University Press Dissertations, ISSN 1651-4238 ; 181
National Category
Mechanical Engineering
Research subject
Energy- and Environmental Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-28442 (URN)978-91-7485-221-9 (ISBN)
Public defence
2015-09-02, Paros, Mälardalens högskola, Västerås, 13:15 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2015-07-06 Created: 2015-06-23 Last updated: 2015-08-24Bibliographically approved

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