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Women with Breast Cancer: Experience of Chemotherapy-Induced Pain - Triangulation of Methods
Uppsala University, Sweden.
Uppsala University, Sweden.
Uppsala University, Sweden.
Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare. (Personcentrerad vård och kommunikation)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4302-5529
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2015 (English)In: Cancer Nursing, ISSN 0162-220X, E-ISSN 1538-9804, Vol. 38, no 1, 31-39 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Chemotherapy treatment for cancer diseases can cause body pain during adjuvant therapy. OBJECTIVE: The aim was to describe the perceived impact of adjuvant chemotherapy-induced pain (CHIP) on the daily lives of women with newly diagnosed breast cancer, using triangulation. METHOD: Fifty-seven women scheduled for chemotherapy in doses of 75 mg/m or greater of epirubicin and/or docetaxel participated. Twenty-two of these women registered pain with values of 4 or more on the visual analog scale on day 10 following chemotherapy. Of these 22, 16 participated in an interview and colored a printed body image. A qualitative thematic stepwise analysis of the interviews was performed. RESULTS: Chemotherapy-induced pain had a profound impact on daily life. Ten women reported the worst possible pain, with visual analog scale scores of 8 to 10. Three different categories crystallized: perception (A) of manageable pain, which allowed the women to maintain their daily lives; perception (B) of pain beyond imagination, whereby the impact of pain had become more complex; and perception (C) of crippling pain, challenging the women's confidence in survival. CONCLUSIONS: The findings highlight the inability to capture CHIP with 1 method only; it is thus necessary to use complimentary methods to capture pain. We found that pain had a considerable impact on daily life, with surprisingly high scores of perceived pain, findings that to date have been poorly investigated qualitatively. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: Nurses need to (1) better identify, understand and treat CHIP, using instruments and protocols; and (2) provide improved communication about pain and pain management.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 38, no 1, 31-39 p.
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-26564DOI: 10.1097/NCC.0000000000000124ISI: 000346161400010Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84918535609OAI: oai:DiVA.org:mdh-26564DiVA: diva2:764086
Available from: 2014-11-18 Created: 2014-11-18 Last updated: 2016-04-20Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
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  • Other style
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Language
  • de-DE
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