mdh.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Work Conditions, Recovery and Health: A Study among Workers within Pre-School, Home Care and Social Work
Stockholm Univ, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden .
Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare. Stockholm Univ, Dept Psychol, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden .ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7405-0025
Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Div Insurance Med, Stockholm, Sweden.
2014 (English)In: British Journal of Social Work, ISSN 0045-3102, E-ISSN 1468-263X, Vol. 44, no 6, 1654-1672 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The study investigated the working conditions associated with the accumulation of stress and lack of recovery and how recovery is related to health. The study group was employed in pre-school, home care and social work (n = 193). Recovery was assumed to be an explanatory variable for the relations between work and health. The response rate on a survey was 79 per cent. Cluster analysis identified three groups: the 'Recovered' (36 per cent of the total group) and 'Not Recovered' (25 per cent) and the 'In-between' (39 per cent). The Not Recovered displayed the whole chain of risk factors, involving difficult working conditions to which they responded with increased compensatory strategies. Despite this group having significantly greater reports of ill health, work absenteeism was not greater, which is likely related to their substituting sickness absence with sickness presence. As many as 43 per cent of the social workers were found to belong to the Not Recovered group. Multiple regression analyses controlling for background variables revealed that the Not Recovered group had a significantly higher relative risk for poor self-rated health than those in the Recovered group. Even sharper increases in relative risk existed for the other five symptoms that were analysed. Practical implications and new research questions are discussed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014. Vol. 44, no 6, 1654-1672 p.
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-26483DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bct036ISI: 000342988900018OAI: oai:DiVA.org:mdh-26483DiVA: diva2:761564
Available from: 2014-11-07 Created: 2014-11-07 Last updated: 2014-11-14Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Astvik, Wanja
By organisation
Health and Welfare
In the same journal
British Journal of Social Work
Health Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Altmetric score

Total: 130 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf