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The role of regulatory reforms, market changes, and technology development to make demand response a viable resource in meeting energy challenges
Environmental Energy Technologies Divisions, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, United States .
Environmental Energy Technologies Divisions, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, United States .
Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center. CLASP China, Beijing, China .
Environmental Energy Technologies Divisions, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, United States .
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2014 (English)In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, Vol. 130, p. 814-823Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In recent years, demand response and load control automation has gained increased attention from regulators, system operators, utilities, market aggregators, and product vendors. It has become a cost-effective demand-side alternative to traditional supply-side generation technologies to balance the power grid, enable grid integration of renewable energy, and meet growing demands for electricity. There are several factors that have played a role in the development of demand response programs. Existing research are however limited on reviewing in a systematic approach how these factors work together to drive this development. This paper makes an attempt to fill this gap. It provides a comprehensive overview on how policy and regulations, electricity market reform, and technological advancement in the US and other countries have worked for demand response to become a viable demand-side resource to address the energy and environmental challenges. The paper also offers specific recommendations on actions needed to capture untapped demand response potentials in countries that have developed active demand response programs as well as countries that plan to pursue demand response.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014. Vol. 130, p. 814-823
Keywords [en]
Demand response, Demand-side resources, Electricity load management, Grid integration, Smart grid, Environmental regulations, Demand-side, Electricity load, Commerce
National Category
Energy Systems
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-25763DOI: 10.1016/j.apenergy.2013.12.069ISI: 000340311500083Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84904725008OAI: oai:DiVA.org:mdh-25763DiVA, id: diva2:736773
Available from: 2014-08-08 Created: 2014-08-08 Last updated: 2018-01-03Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf