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Work-related health factors among female immigrants in Sweden
Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare. National Institute for Working Life, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-9059-599X
National Institute for Working Life, Sweden.
National Institute for Working Life, Sweden.
2007 (English)In: WORK – A Journal of Prevention, Assessment and Rehabilitation, ISSN 1051-9815, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 135-144Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Work-related health has been a focus of research since the rate of sickness-related absences began to increase in Sweden. The incidence of sickness-related absences and early retirement is higher among female immigrants than among others in the total population. This study is based on a questionnaire survey which was conducted in a municipality in Sweden. The study population consisted of 2 429 native and immigrant female employees. The aim was to study work-related health factors for female immigrants. The results of this study show that about 20% of female immigrants who participate in the survey have temporary employment while the proportion is 8% for native women. The perception of ethnic discrimination among female immigrants was three times as much as among native females. The results also show that 69% of female immigrants report having received no opportunity to discuss their wages with managers, in comparison to 63% of native females. About 40% of female immigrants and 35% of native women report that they do not get opportunities to upgrade their skills. Female immigrants over the age of 50 experience gender and ethnic discrimination and lack of access to skills training programs more often than younger immigrants. They also participate in health-care activities more often.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2007. Vol. 28, no 2, p. 135-144
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-24200PubMedID: 17312345OAI: oai:DiVA.org:mdh-24200DiVA, id: diva2:687993
Available from: 2014-01-15 Created: 2014-01-15 Last updated: 2015-06-02Bibliographically approved

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Akhavan, Sharareh

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