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Engagement in family activities: A quantitative, comparative study of children with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities and children with typical development
Hälsohögskolan i Jönköping. (CHILD)
Hälsohögskolan i Jönköping. (CHILD)
Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication. Hälsohögskolan i Jönköping. (CHILD)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-9273-2203
2013 (English)In: Child Care Health and Development, ISSN 0305-1862, E-ISSN 1365-2214, Vol. 39, no 4, 523-534 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Participation is known to be of great importance for children's development and emotional well-being as well as for their families. In the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health - Children and Youth version participation is defined as a person's 'involvement in a life situation'. Engagement is closely related to involvement and can be seen as expressions of involvement or degree of involvement within a situation. This study focuses on children's engagement in family activities; one group of families with a child with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD) and one group of families with children with typical development (TD) were compared. Methods: A descriptive study using questionnaires. Analyses were mainly performed by using Mann-Whitney U-test and Spearman's rank correlation test. Results: Engagement in family activities differed in the two groups of children. The children with PIMD had a lower level of engagement in most family activities even though the activities that engaged the children to a higher or lesser extent were the same in both groups. Child engagement was found to correlate with family characteristics mostly in the children with TD and in the children with PIMD only negative correlations occurred. In the children with PIMD child engagement correlated with cognition in a high number of listed family activities and the children had a low engagement in routines in spite of these being frequently occurring activities. Conclusions: Level of engagement in family activities in the group of children with PIMD was lower compared with that in the group of children with TD. Families with a child with PIMD spend much time and effort to adapt family living patterns to the child's functioning

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013. Vol. 39, no 4, 523-534 p.
National Category
Psychology Educational Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-21607DOI: 10.1111/cch.12044ISI: 000320389000009Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84879154725OAI: oai:DiVA.org:mdh-21607DiVA: diva2:650158
Available from: 2013-09-20 Created: 2013-09-20 Last updated: 2014-06-13Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
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  • asciidoc
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