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Perceptions of gain following spinal cord injury: A qualitative analysis
University of Oxford.
Swiss Paraplegic Research and Swiss Paraplegic Centre, Nottwil, Switzerland .
Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-5098-8489
Department of Clinical Psychology, National Spinal Injuries Centre, Stoke Mandeville Hospital.
2013 (English)In: Topics in Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation, Vol. 19, no 3, 202-210 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Significant research has focused on psychological difficulties following spinal cord injury (SCI), and there is a small prevalence of individuals who experience distress after injury. However, the converse is that many adjust well to injury and rate their quality of life highly. Despite this, there has been a comparative dearth of research investigating positive psychological outcomes after SCI, perceived by individuals living with this disability. Objective: To explore individuals' perceptions of gain following the experience of SCI. Methods: Participants, who had sustained an SCI between the ages 16 and 83, responded to an open-ended written question: "What do you think you have gained from the experience of spinal cord injury?" This was administered at 4 time points post injury: 6 weeks, 12 weeks, 1 year, and 2 years. Results: Participants' responses were analyzed qualitatively using the framework of thematic analysis. Thirteen themes were identified: relationships, appreciation of relationships, perspective and appreciation of life, new goals or priorities, understanding of SCI or disability, appreciation of health or health care, changed personality, opportunity or challenge, knowledge of SCI or body, newly acquired skills, spirituality, acceptance, and nothing. Descriptive statistics were incorporated in the presentation of the data. Conclusions: This study provides evidence that a broad range of positive as well as negative psychological outcomes are possible following SCI. More research is needed to better understand the process through which these outcomes arise and to inform how such outcomes may be communicated to persons experiencing this type of injury.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013. Vol. 19, no 3, 202-210 p.
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-20931DOI: 10.1310/sci1903-202Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84881133995OAI: oai:DiVA.org:mdh-20931DiVA: diva2:641236
Note

Source: Scopus

Available from: 2013-08-16 Created: 2013-08-16 Last updated: 2013-12-19Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
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