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Animal production in a sustainable agriculture
Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
2013 (English)In: Environment, Development and Sustainability, ISSN 1387-585X, E-ISSN 1573-2975, Vol. 15, no 4, 999-1036 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper discusses the role of animal production systems in a sustainable society; sustainability problems within animal production systems; and four measures for the improvement of the contribution to societal sustainability from animal production. Substantial potentials for improvements are identified that were not previously known. The methodological basis is multi-criteria multi-level analysis within integrated assessment where elements in Impredicative Loop Analysis are integrated with management tools in Swedish agriculture and forestry developed during thousands of years, during which the well-being of the Swedish society and its economic and military power were functions of the land-use skill. The issue-the sustainability footprint of global animal production-is complex and available data are limited. The Swedish case is used as a starting point for an analysis of international relevance. Data from FAO and OECD support the relevance of extrapolating results from the Swedish case to level. The four measures are (i) decrease the consumption of chicken meat in developed nations with 2.6 kg per capita and year; (ii) develop the capacity of ruminants to produce high-quality food from otherwise marginal agroecosystems; (iii) improve milk production per cow with a factor four on global level; and (iv) increase feeding efficiency in milk production globally would substantially improve the societal contribution in terms of increased food supply and decreased pressure on land. The impact of measures (i), (iii) and (iv) on increased global food security was estimated to in total 1.8 billion people in terms of protein supply and a decreased pressure on agricultural land of 217 million ha, of which 41 relate to tropical forests. The 41 million ha of tropical land are due to a decreased demand on soymeal, where this represents more than a halving of total area now used for the production of soymeal. These impacts are of the character either or. The quality of the measures is as first-time estimates, supporting choices of where to direct further efforts in analysis. Two areas were identified as critical for achieving this potential: Feeding strategies to dairy cows as well as methods commonly used to evaluate the sustainability contribution of animal production needs adjustment, so that they comply with the "laws" of diminishing returns, Liebig's "law" of the minimum and Shelford's "law" of tolerance, that is, in agreement with well-known principles for efficient natural resource management and the priorities of UN Millennium Development Goals. If not, global food security is at risk. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013. Vol. 15, no 4, 999-1036 p.
Keyword [en]
Agroecosystems, Animal production, Climate change, Food security, Integrative assessment, Sustainable animal production, agricultural ecosystem, alternative agriculture, animal, food supply, integrated approach, livestock farming, meat, OECD, ruminant, sustainability, tolerance, Sweden, Animalia, Bos, Bovidae
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-20816DOI: 10.1007/s10668-012-9423-zScopus ID: 2-s2.0-84879782883OAI: oai:DiVA.org:mdh-20816DiVA: diva2:638815
Available from: 2013-08-02 Created: 2013-08-02 Last updated: 2013-08-02Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Cite
Citation style
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