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Long-term follow-up of a high- and a low-intensity smoking cessation intervention in a dental setting- a randomized trial
Centre for Clinical Research, Uppsala University, Västerås, Sweden.
Karolinska Institutet.
Centre for Clinical Research, Uppsala University, Västerås, Sweden.
Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3787-1040
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2013 (English)In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 13, no 9, Article number: 592- p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Achieving lifelong tobacco abstinence is an important public health goal. Most studies use 1-year follow-ups, but little is known about how good these are as proxies for long-term and life-long abstinence. Also, intervention intensity is an important issue for development of efficient and cost-effective cessation treatment protocols.The study aims were to assess the long-term effectiveness of a high- and a low-intensity treatment (HIT and LIT) for smoking cessation and to analyze to what extent 12-month abstinence predicted long-term abstinence. Methods. 300 smokers attending dental or general health care were randomly assigned to HIT or LIT at the public dental clinic. Main outcome measures were self-reported point prevalence, continuous abstinence (≥6 months), and sustained abstinence. The study was a follow-up after 5-8 years of a previously performed 12-month follow-up, both by postal questionnaires. Results: Response rate was 85% (n=241) of those still alive and living in Sweden. Abstinence rates were 8% higher in both programs at the long-term than at the 12-month follow-up. The difference of 7% between HIT and LIT had not change, being 31% vs. 24% for point prevalence and 26% vs. 19% for 6-month continuous abstinence, respectively. Significantly more participants in HIT (12%) than in LIT (5%) had been sustained abstinent (p=0.03). Logistic regression analyses showed that abstinence at 12-month follow-up was a strong predictor for abstinence at long-term follow-up. Conclusions: Abstinence at 12-month follow-up is a good predictor for long-term abstinence. The difference in outcome between HIT and LIT for smoking cessation remains at least 5-8 years after the intervention. Trial registration number. NCT00670514.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013. Vol. 13, no 9, Article number: 592- p.
Keyword [en]
Health care, Public health, Questionnaire, Tobacco cessation, Treatment intensity
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-20824DOI: 10.1186/1471-2458-13-592ISI: 000320958000001Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84879676145OAI: oai:DiVA.org:mdh-20824DiVA: diva2:638802
Available from: 2013-08-02 Created: 2013-08-02 Last updated: 2014-06-16Bibliographically approved

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Citation style
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