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Emissions of N2O and CH4 from agricultural soils amended with two types of biogas residues
Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology. (MERO)ORCID iD: 0000-0001-5480-0167
SLU.
Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology. (MERO)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-8268-1967
SLU.
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2012 (English)In: Biomass and Bioenergy, ISSN 0961-9534, E-ISSN 1873-2909, Vol. 44, p. 112-116Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Biogas residues contain valuable plant nutrients, important to the crops and also to soil microorganisms. However, application of these materials to the soils may contribute to the emission of greenhouse gases (GHG) causing global warming and climate change. In the present study, incubation experiment was carried out, where the emission rates of N2O and CH4 were measured after amending two soils with two types of biogas residues: (1) a regular residue from a large scale biogas plant (BR) and (2) a residue from an ultrafiltration membrane unit connected to a pilot-scale biogas plant (BRMF). The emissions of N2O and CH4 were measured at two occasions: at 24 h and at 7 days after residue amendment, respectively. Amendment with filtered biogas residues (BRMF) led to an increase in N2O emissions with about 6-23 times in organic and clay soil, respectively, in comparison to unfiltered biogas residues (BR). Methane emission was detected in small amounts when filtered biogas residue was added to the soil. Amendment of unfiltered biogas to the organic soil resulted in net consumption. In conclusion, fertilization with BRMF can be combined with risk of an increase N2O emission, especially when applied to organic soils. However, in order to transfer these results to real life agriculture, large scale field studies need to be carried out

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2012. Vol. 44, p. 112-116
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-17495DOI: 10.1016/j.biombioe.2012.05.006ISI: 000307031900015Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84862750139OAI: oai:DiVA.org:mdh-17495DiVA, id: diva2:580247
Available from: 2012-12-21 Created: 2012-12-21 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved

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Odlare, MonicaLindmark, JohanThorin, EvaNehrenheim, Emma

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