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Influence of indoor air conditions on radon concentration in a detached house
Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology. (MERO)
Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology. (MERO)
Sharif University of Technology, Tehran, Iran.
2013 (English)In: Journal of Environmental Radioactivity, ISSN 0265-931X, E-ISSN 1879-1700, ISSN ISSN 0265-931X, EISSN 1879-1700, Vol. 116, p. 166-173Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Radon is released from soil and building materials and can accumulate in residential buildings. Breathing radon and radon progeny for extended periods hazardous to health and can lead to lung cancer. Indoor air conditions and ventilation systems strongly influence indoor radon concentrations. This paper focuses on effects of air change rate, indoor temperature and relative humidity on indoor radon concentrations in a one family detached house in Stockholm, Sweden.In this study a heat recovery ventilation system unit was used to control the ventilation rate and a continuous radon monitor (CRM) was used to measure radon levels. FLUENT, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software package was used to simulate radon entry into the building and air change rate, indoor temperature and relative humidity effects using a numerical approach.The results from analytical solution, measurements and numerical simulations showed that air change rate, indoor temperature and moisture had significant effects on indoor radon concentration. Increasing air change rate reduces radon level and for a specific air change rate (in this work Ach = 0.5) there was a range of temperature and relative humidity that minimized radon levels. In this case study minimum radon levels were obtained at temperatures between 20 and 22 °C and a relative humidity of 50-60%

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2013. Vol. 116, p. 166-173
Keywords [en]
Numerical modeling, Radon mitigation, Air change rate, Temperature, Relative humidity
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Research subject
Energy- and Environmental Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-16523DOI: 10.1016/j.jenvrad.2012.08.013ISI: 000315005600022PubMedID: 23159846Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84868689205OAI: oai:DiVA.org:mdh-16523DiVA, id: diva2:575868
Projects
Part of PhD thesisAvailable from: 2012-12-12 Created: 2012-12-11 Last updated: 2018-10-16Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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