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Lignocellulosic Ethanol Production Potential and Regional Transportation Fuel Demand
Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology. (MERO)
2011 (English)Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Road traffic dominates in domestic Swedish transportation and is highly dependent on fossil fuels, petrol and diesel. Currently, the use of renewable fuels in transportation accounts for less than 6% of the total energy use in transport. The demand for bioethanol to fuel transportation is growing and cannot be met through current domestic production alone. Lignocellulosic ethanol derived from agricultural crop residues may be a feasible alternative source of ethanol for securing a consistent regional fuel supply in Swedish climatic conditions.

 This licentiate thesis focuses on regional transport fuel supply by considering local small-scale ethanol production from straw. It presents the results of investigations of regional transport fuel supply with respect to minimising regional CO2 emissions, cost estimates for transport fuel supply, and the availability of lignocellulosic resources for small-scale ethanol production. Regional transport fuel demand between the present and 2020 is also estimated. The results presented here show that significant bioethanol can be produced from the straw and Salix available in the studied regions and that this is sufficient to meet the regions’ current ethanol fuel demand.

 A cost optimisation model for regional transport fuel supply is developed and applied for two cases in one study region, one when the ethanol production plant is integrated with an existing CHP plant (polygeneration), and one with a standalone ethanol production plant. The results of the optimisation model show that in both cases the changes in ethanol production costs have the biggest influence on the cost of supplying the regional passenger car fleet with transport fuel, followed by the petrol price and straw production costs.

 By integrating the ethanol production process with a CHP plant, the costs of supplying regional passenger car fleet with transport fuel can be reduced by up to a third. Moreover, replacing petrol fuel with ethanol can cut regional CO2 emissions from transportation by half.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Västerås: Mälardalens högskola , 2011.
Series
Mälardalen University Press Licentiate Theses, ISSN 1651-9256 ; 143
Keyword [en]
Agricultural by-products, Straw, Bioethanol, Transport system, Greenhouse gases (GHG), Polygeneration system, Combined Heat and Power (CHP), Mixed Integer Programming (MIP).
National Category
Natural Sciences Engineering and Technology
Research subject
Energy- and Environmental Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-13176ISBN: 978-91-7485-044-4 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:mdh-13176DiVA: diva2:451435
Presentation
2011-12-09, Lambda, Mälardalens högskola, Västerås, 10:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2011-10-27 Created: 2011-10-25 Last updated: 2011-11-28Bibliographically approved
List of papers
1. Evaluation of a regional bioenergy system with local production of biofuel for transportation, integrated with a CHP plant
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evaluation of a regional bioenergy system with local production of biofuel for transportation, integrated with a CHP plant
2012 (English)In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 92, 739-749 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The share of renewable liquid fuels (ethanol, fatty acid methyl ester, biogas, and renewable electricity) in the total transportation fuel in Sweden, has increased by the end of 2009 to such level that e.g. domestic bioethanol production is unable to satisfy current ethanol fuel demand. Regional small-scale ethanol production can assist the region in covering the regional needs in transport fuel supply.

Current case study system includes the production of ethanol, biogas, heat and power from locally available cereals straw. A mixed integer programming (MIP) model is developed for cost optimization of regional transport fuel supply (ethanol, biogas and petrol). The model is applied for two cases, one when ethanol production plant is integrated with an existing CHP plant (polygeneration), and one with a standalone ethanol production plant.

The optimization results show that for both cases the changes in ethanol production costs have the biggest influence on the costs for supplying regional passenger car fleet with transport fuel. Petrol fuel price and straw production costs have also a significant effect on costs for supplying cars with transport fuel for both standalone ethanol production and integrated production system.

By integrating the ethanol production process with a CHP plant, the costs for supplying regional passenger car fleet with transport fuel can be cut by 31%, from 150 to 104 €/MW h fuel, which should be compared with E5 costs of 115 €/MW h (excl VAT).

National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-13199 (URN)10.1016/j.apenergy.2011.08.016 (DOI)000300463800079 ()2-s2.0-84855291259 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2011-10-27 Created: 2011-10-27 Last updated: 2014-01-07Bibliographically approved
2. Local production of bioethanol to meet the growing demands of a regional transport system
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Local production of bioethanol to meet the growing demands of a regional transport system
2011 (English)In: Proceedings of World Renewable Energy Congress 2011, May 2011, Linköping, Sweden, 2011Conference paper, (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

: Energy security and the mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) are the driving forces behind the development of renewable fuel sources worldwide. In Sweden, a relatively rapid development in bioethanol usage in transportation has been driven by the implementation of national taxation regulations on carbon neutral transport fuels. The demand for bioethanol to fuel transportation is growing and cannot be met through current domestic production alone. Lignocellulosic ethanol derived from agricultural crop residues may be a feasible alternative source of ethanol to secure a consistent regional fuel supply in Swedish climatic conditions. This paper analyzes how the regional energy system can contribute to reducing CO2 emissions by realizing local small scale bioethanol production and substituting petrol fuel with high blend ethanol mixtures for private road transport. The results show that about 13 000 m3 of bioethanol can be produced from the straw available in the studied region and that this amount can meet the current regional ethanol fuel demand. Replacing the current demand for petrol fuel for passenger cars with ethanol fuel can potentially reduce CO2 emissions from transportation by 48%.

National Category
Other Engineering and Technologies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-13197 (URN)
Conference
World Renewable Energy Congress 2011, May 2011, Linköping, Sweden
Available from: 2011-10-27 Created: 2011-10-27 Last updated: 2016-01-11Bibliographically approved
3. Bioethanol Production from Lignocellulosic Biomass, Evaluation of the Potential Bioethanol Production in Three Swedish Regions
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bioethanol Production from Lignocellulosic Biomass, Evaluation of the Potential Bioethanol Production in Three Swedish Regions
2009 (English)Conference paper, (Refereed)
National Category
Chemical Sciences
Research subject
Energy- and Environmental Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-7606 (URN)
Conference
17th, European biomass conference; from research to industry and markets; 2009; Berlin
Available from: 2009-11-29 Created: 2009-11-29 Last updated: 2016-01-11Bibliographically approved

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