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Strategic maintenance improvement: Driving forces and obstacles
Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-7494-1474
2010 (English)In: Engineering Asset Management and Infrastructure Sustainability: Proceedings of the 5th World Congress on Engineering Asset Management (WCEAM 2010), Springer , 2010, p. 789-801Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Global trade, increased levels of automation and ambitions to apply lean production increases the demand for effective maintenance of production equipment. Still, the maintenance function is often regarded as having mainly a tactical role for the assets. The fact that many companies have no clear goals for their maintenance activities is serious since goals and strategies are driving forces for increasing the maintenance effectiveness. Several studies have recognized that the absence of clear strategies obstruct maintenance development initiatives. Also, maintenance strategies should support the corporate strategy and business drivers considered critical success factors of the company. Maintenance development is the discipline of development of strategies, methods, and tools to be applied in any organization. However, well defined maintenance strategies have to be well implemented in order to contribute to the competitiveness of the company.

The aim of this paper is to identify some of the driving forces and obstacles that have to be dealt with when implementing maintenance strategies. In the paper, three industrial cases are presented to exemplify which implications to be dealt with when implementing maintenance strategies.

The paper is based on interviews and direct observations in three manufacturing companies in Sweden. All three companies have used the same method, within the same time frame to formulate maintenance strategies, fully aligned with their overall strategic goals. All three companies have their own specific challenges, but share the ambition to improve their maintenance programs.

The case studies show that implementation of maintenance strategies to a large amount resembles a typical change project with all its challenges. However some of the obstacles, and also some of the driving forces are more likely to appear in the maintenance context such as the organizational and cultural barriers between the maintenance and production departments.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer , 2010. p. 789-801
Keywords [en]
Maintenance strategy, Implementation, Change management
National Category
Mechanical Engineering
Research subject
Innovation and Design
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-12105DOI: 10.1007/978-0-85729-493-7ISBN: 9780857293015 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:mdh-12105DiVA, id: diva2:410107
Conference
WCEAM 2010
Projects
xpres
Funder
XPRES - Initiative for excellence in production researchAvailable from: 2011-04-12 Created: 2011-04-12 Last updated: 2013-12-04Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Strategic Maintenance Development in Manufacturing Industry
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Strategic Maintenance Development in Manufacturing Industry
2011 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Industrial maintenance is a substantial financial post. The total value of maintenance budgets in Europe has been estimated to be approximately 1500 billion € per year. At the same time, there are indications that about a third of these costs are wasted due to poor planning, overtime costs, inferior use of preventive maintenance and so forth. However, the diversity between different types of industry is substantial.

While the process industry, which is rather vulnerable to disturbances, has a tradition of viewing its maintenance as a strategic resource, the picture is quite different in discrete item manufacturing industry. Historically, manufacturing industry has had a surplus of finished goods and Work-In-Progress buffers between machinery. Therefore, the manufacturing industry has been able to fulfil its production demand despite unreliable production equipment. In the last few decades, the concept of lean production has started to spread within the manufacturing industry as a means to improve competitiveness. Manufacturing companies apply lean tools such as flow oriented production layout, Just-In-Time production and Demand-Flow-Technology. As a consequence, the vulnerability to system disturbances increases and hence, the demand for dependable production equipment increases. Despite this increasing demand on reliable production equipment, few manufacturing companies work with strategic maintenance development. One reason for this may be that the existing methods and concepts for maintenance development are quite resource demanding.

The main objective with this research is to develop a simple and cost effective approach aimed to formulate, implement, and evaluate maintenance strategies for the manufacturing industry. In five case studies the following has been studied: (1) The industry’s view on strategic maintenance development, (2) Formulation of maintenance strategies, (3) Implementation of maintenance strategies, (4) Cost of Poor Maintenance, and (5) Results from strategic maintenance development.

As a result from this research, a process for the formulation of maintenance strategies has been developed. Further, a number of driving forces and obstacles, that influence the implementation of maintenance strategies, have been identified. The concept of Cost of Poor Maintenance has been introduced as a means for evaluating the financial contribution of maintenance. Finally, three years of studies in three companies has shown substantial benefits from strategic maintenance development.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Västerås: Mälardalen University, 2011
Series
Mälardalen University Press Dissertations, ISSN 1651-4238 ; 99
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Research subject
Innovation and Design
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-12138 (URN)978-91-7485-010-9 (ISBN)
Public defence
2011-06-01, Filen, Smedjegatan 37, Eskilstuna, 10:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Funder
XPRES - Initiative for excellence in production research
Available from: 2011-04-20 Created: 2011-04-18 Last updated: 2013-12-06Bibliographically approved

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Salonen, Antti

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