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How to exist politically and learn from it: Hannah Arendt and the problem of democratic education
(SIDES)
2010 (English)In: Teachers College record (1970), ISSN 0161-4681, E-ISSN 1467-9620, Vol. 112, no 2, p. 556-575Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In discussions about democratic education, there is a strong tendency to see the role of education as that of the preparation of children and young people for their future participation in democratic life. A major problem with this view is that it relies on the idea that the guarantee for democracy lies in the existence of a properly educated citizenry so that once all citizens have received their education, democracy will simply follow.Purpose/Objective/Research Question/Focus of Study: The question that is explored in this article is whether it is possible to think of the relationship between education and democracy differently than in terms of preparation. This is important not only to be able to acknowledge the political nature of democratic education but also to be able to acknowledge the political "foundation" of democratic politics itself.Research Design: The argumentation in the article is developed through a critical analysis and discussion of the work of Hannah Arendt, with a specific focus on her ideas about the relationship between education and politics and her views on the role of understanding in politics.Findings/Results: Arendt's writings on the relationship between education and politics seem to be informed by a "developmentalistic" perspective in which it is maintained that the child is not yet ready for political life, so education has to be separated from politics and seen as a preparation for future participation in political life. Arendt's writings on politics and the role of understanding in political life point in a different direction. They articulate what it means to exist politically-that is, to exist together in plurality-and highlight that political existence is neither based on, nor can be guaranteed by, moral qualities such as tolerance and respect.Conclusions/Recommendations: The main conclusion of the article is that democratic education should not be seen as the preparation of citizens for their future participation in political life. Rather, it should focus on creating opportunities for political existence inside and outside schools. Rather than thinking of democratic education as learning for political existence, it is argued that the focus of our educational endeavours should be on how we can learn from political existence.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2010. Vol. 112, no 2, p. 556-575
Research subject
Didactics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-11322ISI: 000275367100009OAI: oai:DiVA.org:mdh-11322DiVA, id: diva2:384100
Available from: 2011-01-07 Created: 2011-01-07 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf