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Sense of coherence and psychological outcomes in people with spinal cord injury: Appraisals and behavioural responses
University of Oxford, Oxford Doctoral Course in Clinical Psychology and Stoke Mandeville Hospital, The National Spinal Injuries Centre, Department of Clinical Psychology.
Swiss Paraplegic Centre, Nottwil and Zurich University of Applied Sciences, School of Applied Psychology.
Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-5098-8489
Stoke Mandeville Hospital, The National Spinal Injuries Centre, Department of Clinical Psychology.
2010 (English)In: British Journal of Health Psychology, ISSN 1359-107X, Vol. 15, 611-621 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Study design. Longitudinal, multi-wave design.

Objectives. To investigate the contribution of sense of coherence (SOC), appraisals, and behavioural responses when predicting psychological outcomes to spinal cord injury (SCI).

Method. Patients (N = 237) sustaining a SCI aged 17 or above were recruited from specialist spinal injuries centres across six European countries. Measures of SOC, appraisals, coping strategies, and psychological well-being were administered at 6 and 12 weeks post-injury and at a 1 year follow-up.

Results. People scoring high on SOC at 6 weeks post-injury showed significantly better psychological outcomes at 1 year post-injury and SOC showed significant relationships with appraisals at 12 weeks post-injury and coping strategies 1 year postinjury. Significant relationships were found between appraisals at 12 weeks post-injury and psychological outcomes, adaptive coping strategies were significantly related to psychological well-being at 1 year post-injury. Regression analyses found SOC, appraisals, and coping behaviours to explain 61.8% of the variance in psychological quality of life, 66.5% of the variance in depression, and 37.7% of the variance in anxiety at 1 year post-injury. 

Conclusion. This study provides further evidence in support of previous findings which suggest SOC to have a primary role in long-term psychological well-being. The relationship described here – from SOC to the appraisal of injury and subsequent behavioural responses – suggests SOC to be an influential factor in the long-term adjustment of people with SCI.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2010. Vol. 15, 611-621 p.
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-11275DOI: 10.1348/135910709X478222ISI: 000280520900010PubMedID: 19917152Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-77955378363OAI: oai:DiVA.org:mdh-11275DiVA: diva2:380795
Available from: 2010-12-22 Created: 2010-12-22 Last updated: 2013-12-19Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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