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Changing services to children with disabilities and their families through in-service training - is the organisation affected?
Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication. (CHILD)
Jönköping University.
Jönköping University.
2008 (English)In: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 207-222Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Professional development in family centred services was given to professionals supporting children with disabilities and their families with the purpose to influence ways to perform working tasks. Is it possible to change ways of working through in-service training? In order to find answers to that question perceptions of in-service training at different organisational levels was collected by interviews. Ways to perform working tasks was investigated by self reported ratings on questionnaires. What kind of change the teams experienced was analysed through written assignments in the end of professional development. The study builds on a longitudinal design. Watzlawick, Weakland and Fisch (1974) identified orders of change is used to analyse perceptions of and changes after professional development. The findings reveal that participants at different levels of the organisation have rather similar perceptions of the in-service training. They are described more in depth by participants within the organisation than the ones outside (parents and managers), who rather describe the consequences of the professional development than the actual professional development process. After professional development the family approach has been adopted among most professionals, for example are assessment tools and model for habilitation plans which were presented in professional development used in everyday work after professional development. This implies a second order change. However do some professionals claim that the family  ways of working is nothing new to them, which correspond to a first order change. Professional development in conjunction with resources after professional development are therefore seen as factors that facilitate second order change.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Routledge , 2008. Vol. 23, no 3, p. 207-222
Keywords [en]
in-service training, changing practice, mixing methods study, perceptions
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-8135DOI: 10.1080/08856250802130418Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-48449095381OAI: oai:DiVA.org:mdh-8135DiVA, id: diva2:293454
Available from: 2010-02-11 Created: 2010-02-11 Last updated: 2013-07-31Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf