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Increased renewable electricity production in combined heat and power plants by introducing ethanol production
Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology. (PRO)
Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology. (PRO)
Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology. (PRO)ORCID iD: 0000-0003-0300-0762
Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology. (PRO)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3485-5440
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2009 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The development towards high energy efficiency and low environmental impact by humaninteractions, has led to a change in many levels of society. Due to the introduction of penalties oncarbon dioxide emissions and other economic instruments, the energy industry is striving towardsenergy efficiency improvement and climate mitigation by switching from fossil to renewablefuels. Biomass-based combined heat and power (CHP) plants connected to district heatingnetworks have a need to find uses for excess heat to produce electricity during summer when theheat demand is low. On the other hand, the transport sector is contributing substantially to theincreased CO2 emissions, which have to be reduced. One promising alternative to address the twochallenging issues is the integration of vehicle fuel production with biomass based CHP plants. Inthis paper, the configuration and operation profits in terms of electricity, heat and ethanol fuelfrom cellulosic biomass are presented. A case study of a commercial small-scale CHP plant hasbeen carried out using simulation and modeling tools. The results clearly show that electricityproduction can be increased when CHP production is integrated with cellulosic ethanolproduction. The findings presented also show that the economical benefits of the energy systemcan be realized with near-term commercially available technology

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2009.
National Category
Energy Engineering
Research subject
Energy- and Environmental Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-7515OAI: oai:DiVA.org:mdh-7515DiVA, id: diva2:277561
Conference
International Conference of Applied Energy, Hong Kong, 5-7 January, 2009
Projects
PolygenerationAvailable from: 2009-11-19 Created: 2009-11-19 Last updated: 2016-01-11Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Improving the performance of combined heat and power plants through integration with cellulosic ethanol production
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Improving the performance of combined heat and power plants through integration with cellulosic ethanol production
2011 (English)Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Today’s biomass-fired combined heat and power (CHP) plants have surplus heat production capacity during warmer times of the year. In order to allow them to increase their electricity production, it is essential to find a use for the surplus heat.

Additionally, the transport sector is struggling with high fuel prices and the contribution of CO2 emissions to global warming. A promising way of reducing the negative effects caused by combustion of fossil fuels in the transport sector is to mix ethanol with gasoline, or to use pure ethanol in modified engines. Ethanol is produced by fermentation at low temperatures and the production process could be integrated with CHP plants.

The first generation of ethanol production as fuel has recently been criticized for competing with food crops and for its production chain being a larger polluter than was first thought. The second generation of ethanol production from lignocellulosic materials offers very promising results, but this process has several steps that are energy demanding.

This thesis presents the findings of research on the configuration of a CHP plant with an integrated second generation ethanol production process. It also presents the operational economics and optimal locations for such plants in Sweden. Two case studies were performed to compare different feedstocks for ethanol production.

The results show that when electricity prices are high, CHP plants benefit from heat consumption. Even with low yields in an ethanol production process, the integrated plant can be profitable. The plant must be located where there is sufficient heat demand. A cellulosic ethanol production process can work as a heat sink with profitable outcomes even with the current state of development of cellulosic ethanol technology.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Västerås: Mälardalen University, 2011
Series
Mälardalen University Press Licentiate Theses, ISSN 1651-9256 ; 130
Keywords
Combined heat and power, Polygeneration, biofuel, bioenergy
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Research subject
Energy- and Environmental Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-12070 (URN)978-91-7485-009-3 (ISBN)
Presentation
2011-05-27, Kappa, Mälardalens högskola, Västerås, 09:10 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2011-04-05 Created: 2011-04-05 Last updated: 2011-04-14Bibliographically approved

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Yan, JinuyeThorin, EvaDotzauer, Erik

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Starfelt, FredrikDaianova, LiliaYan, JinuyeThorin, EvaDotzauer, Erik
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