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Atmosphere in Participatory Design
Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Industrial Economics and Organisation. (NMP)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-6998-5034
Department of Design and Planning in Complex Environments, IUAV University of Venice, Venice, Italy.
The Westminster Law & Theory Lab, University of Westminster, London, UK.
(English)In: Science as Culture, ISSN 0950-5431, E-ISSN 1470-1189Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

The relationship between democracy and design has been the topic of significant discussion in the design community. It is also at the core of participatory design that relies on the principle of genuine participation. According to this, users are not mere informants but legitimate participants in the design process. A great deal of participatory design, however, is driven by instrumental logics rather than participatory and democratic principles. In analysing these power relations, science and technology studies (STS) provides the starting point to introduce the concepts of ‘engineering an atmosphere’ (i.e. the process) and ‘engineered atmosphere’ (i.e. the outcome). These concepts problematise the principles and modes of participatory design, highlighting the tensions between economic and social agendas and top-down and bottom-up interactions. This problematic can be shown in the way that new teachnologies are targeted at older populations, necessitating an interrogation of the processes underpirnning the design and development of technological products and devices. It is important to reflect on who is included and who is excluded from technological design and innovation, which is always, and necessarily so, a fluid process.

Keywords [en]
Atmosphere; configuring; design; participation; script
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-45844DOI: 10.1080/09505431.2019.1681952ISI: 000492311400001OAI: oai:DiVA.org:mdh-45844DiVA, id: diva2:1365506
Available from: 2019-10-25 Created: 2019-10-25 Last updated: 2019-12-13Bibliographically approved

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Cozza, Michela

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
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Output format
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