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Preference organization in English as a Medium of Instruction classrooms in a Turkish higher education setting
Foreign Language Education, Hacettepe University, Ankara, Turkey.
Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication, Educational Sciences and Mathematics.
2019 (English)In: Linguistics and Education, ISSN 0898-5898, E-ISSN 1873-1864, Vol. 49, p. 72-85Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Previous conversation analytic research has documented various aspects of preference organization and the ways dispreference is displayed in relation to pedagogical focus in L2 and CLIL classrooms (Seedhouse, 1997; Hellermann, 2009; Kääntä, 2010). This study explores preference organization in an under-researched context, an English as a Medium of Instruction (EMI) setting, and it specifically focuses on how a teacher displays dispreference for preceding learner turns. The data consist of 30 h of video recordings from two EMI classes, which were recorded for an academic term at a university in Turkey. Using Conversation Analysis, we demonstrate that the teacher employs a variety of interactional resources such as changing body position, gaze movements, hedging, and delaying devices to show dispreference for preceding student answers. Based on our empirical analysis, the ways the teacher prioritizes content and task over form/language are illustrated. The analyses also reveal that negotiation of meaning at content level and production of complex L2 structures can simultaneously be enabled through teachers’ specific turn designs in EMI classroom interaction. This demonstrates that preference organization, particularly in a teacher's responsive turns, can act as a catalyst for complex L2 production and enhance student participation. This study has implications for conversation analytic research on instructed learning settings, and in particular on teachers’ turn design in classroom interaction. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier Ltd , 2019. Vol. 49, p. 72-85
Keywords [en]
Classroom interaction, Conversation analysis, English as a medium of instruction, Higher education, Preference organization
National Category
Pedagogy Didactics Learning Specific Languages
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-42699DOI: 10.1016/j.linged.2018.12.006ISI: 000461483700008Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85061053438OAI: oai:DiVA.org:mdh-42699DiVA, id: diva2:1288973
Available from: 2019-02-15 Created: 2019-02-15 Last updated: 2019-04-04Bibliographically approved

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Sert, Olcay

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf