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Perceptions and adoption of evs for private use and policy lessons learned
Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-5277-4567
Aachen University, Germany.
2016 (English)In: Technologies and Applications for Smart Charging of Electric and Plug-in Hybrid Vehicles, Springer International Publishing , 2016, p. 283-300Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Electric vehicles (EVs) are considered one of the most promising solutions to mitigate greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions produced in the transport sector. EVs have many potential advantages (e.g., in terms of avoided local and global pollutant emissions and noise reduction), but may also create new problems (e.g., in terms of stress on the electric distribution network or congested public transport lanes). The ultimate pollution emission benefit depends strongly on the fuel mix for electricity generation. Numerous governments at all levels worldwide have started to provide monetary and other incentives to render EVs more attractive for users, including research, development, and dissemination (RD&D) support, vehicle subsidies, provision of charging infrastructure, and privileged usage of bus lanes and dedicated parking lots. This chapter presents the different barriers explaining the slow market penetration of EVs so far, consumer perceptions and misconceptions, as well as lessons learned by policy makers and new empirical evidence and insights. Early adopter characteristics and selected examples where EV uptake has been particularly fast are also described. The conclusions show that subsidy and other incentive programs need to be carefully designed in scope, contents, and duration. In light of information deficiencies and misperceptions, information provision to potential EV adopters seems to be a no-regret policy option.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer International Publishing , 2016. p. 283-300
Keywords [en]
Electric power distribution, Gas emissions, Noise abatement, Charging infrastructures, Consumer perception, Electric Vehicles (EVs), Electricity generation, Incentive programs, Information provision, Market penetration, Pollution emissions, Greenhouse gases
National Category
Electrical Engineering, Electronic Engineering, Information Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-42470DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-43651-7_8Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85022339477ISBN: 9783319436517 (print)ISBN: 9783319436494 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:mdh-42470DiVA, id: diva2:1283205
Available from: 2019-01-28 Created: 2019-01-28 Last updated: 2019-06-25Bibliographically approved

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Vassileva, Iana

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf