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Factors associated with work ability following exercise interventions for people with chronic whiplash-associated disorders: Secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial
Univ Queensland, Australia.
Univ Queensland, Australia.
Linköping Univ, Sweden.
Linköping Univ, Sweden.
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2018 (English)In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 50, no 9, p. 828-836Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To investigate the efficacy of exercise interventions and factors associated with changes in work ability for people with chronic whiplash-associated disorders. Design: Secondary analysis of a single-blind, randomized multi-centre controlled trial. Setting: Interventions were conducted in Swedish primary care settings. Patients: A total of 165 individuals with chronic whiplash-associated disorders grade II-III. Methods: Participants were randomly allocated to neck-specific exercise, neck-specific exercise with a behavioural approach, or prescribed physical activity interventions. Work ability was evaluated with the Work Ability Index at baseline, 3, 6 and 12 months. Results: The neck-specific exercise with a behavioural approach intervention significantly improved work ability compared with the prescribed physical activity intervention (3 months, p = 0.03; 6 months, p = 0.01; 12 months, p = 0.01), and neck-specific exercise at 12 months (p = 0.01). Neck-specific exercise was better than the prescribed physical activity intervention at 6 months (p = 0.05). An increase in work ability from baseline to one year for the neck-specific exercise with a behavioural approach group (p < 0.01) was the only significant within-group difference. Higher self-rated physical demands at work, greater disability, greater depression and poorer financial situation were associated with poorer work ability (p < 0.01). Conclusion: This study found that neck-specific exercise with a behavioural approach intervention was better at improving self-reported work ability than neck-specific exercise or prescribed physical activity. Improvement in work ability is associated with a variety of factors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. Vol. 50, no 9, p. 828-836
Keywords [en]
employment, whiplash injuries, exercise, persistent neck pain
National Category
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-41266DOI: 10.2340/16501977-2374ISI: 000447771700008PubMedID: 30132011Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85053639587OAI: oai:DiVA.org:mdh-41266DiVA, id: diva2:1260140
Available from: 2018-11-01 Created: 2018-11-01 Last updated: 2019-01-04Bibliographically approved

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Overmeer, Thomas

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