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Alcohol influence on acrylamide to glycidamide metabolism assessed with hemoglobin-adducts and questionnaire data
Stockholm Univ, Dept Mat & Environm Chem, S-10405 Stockholm, Sweden..
Harvard Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Boston, MA 02115 USA.;Harvard Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Nutr, Boston, MA 02115 USA..
Stockholm Univ, Dept Mat & Environm Chem, S-10405 Stockholm, Sweden..
Stockholm Univ, Dept Mat & Environm Chem, S-10405 Stockholm, Sweden..
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2010 (English)In: Food and Chemical Toxicology, ISSN 0278-6915, E-ISSN 1873-6351, Vol. 48, no 3, p. 820-824Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Our purpose was to investigate whether alcohol (ethanol) consumption could have an influence on the metabolism of acrylamide to glycidamide in humans exposed to acrylamide through food. We studied a subsample from a population-based case-control study of prostate cancer in Sweden (CAPS). Questionnaire data for alcohol intake estimates was compared to the ratio of hemoglobin-adduct levels for acrylamide and glycidamide, used as a measure of individual differences in metabolism. Data from 161 nonsmoking men were processed with regard to the influence of alcohol on the metabolism of acrylamide to glycidamide. A negative, linear trend of glycidamide-adduct to acrylamide-adduct-level ratios with increasing alcohol intake was observed and the strongest association (p-value for trend = 0.02) was obtained in the group of men with the lowest adduct levels (<= 47 pmol/g globin) when alcohol intake was stratified by acrylamide-adduct levels. The observed trend is likely due to a competitive effect between ethanol and acrylamide as both are substrates for cytochrome P450 2E1. Our results, strongly indicating that ethanol influence metabolism of acrylamide to glycidamide, partly explain earlier observations of only low to moderate associations between questionnaire data on dietary acrylamide intake and hemoglobin-adduct levels. (C) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD , 2010. Vol. 48, no 3, p. 820-824
Keywords [en]
Acrylamide, Alcohol, Glycidamide, Hemoglobin-adducts, Food frequency questionnaire
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-40698DOI: 10.1016/j.fct.2009.12.014ISI: 000275943600009PubMedID: 20034532OAI: oai:DiVA.org:mdh-40698DiVA, id: diva2:1246098
Available from: 2018-09-06 Created: 2018-09-06 Last updated: 2018-09-06Bibliographically approved

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