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Lifetime body size and prostate cancer risk in a population-based case-control study in Sweden
Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, SE-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, SE-17177 Stockholm, Sweden.;Harvard Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Boston, MA 02115 USA..
Harvard Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Boston, MA 02115 USA.;Brigham & Womens Hosp, Dept Med, Channing Div Network Med, Boston, MA 02115 USA.;Harvard Univ, Sch Med, Boston, MA USA.;Univ Iceland, Ctr Publ Hlth Sci, Reykjavik, Iceland..
Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, SE-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..ORCID iD: 0000-0002-6546-3650
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2013 (English)In: Cancer Causes and Control, ISSN 0957-5243, E-ISSN 1573-7225, Vol. 24, no 12, p. 2143-2155Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The role of body size in prostate cancer etiology is unclear and potentially varies by age and disease subtype. We investigated whether body size in childhood and adulthood, including adult weight change, is related to total, low-intermediate-risk, high-risk, and fatal prostate cancer. We used data on 1,499 incident prostate cancer cases and 1,118 population controls in Sweden. Body figure at age 10 was assessed by silhouette drawings. Adult body mass index (BMI) and weight change were based on self-reported height and weight between ages 20 and 70. We estimated odds ratios (ORs) with 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) by unconditional logistic regression. Height was positively associated with prostate cancer. Overweight/obesity in childhood was associated with a 54 % increased risk of dying from prostate cancer compared to normal weight, whereas a 27 % lower risk was seen in men who were moderately thin (drawing 2) in childhood (P (trend) = 0.01). Using BMI < 22.5 as a reference, we observed inverse associations between BMI 22.5 to < 25 at age 20 and all prostate cancer subtypes (ORs in the range 0.72-0.82), and between mean adult BMI 25 to < 27.5 and low-intermediate-risk disease (OR 0.75, 95 % CI 0.55-1.02). Moderate adult weight gain increased the risk of disease in men with low BMI at start and in short men. Our comprehensive life-course approach revealed no convincing associations between anthropometric measures and prostate cancer risk. However, we found some leads that deserve further investigation, particularly for early-life body size. Our study highlights the importance of the time window of exposure in prostate cancer development.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SPRINGER , 2013. Vol. 24, no 12, p. 2143-2155
Keywords [en]
Prostatic neoplasms, Body figure, Height, Body mass index, Weight change, Epidemiology
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Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-40681DOI: 10.1007/s10552-013-0291-0ISI: 000326632200010PubMedID: 24048969OAI: oai:DiVA.org:mdh-40681DiVA, id: diva2:1246025
Available from: 2018-09-06 Created: 2018-09-06 Last updated: 2018-09-06Bibliographically approved

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Bälter, Katarina

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