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Dietary Intake and Supplement Use of Vitamins C and E and Upper Respiratory Tract Infection
Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden.;Osher Ctr Integrat Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Sch Comp Sci & Commun, Royal Inst Technol, Stockholm, Sweden..
RTI Hlth Solut, Res Triangle Pk, NC USA.;Boston Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Boston, MA USA.;Boston Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Med, Boston, MA USA..
Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden..ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2046-5641
2011 (English)In: Journal of the American College of Nutrition (Print), ISSN 0731-5724, E-ISSN 1541-1087, Vol. 30, no 4, p. 248-258Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: Antioxidants are regulators of immune function and may play a role in upper respiratory tract infections (URTI). We investigated the potential effects of dietary intake from food and supplement use of vitamins C and E on the risk of self-reported URTI. Methods: We conducted a population-based cohort study of 1509 Swedish men and women ages 20 to 60 with a follow-up period of 4 months. Participants reported a total of 1181 occurrences of URTI. Poisson regression model was used to control for age, sex, and other confounding factors. Results: Among women, we found that the incidence rate ratio (IRR) for high intake of vitamin C (>200 mg/d) from food was 0.69 (95% CI 0.49-0.98) compared with low intake (<100 mg/d). This association was not seen among men, for whom the IRR was 1.16 (95% CI 0.79-1.70) for high intake of vitamin C (>150 mg/d) compared with low intake (<50 mg/d). We saw no protective effect of vitamin E from food among either men or women, but a possible protective effect of vitamin C and E supplement use among men (vitamin C, 0.69 [95% CI 0.47-1.02]; vitamin E, 0.56 [95% CI 0.33-0.95]), although not among women. Conclusion: The present study is the first observational study to suggest that intake of vitamin C from food is sufficient to lower the risk of URTI among women. In addition, it appears that supplement use of vitamin E and vitamin C may reduce the risk of URTI among men, who overall had a lower intake of vitamin C from food than women.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ROUTLEDGE JOURNALS, TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD , 2011. Vol. 30, no 4, p. 248-258
Keywords [en]
antioxidants, URTI, URI, epidemiology, web questionnaires
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-40691DOI: 10.1080/07315724.2011.10719967ISI: 000208685400004PubMedID: 21917705OAI: oai:DiVA.org:mdh-40691DiVA, id: diva2:1246011
Available from: 2018-09-06 Created: 2018-09-06 Last updated: 2018-09-06Bibliographically approved

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