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Fault signatures and bias progression in dissolved oxygen sensors
Uppsala University, Sweden. (Division of Systems and Control, Department of Information Technology)
IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute, Sweden..
Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-8034-4043
Uppsala University, Sweden. (Division of Systems and Control, Department of Information Technology)
2018 (English)In: Water Science and Technology, ISSN 0273-1223, E-ISSN 1996-9732, Vol. 78, no 5, p. 1034-1044Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Biofilm fouling is known to impact the data quality of sensors, but little is known about the exact effects. We studied the effects of artificial and real biofilm fouling on dissolved oxygen (DO) sensors in full-scale water resource recovery facilities, and how this can automatically be detected. Biofilm fouling resulted in different drift direction and bias magnitudes for optical (OPT) and electrochemical (MEC) DO sensors. The OPT-sensor was more affected by biofilm fouling compared to the MEC sensor, especially during summer conditions. A bias of 1 mg/L was detected by analysing the impulse response (IR) of the automatic air cleaning system in the DO sensor. The IR is an effect of a temporal increase in DO concentration during the automatic air cleaning. The IRs received distinct pattern changes that were matched with faults including: biofilm fouling, disturbances in the air supply to the cleaning system, and damaged sensor membrane, which can be used for fault diagnosis. The results highlight the importance of a condition based sensor maintenance schedule in contrast to fixed cleaning intervals. Further, the results stress the importance of understanding and detecting bias due to biofilm fouling, in order to maintain a robust and resource efficient process control.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. Vol. 78, no 5, p. 1034-1044
National Category
Environmental Engineering Environmental Biotechnology Water Engineering
Research subject
Energy- and Environmental Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-40533DOI: 10.2166/wst.2018.350ISI: 000447742600005PubMedID: 30339528Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85055081280OAI: oai:DiVA.org:mdh-40533DiVA, id: diva2:1241524
Available from: 2018-08-23 Created: 2018-08-23 Last updated: 2019-01-04Bibliographically approved

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Zambrano, Jesus

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