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“A body in transformation”: - An Empirical phenomenological study about fear-avoidance beliefs towards physical activity among persons experiencing moderate to severe rheumatic pain
Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare. Sophiahemmet University, Stockholm,Sweden. (BeMe)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-7018-2706
Sophiahemmet University, Stockholm,Sweden.
(English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Aims. To gain a better understanding of fear-avoidance beliefs towards physical activity and body awareness in people experiencing moderate to severe rheumatic pain.  Background. Rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis are long-term conditions with pain as the prominent symptom. Health-promoting physical activity is recommended, and can have an analgesic effect. High self-rated pain has previously been reported to be associated with increased fear-avoidance behaviour in relation to physical activity. Body awareness, which includes attentional focus and awareness of internal body sensations, could be valuable in the nursing care of long-term diseases.   Design. Empirical phenomenological.  Methods. An empirical phenomenological psychological method was applied. Interviews were undertaken in 2016 with 11 informants (eight females and three males, age range 44–71 years) who were diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis (n = 7) or psoriatic arthritis (n = 4), with a disease duration ranging from 3–35 years. The mean visual analogue scale score in the study sample was 60 mm.   Results. Three typologies were identified: “My relatively fragile physical status”, “I am an active creator” and “Part of something bigger than myself.” Conclusions. The current findings indicated that pain anticipation and fear-avoidance beliefs towards physical activity sometimes affected the behaviour of individuals with long-term rheumatic pain syndromes. People experiencing moderate to high rheumatic pain tended to focus on their fragile physical and emotional state. By adopting a more favourable attitude towards the self, the body could be restored to a state of calm and balance.  Relevance to clinical practice. The current findings are relevant for healthcare professionals engaged in health-promotion clinical practice.

Keywords [en]
Fear-avoidance beliefs, Body awareness, Pain, Rheumatic diseases, Nursing
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Care Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-40184DOI: 10.1111/jocn.14606OAI: oai:DiVA.org:mdh-40184DiVA, id: diva2:1230877
Available from: 2018-07-04 Created: 2018-07-04 Last updated: 2018-08-14Bibliographically approved

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Lööf, Helena

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CiteExportLink to record
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