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Technological Change in an International Industrial System
Mälardalen University, School of Business.
2007 (English)Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other scientific)
Abstract [en]

Industrial systems resist change, more often, because heavy production facilities and industrial constructions are expensive and have long economic lives, but also because people tend to defend ingrained conceptions of how things are and how activities ought to be performed. Starting out from the question: “How does technological change come about in an international, industrial system?” the thesis investigates the interplay between technological, social, and economic factors. Empirically the work is located to the steel and metals industries and covers business exchange within and between several economic entities performing international business operations.

It is shown that technological change is driven by strategic intention, but that it also occurs as a result of chance or “necessity”, or follows on everyday enterprise operations. In an attempt to realize strategic intentions actors involve in games of negotiation while referring to different power bases. Backed by organizational role (hierarchic level/managerial position), personal “luminosity” (charisma/leadership), or control over critical resources (that other actors are interested in) various arguments are put to the test on “the arena for negotiations and change”. While involving in negotiations actors may relate to existing business and/or social relations for support or they may take advantage of full-blown coalitions.

Constrained by the games of negotiation, which unfold in an institutional environment, the process of technological change adopts evidently evolutionary characteristics, and it follows implicitly that the single actor has at its disposal only limited possibilities to determine the process outcome. Technological change as an evolutionary process consists of three underlying sub-processes, viz. innovation, interaction, and institutionalization, it is argued.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Ekonomihögskolan , 2007. , p. 370
Series
Mälardalen University Press Dissertations, ISSN 1651-4238 ; 47
Keywords [en]
technology, technological change, industrial networks, business relationships, strategic intention, power, negotiations, social capital, coalitions, structural inertness
National Category
Other Mechanical Engineering
Research subject
Industriell ekonomi och organisation
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-245ISBN: 978-91-85485-50-5 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:mdh-245DiVA, id: diva2:120704
Public defence
2007-08-31, Omega, Högskoleplan, Västerås, 13:15
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2007-05-22 Created: 2007-05-22

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fulltext(3578 kB)1443 downloads
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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf