mdh.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Adapting to dynamic conditions through continuous innovation in manufacturing
Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-8291-7362
2018 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The speed of change increases due to the pace of technological change and globalisation, and many industries that usually have acted in more stable settings will in the future act in more dynamic marketplaces. In order to be able to manage dynamic conditions, the organisation needs to continue delivering effectively in existing business areas while developing new systems, products and processes to take advantage of new opportunities in the future. This means that the organisation must be able to use abilities for exploitation and exploration simultaneously or, in other words, strive for continuous innovation including ambidexterity.

In the traditional manufacturing industry, many companies use some sort of improvement programme for achieving operational excellence. Hence, a trend among multinational manufacturing companies is also to deploy and integrate corporate improvement programmes (XPS). These are based on lean production and inspired by the Toyota Production System. Generally, improvement programmes such as XPS largely support the development of exploitation capabilities but not exploration capabilities, which instead may have to stand back. Previous research states that these are problematic and complex issues that need to be further understood and developed. Therefore, more knowledge and support needs to be developed regarding how manufacturing companies can adapt their production systems to remain resource-efficient while simultaneously adapting to more radical changes.

The overall purpose of this research project is to contribute to an increased understanding of how XPS integrations can be developed towards continuous innovation to be able to manage more dynamic conditions. Accordingly, the research objective is to develop recommendations supporting continuous innovation in manufacturing. An overall longitudinal study has been carried out containing five case studies at a manufacturing company integrating an XPS during dynamic conditions, i.e., with large variations in volumes and mixes of products together with the introduction of new products and production concepts. The studies conducted and the results are presented in five appended papers.

The research shows there is a risk that the XPS concept is abandoned due to a lack of understanding of how the XPS contributes to solve the turbulent situation that appears under dynamic conditions. At the same time, it is important to develop and support exploration skills in parallel, as these abilities are not particularly well developed in this context. Furthermore, the research shows that a strategy formulation process striving for high involvement can be used as a means of creating ambidextrous capabilities.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Västerås: Mälardalen University , 2018.
Series
Mälardalen University Press Dissertations, ISSN 1651-4238 ; 261
National Category
Engineering and Technology Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Research subject
Innovation and Design
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-39082ISBN: 978-91-7485-385-8 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:mdh-39082DiVA, id: diva2:1203622
Public defence
2018-06-15, Filen, Mälardalens högskola, Eskilstuna, 13:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2018-05-04 Created: 2018-05-03 Last updated: 2018-05-16Bibliographically approved
List of papers
1. Exploration and Exploitation within Operations
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploration and Exploitation within Operations
Show others...
2015 (English)In: International Journal of Social, Behavioral, Educational, Economic, Business and Industrial Engineering, E-ISSN 1307-6892, Vol. 9, no 8Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Exploration and exploitation capabilities are both important within Operations as means for improvement when managed separately, and for establishing dynamic improvement capabilities when combined in balance. However, it is unclear what exploration and exploitation capabilities imply in improvement and development work within an Operations context. So, in order to better understand how to develop exploration and exploitation capabilities within Operations, the main characteristics of these constructs needs to be identified and further understood. Thus, the objective of this research is to increase the understanding about exploitation and exploration characteristics, to concretize what they translates to within the context of improvement and development work in an Operations unit, and to identify practical challenges. A literature review and a case study are presented. In the literature review, different interpretations of exploration and exploitation are portrayed, key characteristics have been identified, and a deepened understanding of exploration and exploitation characteristics is described. The case in the study is an Operations unit, and the aim is to explore to what extent and in what ways exploration and exploitation activities are part of the improvement structures and processes. The contribution includes an identification of key characteristics of exploitation and exploration, as well as an interpretation of the constructs. Further, some practical challenges are identified. For instance, exploration activities tend to be given low priority, both in daily work as in the manufacturing strategy. Also, the overall understanding about the concepts of exploitation and exploration (or any similar aspect of dynamic improvement capabilities) is very low.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WASET, 2015
Keywords
Exploration, exploitation, improvement, innovation, operations, production system, manufacturing, change
National Category
Engineering and Technology Other Engineering and Technologies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-29646 (URN)
Projects
INNOFACTURE - innovative manufacturing development
Available from: 2015-12-03 Created: 2015-11-26 Last updated: 2018-05-03Bibliographically approved
2. Transitioning radical improvement to continuous improvement
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Transitioning radical improvement to continuous improvement
2012 (English)In: Flexible Automation and Intelligent Manufacturing: 22nd International Conference on Flexible Automation and Intelligent Manufacturing, Helsinki, Finland: FAIM 2012 and Tampere University of Technology, Department of Production Engineering , 2012Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Lean Production can be implemented by performing a radical improvement step, Kaikaku, that thereafter enables continuous improvement, Kaizen. However, the overall success and competitiveness of a company lays in its ability to combine radical improvement with continuous improvement; with radical improvement achieve fast results and with continuous improvement sustain results and gradually improve. The purpose of the study presented in this paper is to investigate the relationships between radical and continuous improvement. What factors enable continuous improvement after radical improvement, and what can be done to further develop continuous improvement after radical improvement? A case study has been conducted at a company that has accomplished a radical improvement step and started their work with continuous improvement. Six pilot groups from the production facilities were observed, and interviews with supervisors, team leaders and operators were conducted. A number of business ratios have been collected in order to investigate the progress of the continuous improvement work. The study shows that success factors important for enabling continuous improvement after radical improvement are Participation, Control and Follow-up, Leadership and Values. In order for the organisation to be able to continue to improve over time, it is important that the success factors Vision and Goals, Education and Learning, Way of Working and Organisation and Support continue to develop.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Helsinki, Finland: FAIM 2012 and Tampere University of Technology, Department of Production Engineering, 2012
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-22240 (URN)978-952-15-2824-8 (ISBN)
Conference
22nd International Conference on Flexible Automation and Intelligent Manufacturing,10-13 June 2012, Tampere, Finland
Projects
KaikakuxpresINNOFACTURE - innovative manufacturing development
Funder
XPRES - Initiative for excellence in production research
Available from: 2013-11-03 Created: 2013-10-31 Last updated: 2018-05-03
3. Exploring a holistic perspective on production system improvement
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploring a holistic perspective on production system improvement
2016 (English)In: International Journal of Quality and Reliability Management, ISSN 0265-671X, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 267-283Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to examine how holistic improvement work can be organized and what challenges can be observed in the process of adopting a holistic perspective on production system improvement. Design/methodology/approach – A qualitative case study and a questionnaire have been carried out. Data for the case study has been collected through semi-structured interviews, archived documents and participatory observations. The questionnaire was done in order to increase the generalizability of the findings from the case study and further validate the conclusions. Findings – The improvement work at the case company is organized as a continuous improvement approach in a Lean Production system in the form of a company-specific production system (XPS), in which two other improvement approaches are incorporated. Some of the identified challenges are: the establishment of a holistic perspective on improvement opportunities; the development of a process to update the production strategy; the continuous update of the Operational Management System during the XPS implementation; aggregating measures for the improvement work and measuring the effect of improvement work. Research limitations/implications – As the current case study is limited to one case company, future research is interested in expanding to other production systems contexts for further validation. Originality/value – The present study offers an increased understanding of the integration difficulties of improvement work that many production companies face regarding operational effectiveness, and based on the findings, some implications for management are presented.

Keywords
Company-specific production system; Continuous improvement; Lean implementation; Lean production; Quality management
National Category
Engineering and Technology Mechanical Engineering
Research subject
Innovation and Design
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-24253 (URN)10.1108/IJQRM-11-2013-0187 (DOI)000382538000007 ()2-s2.0-84955484326 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2014-01-22 Created: 2014-01-22 Last updated: 2018-05-03Bibliographically approved
4. Lean production integration adaptable to dynamic conditions
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Lean production integration adaptable to dynamic conditions
2018 (English)In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 29, no 8, p. 1358-1375Article in journal (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

The purpose of this paper is to understand how a continuous improvement (CI) approach like lean production (LP) integration is affected by dynamic conditions and to propose how LP integration can be adaptable to dynamic conditions. Design/methodology/approach A longitudinal case study has been conducted in which data were collected through participative observations, observations, documents and an in-depth semi-structured interview. Findings The adaptability is related to the maturity level of the LP integration, where more mature organisations are better equipped to deal with the challenges occurring due to their learning and experimentation capabilities. The main problem is that the LP integration needs to be adapted, like compromising with just-in-time. This creates challenges to more immature organisations; they do not seem to be able to adapt the LP integration since the skills are lacking. Research limitations/implications The research limitations are associated with the research design and therefore might limit generalisation of the context studied. Practical implications The management needs to stay focused on the LP integration to continue building CI capability. There is a need to adapt the LP concept, which includes assessing how proposed changes and the LP concept interact in order to make them reinforce each other. This involves creating guidelines concerning adaptation and facilitating a transition from mainly single-loop learning to double-loop learning. Originality/value This paper contributes by describing challenges that have an impact on LP integration and related organisational adaptability under dynamic conditions.

National Category
Engineering and Technology Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-39080 (URN)10.1108/JMTM-02-2018-0055 (DOI)000447320500005 ()
Available from: 2018-04-26 Created: 2018-04-26 Last updated: 2018-11-01Bibliographically approved
5. Strategy formulation - bridging the gap between exploration and exploitation
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Strategy formulation - bridging the gap between exploration and exploitation
2017 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Operational excellence programmes develop good exploitation capabilities within operations, but for realising radical and innovative changes, exploration capabilities are also needed. Making the capabilities coexist is challenging since they tend to counteract one another. Based on a case study, this paper explores challenges related to exploitation and exploration, it investigates whether and how a strategy formulation process can be used to manage these challenges and analyse the consequences for the operational excellence programme. Challenges were identified, and it was found that a strategy formulation process can be used as a means to bridge the gap between exploitation and exploration. 

National Category
Engineering and Technology Other Engineering and Technologies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-39071 (URN)
Conference
24th EurOMA Conference, Edinburgh 1st - 6th July
Available from: 2018-04-26 Created: 2018-04-26 Last updated: 2018-05-31Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(2001 kB)50 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT02.pdfFile size 2001 kBChecksum SHA-512
1e3caab6e74ed9ede6b2ff029408a643c2d3c87a445427935e7e139c2059b44f622fa92b601c4d4d1c055c172dc9eb3e2c1b9d2cce5555123317bed6e599d6b1
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Authority records BETA

Stålberg, Lina

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Stålberg, Lina
By organisation
Innovation and Product Realisation
Engineering and TechnologyProduction Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 50 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

isbn
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

isbn
urn-nbn
Total: 70 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf