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Lived experience of significant others of persons with diabetes
Mälardalen University, Department of Caring and Public Health Sciences.
Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
2007 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, Vol. 16, no 7b, p. 215-222Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim. To elucidate the lived experience of being a significant other of a person withdiabetes.

Background. A person’s illness has consequences not only for the affected. Despite an increasing number of studies on significant others, there have been few about the experience of being a significant other of a person with diabetes.

Design. Phenomenological-hermeneutic approach.

Method. Fifteen significant others of persons with diabetes were interviewed.

The interviews were conversational, starting with an open question. They were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. The texts were analysed and interpreted.

Results. The meaning of the lived experienced as narrated by the significant others is presented by way of four major themes: living in concern about the other’s health, striving to be involved, experiencing confidence and handling the illness. Many significant others said that they lived a normal life and had come to accept diabetes as a normal part of life. At the same time, the significant

others experienced sorrow when they saw the health of the person with diabetes deteriorate over time.

Conclusions. Living near a person with diabetes meant being constantly attentive to how the person was feeling. The significant others wanted to be involved in the illness by the persons with diabetes and healthcare staff. They felt confidence

both in the way the person with diabetes handled the illness and in the ongoing research about diabetes. The significant others had found ways to handle the illness but lacked support from healthcare staff.

Relevance to Clinical Practice. Nurses need to provide support for significant others as well as good caring for the patients and this requires a profound understanding of significant others from their own perspective.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2007. Vol. 16, no 7b, p. 215-222
Keywords [en]
chronic illness, diabetes, nurses, nursing, significant others, qualitative
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-3892DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2702.2007.01797.xScopus ID: 2-s2.0-34250724869OAI: oai:DiVA.org:mdh-3892DiVA, id: diva2:116556
Available from: 2007-12-19 Created: 2007-12-19 Last updated: 2015-06-30Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
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Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
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  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
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