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Ambivalent sexism and system justification in an egalitarian country
Mälardalen University, Department of Social Sciences.
2007 (English)In: Annual Meeting of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, Memphis, 2007, 2007, p. 141-Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Ambivalent sexism consists of complementary hostile and benevolent beliefs toward women and men, assumed to function as part of a system justifying ideology. The present study was the first validating a Swedish translation of the Ambivalent Sexism Inventory (Glick & Fiske, 1996), as well as investigating the link between System Justification and complementary gender stereotypes. Both women and men in this community sample dissociated themselves from sexist ideas. Interestingly, women disagreed to a greater extent with benevolent items than hostile items. There were gender differences in a number of scales: men scored higher on Benevolent and Hostile Sexism, Old-fashioned and Modern sexism (Swim, Aikin, Hall & Hunter, 1995), System Justification (Jost & Banaji, 1994; scale adapted from Kay & Jost, 2003), and placed their political stance more to the right than women. Women identified more strongly as feminists than men. A suggested link between system justification and the belief in complementary gender stereotypes (e.g., Glick & Fiske, 1997, 2001) could not be confirmed. The social democratic view prevailing in Sweden was confirmed by participants’ average political stance tending towards the left, and a moderate correlation between political stance and system justification; those with a more leftist political stance tended to believe that the system is more just. Participants with a right-wing political stance also tended to hold more sexist attitudes, although patterns diverged between male and female participants. In sum, the results highlight the cultural specificity of a “feminine” country with a social welfare state emphasizing gender equality.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2007. p. 141-
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-3423OAI: oai:DiVA.org:mdh-3423DiVA, id: diva2:116087
Available from: 2007-04-20 Created: 2007-04-20

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CiteExportLink to record
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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
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Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf