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Attributional biases about the origins of preferences in a group-decision situation.
Mälardalen University, Department of Social Sciences.
2007 (English)In: The 2007 SPSP Group processes and Intergroup Relations preconference, Memphis, 2007, 2007Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Attributional bias between groups has been shown to exist when group-boundaries are composed of attitudes that are self-defining (Kenworthy & Miller, 2002). We wanted to see if attributional bias between groups would exist when the attitude issue separating the groups was not self-defining. Further, we wanted to see whether a decision of the issue would affect attributional bias. This was done in an experiment where participants, high-school students, read about a hypothetical situation where a decision was to be made. The decision would affect the school’s students, but was not considered self-defining. The participants stated their preferred outcome of the decision. Outcome was manipulated to be either concordant or discordant with participants´ preferences. Further, decision-making form varied so that in one condition, participants were informed that in-group authorities (student representatives) had made the final decision, and in the other condition, the decision was made by out-group authorities (the principal and teachers). Results showed that attributional bias was present when attitude issue was not self-defining. When outcome supported preferred alternative, attributional bias was stronger. Being part of the winning side, that is the high-status group, provides self-validation and increases self-esteem (Tyler, 1994 ). This interpretation is supported by further analysis showing that high self-esteem was related to more attributional bias. Attributional bias was stronger when the decision was made by in-group authorities as compared to out-group authorities. When in-group members make a decision, attributional bias may increase as a function of in-group identification, which provides information about self-worth (Smith & Tyler, 1997).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2007.
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-3422OAI: oai:DiVA.org:mdh-3422DiVA, id: diva2:116086
Available from: 2007-04-20 Created: 2007-04-20

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
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  • de-DE
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  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
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Output format
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