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Simulation of energy balance and carbon dioxide emission for microalgae introduction in wastewater treatment plants
Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3131-0285
Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center. (ACWA)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-0861-6438
Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3485-5440
Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-0300-0762
2017 (English)In: Algal Research, ISSN 2211-9264, Vol. 24, no part A, p. 251-260Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A case study is described in which the activated sludge process is replaced with a microalgae-activated sludge process. The effects on the heat and electricity consumption and carbon dioxide emissions were evaluated in a system model, based on mass and energy balances of biological treatment and sludge handling process steps. Data for use in the model was gathered from three wastewater treatment plants in Sweden. The evaluation showed that the introduction of microalgae could reduce electricity and heat consumption as well as CO2 emissions but would require large land areas. The study concludes that a 12-fold increase in the basin surface area would result in reductions of 26–35% in electricity consumption, 7–32% in heat consumption and 22–54% in carbon dioxide emissions. This process may be suitable for wastewater treatment plants in Nordic countries, where there is a higher organic load in summer than at other times of the year. During the summer period (May to August) electricity consumption was reduced by 50–68%, heat consumption was reduced by 13–63% and carbon dioxide emissions were reduced by 43–103%.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 24, no part A, p. 251-260
National Category
Energy Systems
Research subject
Energy- and Environmental Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-36513DOI: 10.1016/j.algal.2017.03.026ISI: 000404864600025Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85017531839OAI: oai:DiVA.org:mdh-36513DiVA, id: diva2:1144533
Funder
Knowledge FoundationAvailable from: 2017-09-26 Created: 2017-09-26 Last updated: 2018-03-05Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. System studies of Anaerobic Co-digestion Processes
Open this publication in new window or tab >>System studies of Anaerobic Co-digestion Processes
2017 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Production of biogas through anaerobic digestion is one pathway to achieving the European Union (EU) goals of reducing greenhouse gas emissions, increasing the share of renewable energy, and improving energy efficiency. In this thesis, two different models (Anaerobic Digestion Model No. 1 and an artificial neural network) are used to simulate a full-scale co-digester in order to evaluate the feasibility of such models. This thesis also includes models of two systems to study the inclusion of microalgae in biogas plants and wastewater treatment plants. One of the studies is a life-cycle assessment in which replacement of the ley crop with microalgae is evaluated. The other study concerns the inclusion of microalgae in case studies of biological treatment in three wastewater treatment plants. Finally, the co-digestion between microalgae and sewage sludge has been simulated to evaluate the effect on biogas and methane yield. The results showed that Anaerobic Digestion Model No.1 and the artificial neural network are suitable for replicating the dynamics of a full-scale co-digestion plant. For the tested period, the artificial neural network showed a better fit for biogas and methane content than the Anaerobic Digestion Model No. 1. Simulations showed that co-digestion with microalgae tended to reduce biomethane production. However, this depended on the species and biodegradability of the microalgae. The results also showed that inclusion of microalgae could decrease carbon dioxide emissions in both types of plants and decrease the energy demand of the studied wastewater treatment plants. The extent of the decrease in the wastewater treatment plants depended on surface volume. In the biogas plant, the inclusion of microalgae led to a lower net energy ratio for the methane compared to when using ley crop silage. Both studies show that microalgae cultivation is best suited for use in summer in the northern climate.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Västerås: Mälardalen University Press, 2017
Series
Mälardalen University Press Dissertations, ISSN 1651-4238 ; 237
National Category
Bioenergy
Research subject
Energy- and Environmental Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-36515 (URN)978-91-7485-347-6 (ISBN)
Public defence
2017-11-08, Case, Västerås, 09:15 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2017-09-27 Created: 2017-09-26 Last updated: 2017-12-27Bibliographically approved

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The full text will be freely available from 2019-04-13 00:00
Available from 2019-04-13 00:00

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