mdh.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
You Call me a Bitch Like It's a Bad Thing: A Study into the Current Use and Semantic Properties of the Noun Bitch
Mälardalen University, School of Education, Culture and Communication.
2017 (English)Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

This paper analyses and discusses the present-day use of the noun bitch, as the term in contemporary usage seems to have started to deviate from the lexical definition. Traditionally considered an insult when applied to a woman, bitch has recently started being used as a self-imposed label rather than an applied one. Such a phenomenon indicates reappropriation, a negotiation of the meaning and semantics of a word. The purpose of this study is to investigate the origin and semantics of the term, as well as its historical usage and developments. Of particular interest and significance regarding the semantic development of bitch are social and extra-linguistic factors such as political movements, as will be evident from the results presented. Additionally, the present-day use of the term is analysed using lexical semantics and corpus linguistics, with the adjective collocates of the term retrieved from two corpora. Further, contemporary music lyrics are quoted and analysed to lend further support to the corpus findings regarding the present-day use, as well as the indicated semantic change and reappropriation. The results indicate that the term bitch is undergoing a reappropriation and is currently used both as a derogatory and self-empowering term. It is hoped that this paper will give insight to the phenomenon of reappropriation and the connection between social and linguistic change, as well as the importance of context in determining the meaning of a term.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. , 0 p.
Keyword [en]
lexical semantics, semantic prosody, semantic change, corpus linguistics, reappropriation
National Category
Specific Languages General Language Studies and Linguistics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-35941OAI: oai:DiVA.org:mdh-35941DiVA: diva2:1115312
Subject / course
English
Supervisors
Examiners
Available from: 2017-07-05 Created: 2017-06-26 Last updated: 2017-07-05Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(614 kB)15 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 614 kBChecksum SHA-512
8c29ac53c011ecd91d378427643c0bef423560f5bf05939caa51af1bc9d558ce70f0956a7351cf1cc7590eb002183373731190a56d17b62f8cbae107d13ccf19
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

By organisation
School of Education, Culture and Communication
Specific LanguagesGeneral Language Studies and Linguistics

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 15 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

Total: 45 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf