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Job Resources to Promote Feelings of Pride in the Organization: The Role of Social Identification
Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
(English)Article in journal (Refereed) Submitted
Abstract [en]

Employees are assumed to obtain job resources from and identify with the organization they work for. Previously, the concepts of job resources and social identification have mostly been studied holistically, that is, on one general organizational level. This study contributes to the understanding of how job resources, operationalized at two different levels in two organizations, influence the amount of group-based pride that employees feel for their workgroups and for their organizations. Social identification is purported to intervene in this relationship on respective level, and its inclusion is expected to contribute to different kinds of pride. Regression analyses of questionnaire data gathered from 436 employees in two middle-sized municipalities in Sweden revealed that: (1) a workgroup’s resources and identification explained additional variance in workgroup pride beyond the effects of resources and identification at the organizational level, (2) leader and organizational resources and identification explained additional variance in organizational pride beyond that of workgroup resources and identification, and (3) social identification in both these areas partially mediated these relationships. Theoretical contributions include the addition of emotional outcomes of job resources and that these effects are foci-specific. This emphasizes the need to distinguish between workgroup and organizational levels regarding both independent and dependent variables. The clarification of the multiple identifications and group-based pride dynamics that exist has practical implications for Human Resource (HR) managers.

Keyword [en]
job resources, social identification, dual identification, group-based emotions, pride
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Working Life Studies
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-35281OAI: oai:DiVA.org:mdh-35281DiVA: diva2:1092568
Available from: 2017-05-03 Created: 2017-05-03 Last updated: 2017-05-08Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Trust issues: Welfare workers' relationship to their organisation
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Trust issues: Welfare workers' relationship to their organisation
2017 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

In the past decades, the public sector has undergone important organisational policy changes, referred to as New Public Management. These management strategies focus on continuous cost improvements and rationalisation of operations. In the aftermath of these policy changes, we have seen reports of increased work demands and less professional autonomy amongst welfare workers. Against this background, the thesis sets out to explore welfare workers’ relationship to their organisation. This was done by investigating how psychosocial and organisational factors related to a number of outcomes assumed to be indicators of the quality of the relationship. Theoretically, the thesis was inspired by psychological contract theory, but also relates to other concepts and theories found in organisational research. The thesis is based on four empirical studies, all of which relate to how welfare workers have perceived their relationship to their organisation.

Study I aimed to qualitatively investigate how turnover processes evolved amongst statutory social workers who voluntarily had resigned from their jobs. The results showed that dismissive/admonishing organisational responses to the social workers’ perceived work-related dissatisfactions reinforced their beliefs in psychological contract violation, which led to resignation.

Study II and III employed national web-based questionnaire data collected from employees and managers in the social services. The results of Studies II-III showed that if organisations want welfare workers to stop considering exit, want to counteract silence, want to reduce stress-related ill health and want to improve organisational commitment and job satisfaction, management strategies need to be developed that lead to fewer conflicting demands, a reasonable workload and a greater professional autonomy. The results also showed that the organisation’s open climate and attitude towards employees was of great importance for the studied outcome variables.

Study IV was based on questionnaire data from different occupational groups in two municipal organisations. The results showed that organisational resources explained additional variance in organisational identification and organisational pride, beyond the contributions of workgroup resources.

From the findings of this thesis, it can be concluded that the psychosocial demands need to be balanced with organisational resources in order to (re)build a trustworthy employee-organisation relationship. Further, organisations need to reconsider their human resource management strategies and practices, e.g., by enabling a continuous and open dialogue between the strategic and operational levels. Such changes may lead to balanced psychological contracts between welfare workers and the organisation that can improve the organisation’s stability, continuity and, ultimately, the quality of the welfare services.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Västerås: Mälardalen University, 2017
Series
Mälardalen University Press Dissertations, ISSN 1651-4238 ; 231
Keyword
employee-organisation relationship, new public management, psychological contracts, job demands, job resources, organisational factors, trust
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Working Life Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-35282 (URN)978-91-7485-330-8 (ISBN)
Public defence
2017-06-20, Beta, Mälardalens högskola, Västerås, 13:00 (Swedish)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2017-05-05 Created: 2017-05-03 Last updated: 2017-07-10Bibliographically approved

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