mdh.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Autopsy goes rogue: a theatrical experiment on method
Manchester Metropolitan University, UK.
Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona, USA.
University of Valle d’Aosta, Aosta, Italy.
, Sheffield Institute of Education, Sheffield Hallam University, UK.
Show others and affiliations
2017 (English)Conference paper, Presentation (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

A (mis)organized stream at a recent academic conference adopted a post-qualitative (in)sensibility in experimenting with how intentionally non-normative practices (more properly practicings) and a play with material objects might disrupt the smoothness of the academicconferencemachine.  One such experiment witnessed the re-assembly of fragmented male doll parts, previously distributed throughout the conference space, onto an ‘autopsy table’.  The autopsy table became a creative participatory theatre for/of doll parts that adopted a range of vital poses and shapes through/out the life of the conference – despite the absence of direction or instruction.  In this instance, the autopsy table featured more like its use in forensic anthropology than that in medical pathology.  This autopsy table was a site of epistemological re-assembly, of putting together thoughts, senses, and practices rather than –as well as by – cutting apart.

In the proposed session, we re-turn the autopsy table and eschew the idea of ‘the paper’ in the first instance.  Instead, the presentation/performance/experiment/workshop explores the groping, creative assemblages and unpredictable onto-epistemological productivities available through the autopsy table – as a site of assembly and as metaphor – in thinking differently about what social science methods do, claim to do, and might want to do.  Participants – invited to the table to co-produce – will be asked to do so without the benefit of omniscient methodological directionality or ‘full sight’: positioned behind operating screens, and working with a range of materials out of sight.  Participants will thus be asked to rely on the wider bodily sensorium: on touch, on sound, on smell, on affect. 

The autopsy table encounters envisioned owe a deeply ingrained debt to ‘the cut’: a familiar mainstay of mainstream social sciences that fabricates knowledge through the rigours of dissection, segmentation, conceptualisation, observation, operationalisation, bracketing and other technologies of control and separation.  However, the envisioned autopsical practicings also take seriously and experiment with Barad’s reworking ‘the cut’ as an enactment of contingent rather than absolute separation – of cutting together apart. Our experimentation draws on new materialist and posthuman theories that conceive phenomena as connected entities, emerging from cuts that never produce absolute separation. Phenomena, practices, and processes emerge at the intersection of politics of academic conferences, singular plural, fragmented models and incompletely and messy practising of inquiry, objects imbued with desire, discourses, history and culture. In Law’s (2004) terms the session enacts a ‘method assemblage’ that takes seriously the generative flux of the elusive and ephemeral world that we claim to know through the matrix of method.  The session instantiates a movement from (and threading through of) methodological fabrication toward an enacted stuttering and stammering ‘fabulation’ (Deleuze via O’Sullivan, 2016) for becoming (un)knowing.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017.
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-35262OAI: oai:DiVA.org:mdh-35262DiVA: diva2:1091523
Conference
After method in organization studies III
Available from: 2017-04-26 Created: 2017-04-26 Last updated: 2017-05-03Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Cozza, Michela
By organisation
Industrial Economics and Organisation
Business Administration

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Total: 10 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf