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The relation between the fear-avoidance model and constructs from the social cognitive theory in acute WAD
Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-1912-3110
Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-7157-7259
Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4537-030X
2016 (English)In: Pain Research & Management, ISSN 1203-6765, E-ISSN 1918-1523, Vol. 2016, 8281926Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In the fear-avoidance (FA) model social cognitive constructs could add to explaining the disabling process in whiplash associated disorder (WAD). The aim was to exemplify the possible input from Social Cognitive Theory on the FA model.Specifically the role of functional self-efficacy and perceived responses from a spouse/intimate partner was studied. A cross-sectional and correlational design was used. Data from 64 patients with acute WAD were used. Measures were pain intensity measured with a numerical rating scale, the Pain Disability Index, support, punishing responses, solicitous responses, and distracting responses subscales from the Multidimensional Pain Inventory, the Catastrophizing subscale from the Coping Strategies Questionnaire, the Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia, and the Self-Efficacy Scale. Bivariate correlational, simple linear regression, and multiple regression analyses were used. In the statistical prediction models high pain intensity indicated high punishing responses, which indicated high catastrophizing. High catastrophizing indicated high fear of movement, which indicated low self-efficacy. Low self-efficacy indicated high disability, which indicated high pain intensity. All independent variables together explained 66.4% of the variance in pain disability, p < 0.001. Results suggest a possible link between one aspect of the social environment, perceived punishing responses from a spouse/intimate partner, pain intensity, and catastrophizing. Further, results support a mediating role of self-efficacy between fear of movement and disability in WAD.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 2016, 8281926
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-34532DOI: 10.1155/2016/8281926ISI: 000389457800001Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85003587522OAI: oai:DiVA.org:mdh-34532DiVA: diva2:1059213
Available from: 2016-12-22 Created: 2016-12-22 Last updated: 2016-12-29Bibliographically approved

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Sandborgh, MariaJohansson, Ann_ChristinSöderlund, Anne
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CiteExportLink to record
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Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
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  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
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  • nn-NO
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More languages
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