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Using slaughterhouse waste in a biochemical-based biorefinery – results from pilot scale tests
Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-5014-3275
Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3485-5440
Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-8268-1967
Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2189-0105
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2017 (English)In: Environmental technology, ISSN 0959-3330, E-ISSN 1479-487X, 1275-1284 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A novel biorefinery concept was piloted using protein-rich slaughterhouse waste, chicken manureand straw as feedstocks. The basic idea was to provide a proof of concept for the production ofplatform chemicals and biofuels from organic waste materials at non-septic conditions. Thedesired biochemical routes were 2,3-butanediol and acetone–butanol fermentation. The resultsshowed that hydrolysis resulted only in low amounts of easily degradable carbohydrates.However, amino acids released from the protein-rich slaughterhouse waste were utilized andfermented by the bacteria in the process. Product formation was directed towards acidogeniccompounds rather than solventogenic products due to increasing pH-value affected by ammoniarelease during amino acid fermentation. Hence, the process was not effective for 2,3-butanediolproduction, whereas butyrate, propionate,γ-aminobutyrate and valerate were predominantlyproduced. This offered fast means for converting tedious protein-rich waste mixtures intoutilizable chemical goods. Furthermore, the residual liquid from the bioreactor showedsignificantly higher biogas production potential than the corresponding substrates. Thecombination of the biorefinery approach to produce chemicals and biofuels with anaerobicdigestion of the residues to recover energy in form of methane and nutrients that can beutilized for animal feed production could be a feasible concept for organic waste utilization.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. 1275-1284 p.
Keyword [en]
Platform chemicals; biofuels; anaerobic digestion; fermentation; organic waste
National Category
Bioprocess Technology
Research subject
Energy- and Environmental Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-33516DOI: 10.1080/09593330.2016.1225128ISI: 000398961100008OAI: oai:DiVA.org:mdh-33516DiVA: diva2:1045384
Projects
ABOWE
Funder
EU, European Research Council, 2007CB163PO02
Available from: 2016-11-09 Created: 2016-11-09 Last updated: 2017-05-19Bibliographically approved

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Schwede, SebastianThorin, EvaLindmark, JohanKlintenberg, Patrik
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