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Elevated CO2 effects on Zn and Fe nutrition in vegetables: A meta-analysis
Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-3135-6088
Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences,Sweden.
Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences,Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-6688-3702
Mälardalen University, School of Business, Society and Engineering, Future Energy Center.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-5480-0167
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2024 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration has been progressively increasing since the onset of the Industrial Revolution and has already reached at around 420 μmol mol⁻¹ nowadays. It is well recognized that elevated CO2 concentration stimulates the yield for C3 crops, but it also simultaneously changes the essential nutrients. However, compared with the main crops, far less attention has been devoted to the effects of elevated CO2 concentration on vegetable growth and quality. Vegetables are highly recommended in daily diets due to their diverse range of beneficial compounds, such as vitamins, antioxidants, minerals, and dietary fiber.  In controlled greenhouse vegetable cultivation, elevated CO2 has been widely adopted as an agricultural practice for enhancing plant growth. Thus, understanding both vegetable growth and nutrient status is crucial to assess the potential impacts of elevated CO2 on future food security in both natural and controlled environments. However, much more attention has been paid to biomass enhancement, and elevated CO2 effects on nutrient quality are less recognized. Among the nutrients, Zinc (Zn) and Iron (Fe) are essential elements in humans. Previous studies have demonstrated a decreasing trend of Zn and Fe in main crops such as wheat and rice with increased CO2, while less is known about whether this alleviation effect on Zn and Fe can apply to vegetables. Therefore, a meta-analysis was conducted in this study to evaluate the influence of elevated CO2 concentration in the atmosphere on vegetable Fe and Zn status, and quantify the potential impact of future climate on nutrition security.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2024.
National Category
Energy Engineering
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URN: urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-66385DOI: 10.5194/egusphere-egu24-18543OAI: oai:DiVA.org:mdh-66385DiVA, id: diva2:1849438
Conference
EGU24, Vienna, Austria & Online, 14–19 April 2024
Available from: 2024-04-08 Created: 2024-04-08 Last updated: 2024-04-08Bibliographically approved

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Wang, XiaolinOdlare, MonicaSkvaril, Jan

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