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Vincze, Mattias
Publications (3 of 3) Show all publications
Nordgren, L., Arvidsson, A., Vincze, M. & Asp, M. (2021). Photo-elicited conversations as a tool for engagement in people with dementia: An observational study. In: : . Paper presented at 4th Nordic Conference in Nursing Research, Copenhagen, Denmark, 2021-10-04 – 2021-10-06.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Photo-elicited conversations as a tool for engagement in people with dementia: An observational study
2021 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-56238 (URN)
Conference
4th Nordic Conference in Nursing Research, Copenhagen, Denmark, 2021-10-04 – 2021-10-06
Available from: 2021-10-15 Created: 2021-10-15 Last updated: 2022-11-25Bibliographically approved
Vincze, M., Fredriksson, L. & Wiklund Gustin, L. (2015). To do good might hurt bad: Exploring nurses' understanding and approach to suffering in forensic psychiatric settings. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, 24(2), 149-157
Open this publication in new window or tab >>To do good might hurt bad: Exploring nurses' understanding and approach to suffering in forensic psychiatric settings
2015 (English)In: International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1445-8330, E-ISSN 1447-0349, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 149-157Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Patients in forensic psychiatric settings not only have to deal with their mental illness, but also memories of criminal activities and being involuntarily hospitalized. The aim of the present study was to explore how nurses working in forensic psychiatric services understand and approach patients' experiences of suffering. Data were generated by semistructured interviews with psychiatric nurses from two different forensic psychiatric units in Sweden. Data were analysed by means of a hermeneutic approach inspired by Ricoeur's hermeneutics. The findings are reflected in four main themes: (i) ignoring suffering; (ii) explaining suffering as a natural and inevitable part of daily life in the forensic context; (iii) ascribing meaning to suffering; and, (iv) being present in suffering. To engage in alleviating suffering is a struggle that demands courage and the strength to reflect on its character and consequences. To encounter suffering means that nurses are not only confronted with patients' suffering, but also their own reactions to those patients. If suffering is not recognized or encountered, there is a risk that actions may have a negative impact on patients.

Keywords
Caring, Forensic psychiatry, Nurse-patient relationship, Psychiatric nursing, Suffering, Trust
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-27837 (URN)10.1111/inm.12116 (DOI)000352529700008 ()2-s2.0-84926419225 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-04-16 Created: 2015-04-16 Last updated: 2021-01-12Bibliographically approved
Nordgren, L., Arvidsson, A., Vincze, M. & Asp, M. Photo-elicited conversations about meetings with a therapy dog as a tool for communication in dementia care: An observational study. Dementia
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Photo-elicited conversations about meetings with a therapy dog as a tool for communication in dementia care: An observational study
(English)In: Dementia, ISSN 1471-3012, E-ISSN 1741-2684Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Introduction: It is well-known that people with dementia living in residential care facilities spend most of their time not engaged in meaningful activities. Being involved in activities can improve their quality of life. Animal-assisted therapy is an activity that can evoke engagement and joy. Another way to create engagement and promote communication between people with dementia and caregivers is to use photos.

Methods: In this observational study, the researchers combined animal-assisted therapy and photobooks in order to explore whether photos of people with dementia who were engaged in animal-assisted therapy could be used as a tool for communication in dementia care. Ten persons (4 men and 6 women; aged 72-92) with dementia were video recorded during photo-elicited conversations with a dog handler/assistant nurse. The recordings were conducted in two residential care facilities in Sweden during 2017-2018. Each participant was video recorded 2-4 times. The recordings were analysed using The Observed Emotion Rating Scale and The Observational Measurement of Engagement-OME Modified. In addition, the video recordings were interpreted from a hermeneutic perspective.

Findings: The findings showed that the most frequently observed effects were pleasure and general alertness, and the participants were observed to be attentive most of the time. The most common attitude during the conversations was 'somewhat positive'. The hermeneutic interpretations were grouped into four themes: Conveys a structure for the conversation with an inherent beginning and ending; An opportunity to recognise oneself and recall a sense of belonging; Awakens emotions and creates fellowship and Entails confirmation and revitalises their identity.

Conclusion: Photobooks can be used by caregivers as a tool for meaningful and joyful communication with people with dementia, even those with severe dementia.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications
Keywords
dementia, observation, video recording, qualitative research, animal-assisted therapy
National Category
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-59802 (URN)10.1177/14713012221118214 (DOI)000837360400001 ()35939407 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85135774822 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-08-25 Created: 2022-08-25 Last updated: 2022-11-17Bibliographically approved
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