mdh.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
von Thiele Schwarz, UlricaORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-4771-8349
Publications (10 of 73) Show all publications
Richter, A., Lornudd, C., von Thiele Schwarz, U., Lundmark, R., Mosson, R., Eskner Skoger, U., . . . Hasson, H. (2020). Evaluation of iLead, a generic implementation leadership intervention: mixed-method preintervention-postintervention design. BMJ Open, 10(1)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evaluation of iLead, a generic implementation leadership intervention: mixed-method preintervention-postintervention design
Show others...
2020 (English)In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 10, no 1Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES: The present study aimed to evaluate the iLead intervention and to investigate whether or not transfer of training can be supported by contextualising the intervention (recruiting all managers from one branch of the organisation while focusing on one implementation case, as well as training senior management). DESIGN: A pre-evaluation-postevaluation design was applied using mixed methods with process and effect surveys and interviews to measure the effects on three levels. SETTING: Healthcare managers from Stockholm's regional healthcare organisation were invited to the training. PARTICIPANTS: 52 managers participated in the iLead intervention. Group 1 consisted of 21 managers from different organisations and with different implementation cases. Group 2, representing the contextualised group, consisted of 31 managers from the same organisation, working on the same implementation case, where senior management also received training. INTERVENTION: iLead is an intervention where healthcare managers are trained in implementation leadership based on the full-range leadership model. PRIMARY OUTCOME MEASURES: Reactions, knowledge and implementation leadership are measured. RESULTS: Quantitative and qualitative analyses indicate that iLead was perceived to be of high quality and capable of increasing participants' knowledge. Mixed effects were found regarding changes in behaviours. The contextualisation did not have a boosting effect on behaviour change. Hence, group 2 did not increase its active implementation leadership in comparison with group 1. CONCLUSIONS: iLead introduces a new approach to how implementation leadership can be trained when knowledge of effective leadership for implementations is combined with findings on the importance of environmental factors for the transfer of training. Even though managers reported general positive effects, transfer was not facilitated through the contextualisation of the intervention. There is a need to further develop approaches to help participants subsequently apply the learnt skills in their work environment. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
NLM (Medline), 2020
National Category
Computer Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-46793 (URN)10.1136/bmjopen-2019-033227 (DOI)2-s2.0-85077785749 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-01-23 Created: 2020-01-23 Last updated: 2020-01-23Bibliographically approved
Tafvelin, S., Hasson, H., Holmstrom, S. & von Thiele Schwarz, U. (2019). Are Formal Leaders the Only Ones Benefitting From Leadership Training?: A Shared Leadership Perspective. Journal of leadership & organizational studies, 26(1), 32-43
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Are Formal Leaders the Only Ones Benefitting From Leadership Training?: A Shared Leadership Perspective
2019 (English)In: Journal of leadership & organizational studies, ISSN 1548-0518, E-ISSN 1939-7089, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 32-43Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Leadership training most often involves training of formal leaders, and little is known about the potential benefits of leadership training for other members of an organization. Using theories of shared leadership, the current study examined outcomes of transformational leadership training that targets both formal and informal leaders (i.e., both vertical and shared leadership). The training was set in a Swedish paper pulp factory and involved formal and informal leaders participating in 20 days of training over a period of 16 months. Based on employee survey data collected both pre- and postintervention our analyses revealed that both formal and informal leaders significantly improved their transformational leadership behaviors. Interestingly, the improvement in transformational leadership behaviors of formal and informal leaders tended to predict employee efficiency and well-being in different ways. Improvements in formal leaders' transformational leadership were related to employee well-being, while informal leaders' increases in transformational leadership were associated with efficiency. The results point toward the benefit of a shared leadership perspective on leadership training and indicate that improvements in transformational leadership may affect employees differently depending on who in the organization displays them.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SAGE PUBLICATIONS INC, 2019
Keywords
shared leadership, transformational leadership, leadership training, efficiency, well-being
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-42324 (URN)10.1177/1548051818774552 (DOI)000454595600003 ()2-s2.0-85046747123 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-01-17 Created: 2019-01-17 Last updated: 2019-11-12
Mosson, R., Augustsson, H., Bäck, A., Åhström, M., von Thiele Schwarz, U., Richter, J., . . . Hasson, H. (2019). Building implementation capacity (BIC): A longitudinal mixed methods evaluation of a team intervention. BMC Health Services Research, 19(1), Article ID 287.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Building implementation capacity (BIC): A longitudinal mixed methods evaluation of a team intervention
Show others...
2019 (English)In: BMC Health Services Research, ISSN 1472-6963, E-ISSN 1472-6963, Vol. 19, no 1, article id 287Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Managers and professionals in health and social care are required to implement evidence-based methods. Despite this, they generally lack training in implementation. In clinical settings, implementation is often a team effort, so it calls for team training. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of the Building Implementation Capacity (BIC) intervention that targets teams of professionals, including their managers. Methods: A non-randomized design was used, with two intervention cases (each consisting of two groups). The longitudinal, mixed-methods evaluation included pre-post and workshop-evaluation questionnaires, and interviews following Kirkpatrick's four-level evaluation framework. The intervention was delivered in five workshops, using a systematic implementation method with exercises and practical working materials. To improve transfer of training, the teams' managers were included. Practical experiences were combined with theoretical knowledge, social interactions, reflections, and peer support. Results: Overall, the participants were satisfied with the intervention (first level), and all groups increased their self-rated implementation knowledge (second level). The qualitative results indicated that most participants applied what they had learned by enacting new implementation behaviors (third level). However, they only partially applied the implementation method, as they did not use the planned systematic approach. A few changes in organizational results occurred (fourth level). Conclusions: The intervention had positive effects with regard to the first two levels of the evaluation model; that is, the participants were satisfied with the intervention and improved their knowledge and skills. Some positive changes also occurred on the third level (behaviors) and fourth level (organizational results), but these were not as clear as the results for the first two levels. This highlights the fact that further optimization is needed to improve transfer of training when building teams' implementation capacity. In addition to considering the design of such interventions, the organizational context and the participants' characteristics may also need to be considered to maximize the chances that the learned skills will be successfully transferred to behaviors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central Ltd., 2019
Keywords
Learning, Managers, Skills training, Tailored implementation, Work groups, adult, article, controlled study, exercise, female, human, human experiment, interview, male, manager, peer group, questionnaire, skill, social interaction, theoretical study, transfer of learning
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-43499 (URN)10.1186/s12913-019-4086-1 (DOI)000467410800001 ()31064362 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85065478982 (Scopus ID)
Note

Export Date: 24 May 2019; Article; Correspondence Address: Hasson, H.; Department of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics, Medical Management Centre, Karolinska Institutet, Tomtebodavägen 18a, Sweden; email: henna.hasson@ki.se

Available from: 2019-06-11 Created: 2019-06-11 Last updated: 2019-11-12
Tafvelin, S., von Thiele Schwarz, U., Nielsen, K. & Hasson, H. (2019). Employees' and line managers' active involvement in participatory organizational interventions: Examining direct, reversed, and reciprocal effects on well-being. Stress and Health, 35(1), 69-80
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Employees' and line managers' active involvement in participatory organizational interventions: Examining direct, reversed, and reciprocal effects on well-being
2019 (English)In: Stress and Health, ISSN 1532-3005, E-ISSN 1532-2998, Vol. 35, no 1, p. 69-80Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study examined how employee participation and perceptions of line managers' support during a participatory organizational intervention were related to well-being over time. Although previous studies suggest that employees' and managers' active involvement in participatory organizational interventions may be related to well-being, little is known about the temporal aspects, such as at which time during the intervention these factors matter, or possible reciprocal effects. Building on conservation of resources theory, we tested hypotheses concerning direct, reversed, and reciprocal relationships between employee participation and perceptions of line manager support in relation to well-being. We used a four-wave panel design consisting of 159 hospital workers. Cross-lagged analyses showed that perceived line managers' support in the initiation and active phase was related to participation in the active phase. Participation in the initiation and active phase was related to well-being in the active and sustained phase, respectively. Results also revealed that participation in the initiation phase was related to perceived line managers' support in the active phase, which in turn predicted participation in the active phase, which translated into job satisfaction in the sustained phase supporting reversed and reciprocal effects in the form of resource caravans. Theoretical implications for research and practice are discussed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY, 2019
Keywords
employee participation, participatory organizational interventions, perceived line managers' support, temporal perspective
National Category
Work Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-42882 (URN)10.1002/smi.2841 (DOI)000459168400007 ()30303299 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85056103677 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-03-07 Created: 2019-03-07 Last updated: 2019-11-12
Aarons, G. A., Seijo, C., Green, A. E., Moullin, J. C., Hasson, H., von Thiele Schwarz, U., . . . Willging, C. (2019). Fostering international collaboration in implementation science and research: A concept mapping exploratory study. BMC Research Notes, 12(1), Article ID 778.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fostering international collaboration in implementation science and research: A concept mapping exploratory study
Show others...
2019 (English)In: BMC Research Notes, ISSN 1756-0500, E-ISSN 1756-0500, Vol. 12, no 1, article id 778Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: International collaboration in science has received increasing attention given emphases on relevance, generalizability, and impact of research. Implementation science (IS) is a growing discipline that aims to translate clinical research findings into health services. Research is needed to identify efficient and effective ways to foster international collaboration in IS. Concept-mapping (CM) was utilized with a targeted sample for preliminary exploration of fostering international collaboration. Concept-mapping is a mixed-method approach (qualitative/quantitative) particularly suited for identifying essential themes and action items to facilitate planning among diverse stakeholders. We sought to identify key factors likely to facilitate productive and rewarding international collaborations in implementation research. Results: We identified eleven dimensions: Strategic Planning; Practicality; Define Common Principles; Technological Tools for Collaboration; Funding; Disseminate Importance of Fostering International Collaboration in IS; Knowledge Sharing; Innovative & Adaptive Research; Training IS Researchers; Networking & Shared Identity; Facilitate Meetings. Strategic Planning and Funding were highest rated for importance and Strategic Planning and Networking and Shared Identity were rated most feasible to institute. Fostering international collaboration in IS can accelerate the efficiency, relevance, and generalizability of implementation research. Strategies should be developed and tested to improve international collaborations and engage junior and experienced investigators in collaborations advancing implementation science and practice. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central Ltd., 2019
Keywords
Collaboration, Concept mapping, Dissemination, Implementation, International, Mixed-methods, Qualitative, Quantitative, Team science
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-46307 (URN)10.1186/s13104-019-4800-4 (DOI)2-s2.0-85075800045 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-12-12 Created: 2019-12-12 Last updated: 2019-12-12Bibliographically approved
Tafvelin, S., von Thiele Schwarz, U. & Stenling, A. (2019). Leadership training to increase need satisfaction at work: A quasi-experimental mixed method study. Frontiers in Psychology, 10(SEP), Article ID 2175.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Leadership training to increase need satisfaction at work: A quasi-experimental mixed method study
2019 (English)In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 10, no SEP, article id 2175Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

With a growing number of studies showing the applicability of the self-determination theory for various work and organizational outcomes, the next logical step is to investigate if and how employee need satisfaction at work can be purposefully increased through an intervention. The purpose of the present study was to test whether we could train managers’ display of autonomy, competence, and relatedness support toward employees and whether this resulted in improved employee need satisfaction, well-being, and job performance. Data were obtained from 37 managers (rated by N = 538 subordinates) assigned to either an experimental or control condition at three time points: before, during, and after the training. We also used focus group interviews to evaluate the experience of the training. The quantitative analyses showed no statistically significant improvement in managers’ display of needs support or employee need satisfaction. However, the qualitative data pointed toward important factors related to the implementation of need supportive leadership training that should be considered. © 2019 Tafvelin, von Thiele Schwarz and Stenling.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2019
Keywords
Basic psychological needs theory, Focus group interviews, Leadership training, Need support, Quasi-experimental design, Self-determination theory
National Category
Work Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-45581 (URN)10.3389/fpsyg.2019.02175 (DOI)000487607100001 ()2-s2.0-85073027692 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-10-17 Created: 2019-10-17 Last updated: 2019-12-12
Tafvelin, S., Nielsen, K., Abildgaard, J. S., Richter, A., von Thiele Schwarz, U. & Hasson, H. (2019). Leader-team perceptual distance affects outcomes of leadership training: Examining safety leadership and follower safety self-efficacy. Safety Science, 120, 25-31
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Leader-team perceptual distance affects outcomes of leadership training: Examining safety leadership and follower safety self-efficacy
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Safety Science, ISSN 0925-7535, E-ISSN 1879-1042, Vol. 120, p. 25-31Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Whether leaders and their teams agree or not on perceptions of leadership has been found to impact follower well-being and performance. Less is known about how agreements or disagreements play a role in relation to safety and leadership training. The present study examined the effects of leaders’ and followers’ perceptual distance on safety leadership prior to a leadership safety training. Forty-eight leaders and a total of 211 followers from the paper industry completed surveys before and after training. Polynomial regression with response surface analyses revealed that the agreement between leaders and their followers regarding safety leadership before training was positively related to training outcomes including safety leadership and followers’ safety self-efficacy. Line managers who overrated themselves on safety leadership before training had less favorable training outcomes. Our findings suggest that 360-degree feedback may not be sufficient for motivating leaders to change their behaviors during leadership training.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier B.V., 2019
Keywords
Leader-follower perceptual distance, Leadership training, Polynomial regression, Response surface analysis, Safety leadership, Safety self-efficacy, Paper and pulp industry, Surface analysis, Surface properties, Perceptual distance, Self efficacy, Personnel training, article, human, leadership, major clinical study, manager, outcome assessment, paper mill, self concept, surface property
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-44868 (URN)10.1016/j.ssci.2019.06.019 (DOI)00496335100004 ()2-s2.0-85067977783 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-07-11 Created: 2019-07-11 Last updated: 2019-12-02Bibliographically approved
Molnar, M. M., von Thiele Schwarz, U., Hellgren, J., Hasson, H. & Tafvelin, S. (2019). Leading for safety: A question of leadership focus. Safety and Health at Work, 10(2), 180-187
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Leading for safety: A question of leadership focus
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Safety and Health at Work, ISSN 2093-7911, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 180-187Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

There is considerable evidence that leadership influences workplace safety, but less is known about the relative importance of different leadership styles for safety. In addition, a leadership style characterized by an emphasis and a focus on promoting safety has rarely been investigated alongside other more general leadership styles.

Methods

Data was collected through a survey to which 269 employees in a paper mill company responded. A regression analysis was conducted to examine the relative roles of transformational, transactional (management-by-exception active; MBEA), and safety-specific leadership for different safety behavioral outcomes (compliance behavior and safety initiative behaviors) and for minor and major injuries.

Results

A safety-specific leadership contributed the most to the enhanced safety of the three different kinds of leadership. Transformational leadership did not contribute to any safety outcome over and above that of a safety-specific leadership, while a transactional leadership (MBEA) was associated with negative safety outcomes (fewer safety initiatives and increased minor injuries).

Conclusion

The most important thing for leaders aiming at improving workplace safety is to continuously emphasize safety, both in their communication and by acting as role models. This highlights the importance for leadership training programs aiming to improve safety to actually focus on safety promoting communication and behaviors rather than general leadership. Furthermore, an overly monitoring and controlling leadership style can be detrimental to attempts at achieving improved workplace safety.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
National Category
Social Sciences Other Social Sciences
Research subject
Working Life Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-41571 (URN)10.1016/j.shaw.2018.12.001 (DOI)000471959400007 ()2-s2.0-85060331416 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-12-14 Created: 2018-12-14 Last updated: 2019-12-12Bibliographically approved
Tafvelin, S., Nielsen, K., von Thiele Schwarz, U. & Stenling, A. (2019). Leading well is a matter of resources: Leader vigour and peer support augments the relationship between transformational leadership and burnout. Work & Stress, 33(2), 156-172
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Leading well is a matter of resources: Leader vigour and peer support augments the relationship between transformational leadership and burnout
2019 (English)In: Work & Stress, ISSN 0267-8373, E-ISSN 1464-5335, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 156-172Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Although studies suggest that transformational leaders play an important role in employee health and well-being, the relationship between transformational leadership and employee burnout remains unclear. One reason may be that moderators may play an important role. Building on conservation of resources theory, we examined if leaders’ perceptions of internal and external resources in terms of vigour and peer support augmented the relationship between transformational leadership and employee burnout in a sample of municipality workers and their leaders in Sweden (N = 217). Multilevel analyses over two time points revealed that both vigour and peer support enhance this relationship, such that when leaders experience high levels of vigour or peer support, the negative relationship between transformational leadership behaviours and employee burnout was strengthened. Our findings suggest that both personal and contextual resources may help leaders to better engage in transformational leadership, which is important in order to protect employees from burning out. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2019
Keywords
burnout, conservation of resources theory, peer support, Transformational leadership, vigour
National Category
Other Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-45642 (URN)10.1080/02678373.2018.1513961 (DOI)2-s2.0-85064602804 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-10-23 Created: 2019-10-23 Last updated: 2019-11-12
von Thiele Schwarz, U., Aarons, G. A. & Hasson, H. (2019). The Value Equation: Three complementary propositions for reconciling fidelity and adaptation in evidence-based practice implementation. BMC Health Services Research, 19(1)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Value Equation: Three complementary propositions for reconciling fidelity and adaptation in evidence-based practice implementation
2019 (English)In: BMC Health Services Research, ISSN 1472-6963, E-ISSN 1472-6963, Vol. 19, no 1Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: There has long been debate about the balance between fidelity to evidence-based interventions (EBIs) and the need for adaptation for specific contexts or particular patients. The debate is relevant to virtually all clinical areas. This paper synthesises arguments from both fidelity and adaptation perspectives to provide a comprehensive understanding of the challenges involved, and proposes a theoretical and practical approach for how fidelity and adaptation can optimally be managed. DISCUSSION: There are convincing arguments in support of both fidelity and adaptations, representing the perspectives of intervention developers and internal validity on the one hand and users and external validity on the other. Instead of characterizing fidelity and adaptation as mutually exclusive, we propose that they may better be conceptualized as complimentary, representing two synergistic perspectives that can increase the relevance of research, and provide a practical way to approach the goal of optimizing patient outcomes. The theoretical approach proposed, the "Value Equation," provides a method for reconciling the fidelity and adaptation debate by putting it in relation to the value (V) that is produced. The equation involves three terms: intervention (IN), context (C), and implementation strategies (IS). Fidelity and adaptation determine how these terms are balanced and, in turn, the end product - the value it produces for patients, providers, organizations, and systems. The Value Equation summarizes three central propositions: 1) The end product of implementation efforts should emphasize overall value rather than only the intervention effects, 2) implementation strategies can be construed as a method to create fit between EBIs and context, and 3) transparency is vital; not only for the intervention but for all of the four terms of the equation. There are merits to arguments for both fidelity and adaptation. We propose a theoretical approach, a Value Equation, to reconciling the fidelity and adaptation debate. Although there are complexities in the equation and the propositions, we suggest that the Value Equation be used in developing and testing hypotheses that can help implementation science move toward a more granular understanding of the roles of fidelity and adaptation in the implementation process, and ultimately sustainability of practices that provide value to stakeholders.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
NLM (Medline), 2019
Keywords
Adherence, Evaluation, Fidelity, Modifications, Sustainability theory, Sustainment, Theory, Validity, adult, article, evidence based practice center, external validity, human, implementation science, internal validity, organization, theoretical study
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-46213 (URN)10.1186/s12913-019-4668-y (DOI)000506192400016 ()2-s2.0-85075471685 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-12-02 Created: 2019-12-02 Last updated: 2020-01-23Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-4771-8349

Search in DiVA

Show all publications