mdh.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Publications (10 of 76) Show all publications
Wiklund, C. A., Kuja-Halkola, R., Thornton, L. M., Bälter, K., Welch, E. & Bulik, C. M. (2018). Childhood body mass index and development of eating disorder traits across adolescence. European eating disorders review, 26(5), 462-471
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Childhood body mass index and development of eating disorder traits across adolescence
Show others...
2018 (English)In: European eating disorders review, ISSN 1072-4133, E-ISSN 1099-0968, Vol. 26, no 5, p. 462-471Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: Understanding the role of premorbid body mass index (BMI) in the emergence of eating disorders may be key to identifying effective prevention strategies. We explore relations between BMI and eating disorders traits in young twins. Method: The effect of BMI at age 9/12 and 15 on eating disorder traits measured using the Eating Disorders Inventory-2 (EDI) at ages 15 and 18 was examined using bivariate modelling in a longitudinal population sample of Swedish twins. Results: The correlation between BMI and EDI within individuals was stable across all ages and remained significant after adjusting for later BMI. Bivariate analysis indicated significant positive genetic correlations between BMI ages 9/12 and 15 and subsequent EDI scores. The relationship remained significant for BMI age 9/12 and EDI age 15 in the adjusted model, indicating a longitudinal association. Conclusion: Our results have implications for conceptualizing the interrelation of BMI and eating disorders across childhood and adolescence. 

National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-40363 (URN)10.1002/erv.2612 (DOI)000440549500008 ()29927002 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85050972141 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-08-17 Created: 2018-08-17 Last updated: 2018-10-16Bibliographically approved
Sjors, C., Hedenus, F., Sjolander, A., Tillander, A. & Bälter, K. (2017). Adherence to dietary recommendations for Swedish adults across categories of greenhouse gas emissions from food. Public Health Nutrition, 20(18), 3381-3393
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adherence to dietary recommendations for Swedish adults across categories of greenhouse gas emissions from food
Show others...
2017 (English)In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 20, no 18, p. 3381-3393Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To explore associations between diet-related greenhouse gas emissions (GHGE), nutrient intakes and adherence to the Nordic Nutrition Recommendations among Swedish adults. Design: Diet was assessed by 4 d food records in the Swedish National Dietary Survey. GHGE was estimated by linking all foods to carbon dioxide equivalents, using data from life cycle assessment studies. Participants were categorized into quartiles of energy-adjusted GHGE and differences between GHGE groups regarding nutrient intakes and adherence to nutrient recommendations were explored. Setting: Sweden. Subjects: Women (n 840) and men (n 627) aged 18-80 years. Results: Differences in nutrient intakes and adherence to nutrient recommendations between GHGE groups were generally small. The dietary intake of participants with the lowest emissions was more in line with recommendations regarding protein, carbohydrates, dietary fibre and vitamin D, but further from recommendations regarding added sugar, compared with the highest GHGE group. The overall adherence to recommendations was found to be better among participants with lower emissions compared with higher emissions. Among women, 27% in the lowest GHGE group adhered to at least twenty-three recommendations compared with only 12% in the highest emission group. For men, the corresponding figures were 17 and 10 %, respectively. Conclusions: The study compared nutrient intakes as well as adherence to dietary recommendations for diets with different levels of GHGE from a national dietary survey. We found that participants with low-emission diets, despite higher intake of added sugar, adhered to a larger number of dietary recommendations than those with high emissions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
CAMBRIDGE UNIV PRESS, 2017
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-38585 (URN)10.1017/S1368980017002300 (DOI)000423197700020 ()28879831 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85030833631 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-02-08 Created: 2018-02-08 Last updated: 2018-11-28Bibliographically approved
Raposo, S. E., Fondell, E., Strom, P., Balter, O., Bonn, S. E., Nyren, O., . . . Bälter, K. (2017). Intake of vitamin C, vitamin E, selenium, zinc and polyunsaturated fatty acids and upper respiratory tract infection-a prospective cohort study. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 71(4), 450-457
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Intake of vitamin C, vitamin E, selenium, zinc and polyunsaturated fatty acids and upper respiratory tract infection-a prospective cohort study
Show others...
2017 (English)In: European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0954-3007, E-ISSN 1476-5640, Vol. 71, no 4, p. 450-457Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Antioxidants and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) have a role in the human immune defense and may affect the susceptibility to upper respiratory tract infection (URTI). To examine dietary intake of vitamin C, vitamin E, selenium, zinc and PUFAs in relation to URTI incidence in a prospective cohort study. SUBJECTS/METHODS: A total of 1533 Swedish women and men aged 25-64 years were followed for nine months during 2011-2012. Information on dietary intake was assessed through a web-based food frequency questionnaire, and events of URTI were self-reported prospectively as they occurred. Cox proportional hazards regression was applied to obtain incidence rate ratios with 95% confidence intervals. RESULTS: The mean number of URTI events was 0.9 among all participants, 1.0 among women and 0.7 among men. In women, the incidence rate ratios ( 95% confidence interval) for high compared with low intake were 0.69 (0.55-0.88) for vitamin C, 0.77 (0.62-0.96) for vitamin E, 0.57 (0.39-0.83) for docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and 0.80 (0.65-0.99) for arachidonic acid ( AA). No association was found for selenium or zinc among women. In men, an increased URTI incidence was seen with medium vitamin E intake (1.42 (1.09-1.85)) and high zinc intake (1.50 (1.04-2.16)). No association was found for vitamin C, selenium or PUFAs among men. CONCLUSIONS: We found an inverse association of URTI incidence among women for vitamin C, vitamin E, DHA and AA intake and a positive association among men for vitamin E and zinc intake. The observed gender differences warrant further investigation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP, 2017
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-40664 (URN)10.1038/ejcn.2016.261 (DOI)000398902800004 ()28074891 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-09-06 Created: 2018-09-06 Last updated: 2018-09-06Bibliographically approved
Nystrom, C. D., Henriksson, H., Alexandrou, C., Bergstrom, A., Bonn, S., Bälter, K. & Lof, M. (2017). Validation of an Online Food Frequency Questionnaire against Doubly LabelledWater and 24 h Dietary Recalls in Pre-School Children. Nutrients, 9(1), Article ID 66.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Validation of an Online Food Frequency Questionnaire against Doubly LabelledWater and 24 h Dietary Recalls in Pre-School Children
Show others...
2017 (English)In: Nutrients, ISSN 2072-6643, E-ISSN 2072-6643, Vol. 9, no 1, article id 66Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The development of easy-to-use and accurate methods to assess the intake of energy, foods and nutrients in pre-school children is needed. KidMeal-Q is an online food frequency questionnaire developed for the LifeGene prospective cohort study in Sweden. The aims of this study were to compare: (i) energy intake (EI) obtained using KidMeal-Q to total energy expenditure (TEE) measured via doubly labelled water and (ii) the intake of certain foods measured using KidMeal-Q to intakes acquired by means of 24 h dietary recalls in 38 children aged 5.5 years. The mean EI calculated using KidMeal-Q was statistically different (p < 0.001) from TEE (4670 +/- 1430 kJ/24 h and 6070 +/- 690 kJ/24 h, respectively). Significant correlations were observed for vegetables, fruit juice and candy between KidMeal-Q and 24 h dietary recalls. Only sweetened beverage consumption was significantly different in mean intake (p < 0.001), as measured by KidMeal-Q and 24 h dietary recalls. In conclusion, KidMeal-Q had a relatively short answering time and comparative validity to other food frequency questionnaires. However, its accuracy needs to be improved before it can be used in studies in pre-school children.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI AG, 2017
Keywords
doubly labelled water, food frequency questionnaire, 24 h dietary recalls, pre-school
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-40665 (URN)10.3390/nu9010066 (DOI)000396465500065 ()
Available from: 2018-09-06 Created: 2018-09-06 Last updated: 2018-09-06Bibliographically approved
Bonn, S. E., Sjolander, A., Tillander, A., Wiklund, F., Gronberg, H. & Bälter, K. (2016). Body mass index in relation to serum prostate-specific antigen levels and prostate cancer risk. International Journal of Cancer, 139(1), 50-57
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Body mass index in relation to serum prostate-specific antigen levels and prostate cancer risk
Show others...
2016 (English)In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 139, no 1, p. 50-57Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

High Body mass index (BMI) has been directly associated with risk of aggressive or fatal prostate cancer. One possible explanation may be an effect of BMI on serum levels of prostate-specific antigen (PSA). To study the association between BMI and serum PSA as well as prostate cancer risk, a large cohort of men without prostate cancer at baseline was followed prospectively for prostate cancer diagnoses until 2015. Serum PSA and BMI were assessed among 15,827 men at baseline in 2010-2012. During follow-up, 735 men were diagnosed with prostate cancer with 282 (38.4%) classified as high-grade cancers. Multivariable linear regression models and natural cubic linear regression splines were fitted for analyses of BMI and log-PSA. For risk analysis, Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) and natural cubic Cox regression splines producing standardized cancer-free probabilities were fitted. Results showed that baseline Serum PSA decreased by 1.6% (95% CI: -2.1 to -1.1) with every one unit increase in BMI. Statistically significant decreases of 3.7, 11.7 and 32.3% were seen for increasing BMI-categories of 25<30, 30<35 and 35 kg/m(2), respectively, compared to the reference (18.5<25 kg/m(2)). No statistically significant associations were seen between BMI and prostate cancer risk although results were indicative of a positive association to incidence rates of high-grade disease and an inverse association to incidence of low-grade disease. However, findings regarding risk are limited by the short follow-up time. In conclusion, BMI was inversely associated to PSA-levels. BMI should be taken into consideration when referring men to a prostate biopsy based on serum PSA-levels. What's new? High body mass index (BMI) has been associated with risk of aggressive or fatal prostate cancer. One possible explanation may be an effect on serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels. Here, the authors assessed the association between BMI and serum PSA level and prostate cancer risk in a large prospective cohort study. While no statistically significant associations were found between BMI and overall risk of prostate cancer, increasing BMI was associated with decreased serum PSA levels among men with no previous prostate cancer diagnosis. BMI should be taken into consideration when referring men to a prostate biopsy based on PSA-test results.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY-BLACKWELL, 2016
Keywords
body mass index, incidence, prostate cancer, prostate specific antigen
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-40667 (URN)10.1002/ijc.30052 (DOI)000374381400008 ()26914149 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-09-06 Created: 2018-09-06 Last updated: 2018-09-06Bibliographically approved
Moller, E., Wilson, K. M., Batista, J. L., Mucci, L. A., Bälter, K. & Giovannucci, E. (2016). Body size across the life course and prostate cancer in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. International Journal of Cancer, 138(4), 853-865
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Body size across the life course and prostate cancer in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study
Show others...
2016 (English)In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 138, no 4, p. 853-865Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Current evidence of an association between body size and prostate cancer is conflicting, possibly due to differential effects of body size across the lifespan and the heterogeneity of the disease. We therefore examined childhood and adult body size in relation to total incident prostate cancer and prognostic subtypes in a prospective cohort of 47,491 US men in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. We assessed adult height, body mass index (BMI) in early and middle-to-late adulthood, adult waist circumference, and body shape at age 10. With follow-up from 1986 to 2010, we estimated the relative risk (RR) of prostate cancer using Cox proportional hazards models. We identified 6,183 incident cases. Tallness was associated with increased risk of advanced-stage tumors, particularly fatal disease (RR=1.66, 95% CI 1.23-2.23, highest vs. lowest quintile, p(trend) < 0.001). High BMI at age 21 was inversely associated with total prostate cancer (RR=0.89, 95% CI 0.80-0.98, BMI >= 26 vs. 20-21.9, p(trend)=0.01) and with fatal and advanced disease. The association for late adult BMI differed by age (p(interaction) < 0.001); high BMI was inversely associated with total prostate cancer (RR=0.64, 95% CI 0.51-0.78, BMI >= 30 vs. 21-22.9, p(trend) < 0.001) and with non-advanced and less aggressive tumors among men <= 65 years, whereas no association was seen among men >65 years. Adult waist circumference was weakly inversely associated with less aggressive disease. Childhood obesity was unclearly related to risk. Our study confirms tall men to be at increased risk of fatal and advanced prostate cancer. The influence of adiposity varies by prognostic disease subtype and by age. The relationship between body size and prostate cancer is complex. Body size changes progressively throughout life and consequent effects on prostate cancer risk may be associated with related changes in hormonal and metabolic pathways. This large prospective study examined potential associations between the risk of various prostate cancer subtypes and multiple anthropometric measures at different ages in men. Tallness was confirmed to be associated with an elevated risk of advanced prostate cancer, particularly fatal disease. The extent to which body weight influenced risk varied according to factors such as age and disease subtype.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY-BLACKWELL, 2016
Keywords
prostatic neoplasms, height, body mass index, childhood body size, waist circumference, epidemiology
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-40668 (URN)10.1002/ijc.29842 (DOI)000369164200007 ()26355806 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-09-06 Created: 2018-09-06 Last updated: 2018-09-06Bibliographically approved
Sjors, C., Raposo, S. E., Sjolander, A., Balter, O., Hedenus, F. & Bälter, K. (2016). Diet-related greenhouse gas emissions assessed by a food frequency questionnaire and validated using 7-day weighed food records. Environmental health, 15, Article ID 15.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Diet-related greenhouse gas emissions assessed by a food frequency questionnaire and validated using 7-day weighed food records
Show others...
2016 (English)In: Environmental health, ISSN 1476-069X, E-ISSN 1476-069X, Vol. 15, article id 15Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The current food system generates about 25 % of total greenhouse gas emissions (GHGE), including deforestation, and thereby substantially contributes to the warming of the earth's surface. To understand the association between food and nutrient intake and GHGE, we therefore need valid methods to assess diet-related GHGE in observational studies. Methods: Life cycle assessment (LCA) studies assess the environmental impact of different food items. We linked LCA data expressed as kg carbon dioxide equivalents (CO(2)e) per kg food product to data on food intake assessed by the food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) Meal-Q and validated it against a 7-day weighed food record (WFR). 166 male and female volunteers aged 20-63 years completed Meal-Q and the WFR, and their food intake was linked to LCA data. Results: The mean GHGE assessed with Meal-Q was 3.76 kg CO(2)e per day and person, whereas it was 5.04 kg CO(2)e using the WFR. The energy-adjusted and deattenuated Pearson and Spearman correlation coefficients were 0.68 and 0.70, respectively. Moreover, compared to the WFR, Meal-Q provided a good ranking ability, with 90 % of the participants classified into the same or adjacent quartile according to their daily average CO(2)e. The Bland-Altman plot showed an acceptable level of agreement between the two methods and the reproducibility of Meal-Q was high. Conclusions: This is the first study validating the assessment of diet-related GHGE by a questionnaire. The results suggest that Meal-Q is a useful tool for studying the link between food habits and CO(2)e in future epidemiological studies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BIOMED CENTRAL LTD, 2016
Keywords
Validation studies, Reproducibility of results, Food frequency questionnaire, Weighed food record, Epidemiology, Greenhouse gas emission, Climate change, Life cycle assessment, Carbon dioxide equivalents, Sustainable diets
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-40669 (URN)10.1186/s12940-016-0110-7 (DOI)000369630000001 ()26860262 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-09-06 Created: 2018-09-06 Last updated: 2018-09-06Bibliographically approved
Jan, M., Bonn, S. E., Sjolander, A., Wiklund, F., Stattin, P., Holmberg, E., . . . Bälter, K. (2016). The roles of stress and social support in prostate cancer mortality. Scandinavian journal of urology, 50(1), 47-55
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The roles of stress and social support in prostate cancer mortality
Show others...
2016 (English)In: Scandinavian journal of urology, ISSN 2168-1805, E-ISSN 2168-1813, Vol. 50, no 1, p. 47-55Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: This study aimed to evaluate the association between perceived stress, social support, disease progression and mortality in a nationwide population-based cohort of men with prostate cancer. Materials and methods: The study surveyed 4105 Swedish men treated for clinically localized prostate cancer regarding stress, grief, sleep habits and social support. Associations between these factors and mortality were assessed using multivariate Cox regression analysis. Results: Men with the highest levels of perceived stress had a statistically significantly increased rate of prostate cancer-specific mortality compared with men with low stress levels (hazard ratio 1.66, 95% confidence interval 1.05-2.63). Men with high stress levels also had a high frequency of grieving and sleep loss. They also had fewer people with whom to share their emotional problems and felt an inability to share most of their problems with partners, friends and family. Conclusions: This study contributes to the growing field of psychosocial quality of life research in men with prostate cancer. The findings show a significant association between prostate cancer-specific mortality and perceived stress in patients initially diagnosed with localized, non-metastatic prostate cancer. Significant associations between perceived stress and various psychosocial factors were also seen. The findings of this study could prove useful to target interventions to improve quality of life in men with prostate cancer.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD, 2016
Keywords
Oncology, perceived stress, prostate cancer, quality of life, social support
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-40670 (URN)10.3109/21681805.2015.1079796 (DOI)000367832000009 ()26343525 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-09-06 Created: 2018-09-06 Last updated: 2018-09-06Bibliographically approved
Russnes, K. M., Moller, E., Wilson, K. M., Carlsen, M., Blomhoff, R., Smeland, S., . . . Bälter, K. (2016). Total antioxidant intake and prostate cancer in the Cancer of the Prostate in Sweden (CAPS) study. A case control study. BMC Cancer, 16, Article ID 438.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Total antioxidant intake and prostate cancer in the Cancer of the Prostate in Sweden (CAPS) study. A case control study
Show others...
2016 (English)In: BMC Cancer, ISSN 1471-2407, E-ISSN 1471-2407, Vol. 16, article id 438Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The total intake of dietary antioxidants may reduce prostate cancer risk but available data are sparse and the possible role of supplements unclear. We investigated the potential association between total and dietary antioxidant intake and prostate cancer in a Swedish population. Methods: We used FFQ data from 1499 cases and 1112 controls in the population based case-control study Cancer of the Prostate in Sweden (CAPS). The ferric reducing antioxidant potential (FRAP) assay was used to assess the total antioxidant capacity (TAC) of diet and supplements. We calculated odds ratios (ORs) for the risk of prostate cancer across quintiles of antioxidant intake from all foods, from fruit and vegetables only, and from dietary supplements using unconditional logistic regression. Results: Coffee comprised 62 % of the dietary antioxidant intake, tea 4 %, berries 4 %, chocolate 2 %, and boiled potatoes 2 %. In total 19 % and 13 % of the population took multivitamins and supplemental Vitamin C respectively, on a regular basis. Antioxidant intake from all foods and from fruits and vegetables separately measured by the FRAP assay was not associated with prostate cancer risk. For antioxidant intake from supplements we found a positive association with total, advanced, localized, high grade and low grade prostate cancer in those above median supplemental TAC intake of users compared to non-users (Adjusted ORs for total prostate cancer: 1. 37, 95 % CI 1.08-1.73, advanced: 1.51, 95 % CI 1.11-2.06, localized: 1.36. 95 % CI 1.06-1.76, high grade 1.60, 95 % CI 1.06-2.40, low grade 1.36, 95 % CI 1.03-1.81). A high intake of coffee (>= 6 cups/day) was associated with a possible risk reduction of fatal and significantly with reduced risk for high grade prostate cancer, adjusted OR: 0.45 (95 % CI: 0.22-0.90), whereas a high intake of chocolate was positively associated with risk of total, advanced, localized and low grade disease (adjusted OR for total: 1.43, 95 % CI 1.12-1.82, advanced: 1.40, 95 % CI 1.01-1.96, localized: 1.43, 95 % CI 1.08-1.88, low-grade: 1.41, 95 % CI 1.03-1.93). Conclusions: Total antioxidant intake from diet was not associated with prostate cancer risk. Supplement use may be associated with greater risk of disease.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BIOMED CENTRAL LTD, 2016
Keywords
Antioxidants, Prostate cancer, Coffee, Dietary supplement
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-40666 (URN)10.1186/s12885-016-2486-8 (DOI)000380013300001 ()27400803 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-09-06 Created: 2018-09-06 Last updated: 2018-09-06Bibliographically approved
Henriksson, H., Bonn, S. E., Bergstrom, A., Bälter, K., Balter, O., Delisle, C., . . . Lof, M. (2015). A New Mobile Phone-Based Tool for Assessing Energy and Certain Food Intakes in Young Children: A Validation Study. JMIR mhealth and uhealth, 3(2), Article ID e38.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A New Mobile Phone-Based Tool for Assessing Energy and Certain Food Intakes in Young Children: A Validation Study
Show others...
2015 (English)In: JMIR mhealth and uhealth, E-ISSN 2291-5222, Vol. 3, no 2, article id e38Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Childhood obesity is an increasing health problem globally. Obesity may be established already at pre-school age. Further research in this area requires accurate and easy-to-use methods for assessing the intake of energy and foods. Traditional methods have limited accuracy, and place large demands on the study participants and researchers. Mobile phones offer possibilities for methodological advancements in this area since they are readily available, enable instant digitalization of collected data, and also contain a camera to photograph pre- and post-meal food items. We have recently developed a new tool for assessing energy and food intake in children using mobile phones called the Tool for Energy Balance in Children (TECH). Objective: The main aims of our study are to (1) compare energy intake by means of TECH with total energy expenditure (TEE) measured using a criterion method, the doubly labeled water (DLW) method, and (2) to compare intakes of fruits and berries, vegetables, juice, and sweetened beverages assessed by means of TECH with intakes obtained using a Web-based food frequency questionnaire (KidMeal-Q) in 3 year olds. Methods: In this study, 30 Swedish 3 year olds were included. Energy intake using TECH was compared to TEE measured using the DLW method. Intakes of vegetables, fruits and berries, juice, as well as sweetened beverages were assessed using TECH and compared to the corresponding intakes assessed using KidMeal-Q. Wilcoxon matched pairs test, Spearman rank order correlations, and the Bland-Altman procedure were applied. Results: The mean energy intake, assessed by TECH, was 5400 kJ/24h (SD 1500). This value was not significantly different (P=.23) from TEE (5070 kJ/24h, SD 600). However, the limits of agreement (2 standard deviations) in the Bland-Altman plot for energy intake estimated using TECH compared to TEE were wide (2990 kJ/24h), and TECH overestimated high and underestimated low energy intakes. The Bland-Altman plots for foods showed similar patterns. The mean intakes of vegetables, fruits and berries, juice, and sweetened beverages estimated using TECH were not significantly different from the corresponding intakes estimated using KidMeal-Q. Moderate but statistically significant correlations (rho=.42-.46, P=.01-.02) between TECH and KidMeal-Q were observed for intakes of vegetables, fruits and berries, and juice, but not for sweetened beverages. Conclusion: We found that one day of recordings using TECH was not able to accurately estimate intakes of energy or certain foods in 3 year old children.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
JMIR PUBLICATIONS, INC, 2015
Keywords
cell phone, digital camera, food intake, energy intake, child, DLW, FFQ
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-40675 (URN)10.2196/mhealth.3670 (DOI)000359791800004 ()25910494 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-09-06 Created: 2018-09-06 Last updated: 2018-09-06Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-2046-5641

Search in DiVA

Show all publications