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Sert, Olcay, PhD
Publications (10 of 23) Show all publications
Sert, O. (2019). Classroom Interaction and Language Teacher Education. In: Steve Walsh; Steve Mann (Ed.), The Routledge Handbook of English Language Teacher Education : (pp. 216-238). Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Classroom Interaction and Language Teacher Education
2019 (English)In: The Routledge Handbook of English Language Teacher Education / [ed] Steve Walsh; Steve Mann, Routledge, 2019, p. 216-238Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2019
Keywords
teacher education; language teaching; classroom interaction; conversation analysis
National Category
Pedagogy Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-45118 (URN)9781138961371 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-08-29 Created: 2019-08-29 Last updated: 2019-08-30Bibliographically approved
Somuncu, D. & Sert, O. (2019). EFL Trainee Teachers’ Orientations to Students’ Non-understanding: A Focus on Task Instructions. In: H. T. Nguyen; T. Malabarba (Ed.), Conversation Analytic Perspectives on English Language Learning, Teaching, and Testing in Global Contexts: . Bristol: Multilingual Matters
Open this publication in new window or tab >>EFL Trainee Teachers’ Orientations to Students’ Non-understanding: A Focus on Task Instructions
2019 (English)In: Conversation Analytic Perspectives on English Language Learning, Teaching, and Testing in Global Contexts / [ed] H. T. Nguyen; T. Malabarba, Bristol: Multilingual Matters, 2019Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Using Conversation Analysis, this paper explores EFL trainee teachers’ orientations to students’ displays of non-understanding in instruction giving sequences. The analyses draw on sequential organisation of talk as well as on various multi-semiotic resources the participants deploy including orientations to classroom artefacts (e.g. interactive whiteboards). The research utilises transcriptions of 13 (classroom) hours of video recordings of 13 different EFL teachers’ classes. The data were collected over a semester in 2013 in a public secondary school in Turkey. The findings show that students’ displays of non-understanding (e.g. through statements like “we did not understand” or by initiating requests for clarification) in instruction giving sequences are important sites for teachers to ensure clarity, as understanding of these instructions by the students are crucial for task accomplishment. Based on a collection of cases, we demonstrate that teachers may turn displays of non-understanding to understanding by using resources like multimodal explanations and modelling.  However, the majority of cases in instruction giving sequences include teachers’ lack of or limited orientations to students’ non-understanding. We argue that management of non-understanding in such sequences should be integrated into teacher education curricula in both content and language classrooms, as they play an important role in ensuring task accomplishment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Bristol: Multilingual Matters, 2019
Keywords
classroom interaction; EFL; language teaching; instructions
National Category
Didactics
Research subject
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-40961 (URN)9781788922890 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-09-19 Created: 2018-09-19 Last updated: 2019-10-01Bibliographically approved
Walsh, S. & Sert, O. (2019). Mediating L2 Learning Through Classroom Interaction. In: Xuesong Gao (Ed.), Second Handbook of English Language Teaching: . Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mediating L2 Learning Through Classroom Interaction
2019 (English)In: Second Handbook of English Language Teaching / [ed] Xuesong Gao, Springer, 2019Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This chapter focuses on the interactional dynamics of L2 English classrooms with an emphasis on how teachers mediate opportunities for learning. In L2 English classrooms, including English as a foreign language, English as a medium of instruction, and content and language-integrated learning settings, teachers require particular skills which allow them to make structures of L2 accessible through their interactional decisions. These teachers, we suggest, need an appropriate level of interactional competence to create opportunities and space where learning can occur. In this chapter, using data from a range of contexts, we present transcripts of video-recorded classes and demonstrate the ways in which learning is mediated, space created, and opportunities for learning established through a focus on Classroom Interactional Competence (CIC). We illustrate a variety of interactional practices that evidence CIC, including increased wait time, reduced teacher echo, and various feedback practices including the shaping of learner contributions. We also highlight the multimodal and multilingual aspects of CIC and discuss implications for L2 teacher education.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019
Keywords
Classroom interactional competence; L2 interaction; teaching; language; English
National Category
Didactics Pedagogy
Research subject
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-45119 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-58542-0_35-1 (DOI)978-3-319-58542-0 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-08-29 Created: 2019-08-29 Last updated: 2019-09-05Bibliographically approved
Duran, D. & Sert, O. (2019). Preference organization in English as a Medium of Instruction classrooms in a Turkish higher education setting. Linguistics and Education, 49, 72-85
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Preference organization in English as a Medium of Instruction classrooms in a Turkish higher education setting
2019 (English)In: Linguistics and Education, ISSN 0898-5898, E-ISSN 1873-1864, Vol. 49, p. 72-85Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Previous conversation analytic research has documented various aspects of preference organization and the ways dispreference is displayed in relation to pedagogical focus in L2 and CLIL classrooms (Seedhouse, 1997; Hellermann, 2009; Kääntä, 2010). This study explores preference organization in an under-researched context, an English as a Medium of Instruction (EMI) setting, and it specifically focuses on how a teacher displays dispreference for preceding learner turns. The data consist of 30 h of video recordings from two EMI classes, which were recorded for an academic term at a university in Turkey. Using Conversation Analysis, we demonstrate that the teacher employs a variety of interactional resources such as changing body position, gaze movements, hedging, and delaying devices to show dispreference for preceding student answers. Based on our empirical analysis, the ways the teacher prioritizes content and task over form/language are illustrated. The analyses also reveal that negotiation of meaning at content level and production of complex L2 structures can simultaneously be enabled through teachers’ specific turn designs in EMI classroom interaction. This demonstrates that preference organization, particularly in a teacher's responsive turns, can act as a catalyst for complex L2 production and enhance student participation. This study has implications for conversation analytic research on instructed learning settings, and in particular on teachers’ turn design in classroom interaction. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier Ltd, 2019
Keywords
Classroom interaction, Conversation analysis, English as a medium of instruction, Higher education, Preference organization
National Category
Pedagogy Didactics Learning Specific Languages
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-42699 (URN)10.1016/j.linged.2018.12.006 (DOI)000461483700008 ()2-s2.0-85061053438 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-02-15 Created: 2019-02-15 Last updated: 2019-08-30Bibliographically approved
Sert, O. (2019). The Interplay between Collaborative Turn Sequences and Active Listenership: Implications for the Development of L2 Interactional Competence. In: Rafael Salaberry; Silvia Kunitz (Ed.), Teaching and testing L2 interactional competence: bridging theory and practice: (pp. 110-131). Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Interplay between Collaborative Turn Sequences and Active Listenership: Implications for the Development of L2 Interactional Competence
2019 (English)In: Teaching and testing L2 interactional competence: bridging theory and practice / [ed] Rafael Salaberry; Silvia Kunitz, Routledge, 2019, p. 110-131Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This chapter shows that preliminary findings based on analyses of second language (L2) discussion task interactions involving learners who had previously had limited opportunities to practice oral communication. It focuses on participants’ deployment of responsive actions, and specifically focuses on turn completions in collaborative turn sequences. The chapter explains completions as ‘demonstrations of active listenership’ and argues that an interplay between collaborative turn sequences and demonstration of active listenership in relation to L2 interactional competence (IC). It provides a conversation analytic approach to data, followed by a post-analytic corpus linguistic annotation to present frequencies and a plot analysis using corpus software. Social interaction is a co-constructed accomplishment. The chapter presents a review of listenership, collaborative completions and L2 IC. It also presents a sequential analysis of representative extracts from the collection. The chapter outlines the quantitative findings from post-analytic observations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2019
Keywords
language learning; interactional competence; English; SLA; Conversation Analysis
National Category
Learning Didactics General Language Studies and Linguistics
Research subject
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-45117 (URN)9781138038998 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-08-29 Created: 2019-08-29 Last updated: 2019-08-30Bibliographically approved
Deniz, E. U., Sahne, B. S., Sert, O. & Yegenoglu, S. (2018). A STUDY ON POST EXPANSIONS IN PHARMACIST-INITIATED SEQUENCES IN PHARMACY INTERACTION: CONVERSATION ANALYSIS. Research in Social and Administrative Pharmacy, 14(8), E42-E42
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A STUDY ON POST EXPANSIONS IN PHARMACIST-INITIATED SEQUENCES IN PHARMACY INTERACTION: CONVERSATION ANALYSIS
2018 (English)In: Research in Social and Administrative Pharmacy, ISSN 1551-7411, E-ISSN 1934-8150, Vol. 14, no 8, p. E42-E42Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER SCIENCE INC, 2018
National Category
Other Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-40377 (URN)000439415000064 ()
Available from: 2018-08-17 Created: 2018-08-17 Last updated: 2018-08-17Bibliographically approved
Sert, O., Kunitz, S. & Markee, N. (2018). Editorial. Classroom Discourse, 9(1), 1-2
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Editorial
2018 (English)In: Classroom Discourse, ISSN 1946-3014, E-ISSN 1946-3022, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 1-2Article in journal, Editorial material (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2018
National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-38869 (URN)10.1080/19463014.2018.1437953 (DOI)000431528300001 ()2-s2.0-85043595453 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-03-22 Created: 2018-03-22 Last updated: 2019-01-16Bibliographically approved
Sert, O., Kunitz, S. & Markee, N. (2018). Editorial. Classroom Discourse, 9(3), 183-184
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Editorial
2018 (English)In: Classroom Discourse, ISSN 1946-3014, E-ISSN 1946-3022, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 183-184Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ROUTLEDGE JOURNALS, TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD, 2018
National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-46359 (URN)10.1080/19463014.2018.1521076 (DOI)000446721200001 ()
Available from: 2019-12-13 Created: 2019-12-13 Last updated: 2019-12-13Bibliographically approved
Sert, O. & Balaman, U. (2018). Orientations to Negotiated Language and Task Rules in Online L2 Interaction. ReCALL, 30(3), 355-374
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Orientations to Negotiated Language and Task Rules in Online L2 Interaction
2018 (English)In: ReCALL, ISSN 0958-3440, E-ISSN 1474-0109, Vol. 30, no 3, p. 355-374Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Recent research shows that negotiation of meaning in online task-oriented interactions can be a catalyst for L2 (second/foreign/additional language) development. However, how learners undertake such negotiation work and what kind of an impact it has on interactional development in an L2 are still largely unknown mainly due to a lack of focus on task engagement processes. A conversation analytic investigation into negotiation of meaning (NoM) in task-oriented interactions can bring evidence to such development, as conversation analysis (CA), given its analytic tools, allows us to see how participant orientations in interaction evolve over time. Based on an examination of screen-recorded multiparty online task-oriented interactions, this study aimed to describe how users (n=8) of an L2 (1) negotiate and co-construct language and task rules and (2) later show orientations to these rules both in the short term (50 minutes) and in the long term (8 weeks). The findings showed that in addition to negotiating existing rules, the learners co-constructed new rules around an action called policing, which occurred when the learners attended to the breach of language and task rules. Furthermore, even after the negotiation work was completed, they oriented to negotiated rules through policing their own utterances (i.e. self-policing). Overall, this interactional continuum (from other-repairs to self-repairs) brought longitudinal evidence to bear on the role of NoM in the development of L2 interactional competence. These findings bring new insights into NoM, technology-mediated task-based language teaching (TBLT), and CA for second language acquisition (SLA).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge University Press, 2018
Keywords
negotiation of meaning, task-based, online interaction, conversation analysis
National Category
General Language Studies and Linguistics Learning Didactics
Research subject
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-40819 (URN)10.1017/S0958344017000325 (DOI)000441138000007 ()2-s2.0-85041631679 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-09-10 Created: 2018-09-10 Last updated: 2019-10-01Bibliographically approved
Celik, S., Baran, E. & Sert, O. (2018). The Affordances of Mobile-App Supported Teacher Observations for Peer Feedback. International Journal of Mobile and Blended Learning, 10(2), 36-49
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Affordances of Mobile-App Supported Teacher Observations for Peer Feedback
2018 (English)In: International Journal of Mobile and Blended Learning, ISSN 1941-8647, E-ISSN 1941-8655, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 36-49Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Mobile technologies offer new affordances for teacher observation in teacher education programs, albeit under-examined in contrast to video technologies. The purpose of this article is to investigate the integration of mobile technologies into teacher observation. Using a case study method, the authors compare the traditional narrative paper-pen, mobile app-supported, and video observation methods. Participants included 2 experienced teachers of English as a Foreign Language who were selected as the observers and observees in a higher education institutional context. The data was collected in three different teaching sessions over 4 weeks. Data sources included lesson observation notes and semi structured interviews conducted with teachers after each session. Results suggest recommendations for the integration of mobile and video based observation tools into teacher professional development programs, pre-service and in-service teacher education programs, as well as teacher certificate programs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IGI Global, 2018
National Category
Educational Sciences Didactics Pedagogy Interaction Technologies
Research subject
Didactics; Innovation and Design
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-38867 (URN)10.4018/IJMBL.2018040104 (DOI)000455507000005 ()2-s2.0-85044078369 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-03-21 Created: 2018-03-21 Last updated: 2019-01-31Bibliographically approved
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