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Benozzo, A., Carey, N., Cozza, M., Elmenhorst, C., Fairchild, N., Koro-Ljungberg, M. & Taylor, C. (2019). Disturbing the Academic Conference Machine: Post-Qualitative Re-turnings. Gender, Work and Organization, 6(2), 87-106
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Disturbing the Academic Conference Machine: Post-Qualitative Re-turnings
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2019 (English)In: Gender, Work and Organization, ISSN 0968-6673, E-ISSN 1468-0432, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 87-106Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Keywords
Academic Conference Machine, academic writing machine, cyborg, earthworm, post‐qualitative research
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-39930 (URN)10.1111/gwao.12260 (DOI)000458572400001 ()2-s2.0-85059055499 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-06-19 Created: 2018-06-19 Last updated: 2019-04-10Bibliographically approved
Cozza, M., Crevani, L., Hallin, A. & Schaeffer, J. (2019). Future ageing: welfare technology practices for our future older selves. Futures: The journal of policy, planning and futures studies, 109, 117-129
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Future ageing: welfare technology practices for our future older selves
2019 (English)In: Futures: The journal of policy, planning and futures studies, ISSN 0016-3287, E-ISSN 1873-6378, Vol. 109, p. 117-129Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this paper, we elaborate on how the future older person is characterised and what future ageing entails in relation to welfare technologies highlighting which actors, social and material, affect innovation governance and discussing who does not. Starting from a distinction between public, private, and academic perspectives we discuss how companies, public sector organisa- tions, and research-oriented actors construct future ageing through sociomaterial practices in the welfare technology arena. We base our reasoning on an ethnographic study conducted during the 2017 edition of the yearly MVTe-Mötesplats Välfärdsteknologi och E-hälsa Swedish event (in English: Meeting place for Welfare Technology and e-Health). We use the concept ‘welfare technology practices’ to describe how actors perform future ageing by producing and reprodu- cing a scenario where the positive effects of technology are assumed and the plurality of future older selves is overlooked. We problematise this view by reflecting on ageing as a complex so- ciomaterial process that calls for welfare technology practices and policies open to a pluralistic view of the future as futures. This study may inspire research that further explore how future ageing is constructed as well as support the development of welfare technology practices for addressing current blind spots.

Keywords
Ageing Futures Sociomateriality Welfare technology Welfare technology practices
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Industrial Economics and Organisations; Innovation and Design
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-39928 (URN)10.1016/j.futures.2018.03.011 (DOI)000470949300011 ()2-s2.0-85063729097 (Scopus ID)
Projects
SiNSHV3D/O
Funder
Vinnova
Available from: 2018-06-19 Created: 2018-06-19 Last updated: 2019-06-27Bibliographically approved
Crevani, L. & Cozza, M. (2018). COMPLEMENTARY REPRESENTATIONAL PRACTICES FOR ARTICULATING MATTERS OF CONCERN. In: PIN-C: the 5 th Participatory Innovation Conference: . Paper presented at PIN-C: the 5 th Participatory Innovation Conference.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>COMPLEMENTARY REPRESENTATIONAL PRACTICES FOR ARTICULATING MATTERS OF CONCERN
2018 (English)In: PIN-C: the 5 th Participatory Innovation Conference, 2018Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Matters of concern can be defined as complicated, engaging, diverse, fragile, and situated issue for which we care. Researchers can contribute to articulating them. In this paper, we discuss one methodological aspect that influences the articulation of matters of concern by applying a participatory design approach. By referring to workshops organized for studying the introduction of welfare technology for older people, we argue that combining different representational practices both enables and constrains the participants’ agency. Enabling and constraining depends on the performativity of the sociomateriality of the practice of method and the analysis of such aspects lead to the articulation of matters of concern.

Keywords
matter of concern, representation, representational practice
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Industrial Economics and Organisations
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-37435 (URN)
Conference
PIN-C: the 5 th Participatory Innovation Conference
Projects
SInSHV3D
Funder
VINNOVA, 2016-03170
Available from: 2017-12-10 Created: 2017-12-10 Last updated: 2018-05-28Bibliographically approved
Cozza, M. (2018). Engagement by infrastructuring. In: : . Paper presented at 24th Nordic Congress of Gerontology.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Engagement by infrastructuring
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Industrial Economics and Organisations
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-37401 (URN)
Conference
24th Nordic Congress of Gerontology
Projects
HV3D/O-SInS
Available from: 2017-12-06 Created: 2017-12-06 Last updated: 2018-05-28Bibliographically approved
Andersson, C., Cozza, M., Crevani, L. & Schunnesson, J. (2018). Infrastructuring for remote night monitoring: Frictions in striving for transparency when digitalising care service. In: Proceedings of the 16th European Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work: Exploratory Papers, Reports of the European Society for Socially Embedded Technologies. Paper presented at ECSCW 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Infrastructuring for remote night monitoring: Frictions in striving for transparency when digitalising care service
2018 (English)In: Proceedings of the 16th European Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work: Exploratory Papers, Reports of the European Society for Socially Embedded Technologies, 2018Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The question of how to organise for the introduction of a new service involving the interaction of humans and technologies is both crucial and challenging. Convergence between the community of practice using the technology and the design of the technology is crucial for the technology to become meaningful and usable. While processes of convergence are challenging in themselves, they become more complex if several communities of practice are going to use and collaborate around/through the technology. The co-presence of different communities of practice is a common situation when delivering public welfare services. In particular, the development of welfare technology is a context rich in potential frictions, making convergence challenging. By mobilising the concept of transparency, we analyse the process of implementation of remote night monitoring and highlight how transparency is related to different aspects. Such analysis reveals that processes of convergence are related in this context not only to frictions shared with other settings, but also to specific frictions related to matters of concern in welfare services. This leads us to discuss whether digitalised care services can be argued as still having a human side or not.

Keywords
infrastructuring, transparency, home-care, welfare technology
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Industrial Economics and Organisations
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-39044 (URN)
Conference
ECSCW 2018
Projects
SInSHV3DDigMa
Funder
VINNOVA, 2016-03170
Available from: 2018-04-19 Created: 2018-04-19 Last updated: 2018-05-28
Cozza, M. (2018). Interoperability and convergence for welfare technology. In: Lecture Notes in Computer Science, Volume 10927 LNCS: . Paper presented at 4th International Conference on Human Aspects of IT for the Aged Population, ITAP 2018 Held as Part of HCI International 2018; Las Vegas; United States; 15 July 2018 through 20 July 2018 (pp. 13-24). Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Interoperability and convergence for welfare technology
2018 (English)In: Lecture Notes in Computer Science, Volume 10927 LNCS, Springer, 2018, , p. 13-24p. 13-24Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Interoperability and convergence are two key features of any working sociotechnical infrastructure that includes a plurality and multiplicity of communities of practice using technologies. However, as information systems scale up and the heterogeneity of users increases, it becomes challenging to actualise interoperability and convergence. When it comes to welfare services, the development of interoperable information systems and converging communities of practice is key to the quality and efficiency of services, both for practitioners and users. This paper elaborates on these concepts and their practical relevance by presenting and discussing data from a research project on ageing and welfare technology in Sweden. A participatory approach is meant to act as methodological support for the actualisation of interoperability and convergence even though socio-organisational and political constraints cannot be fully overcome once for all.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2018. p. 13-24
Series
LNCS, ISSN 0302-9743, E-ISSN 1611-3349 ; 10927
Keywords
Communities of practice, Cooperation, Infrastructuring
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-40280 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-92037-5_2 (DOI)2-s2.0-85050602640 (Scopus ID)9783319920368 (ISBN)
Conference
4th International Conference on Human Aspects of IT for the Aged Population, ITAP 2018 Held as Part of HCI International 2018; Las Vegas; United States; 15 July 2018 through 20 July 2018
Projects
SInS: Att utveckla förmågan att driva social innovation genom teknik i samverkan / Developing the capacity of leading technology-related social innovation in cooperation
Funder
VINNOVA
Available from: 2018-07-21 Created: 2018-07-21 Last updated: 2018-08-16Bibliographically approved
Cozza, M. & Crevani, L. (2018). Matters of concern in welfare technology. In: : . Paper presented at EASST, 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Matters of concern in welfare technology
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-43032 (URN)
Conference
EASST, 2018
Available from: 2019-04-06 Created: 2019-04-06 Last updated: 2019-06-04Bibliographically approved
Cozza, M., Gherardi, S. & Poggio, B. (2018). Narratives as boundary objects. In: : . Paper presented at European Congress of Qualitative Inquire.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Narratives as boundary objects
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-37399 (URN)
Conference
European Congress of Qualitative Inquire
Available from: 2017-12-06 Created: 2017-12-06 Last updated: 2018-05-28Bibliographically approved
Pagliarusco, C. & Cozza, M. (2018). Radicant writing. In: : . Paper presented at GWO-10th Biennial International Interdisciplinary Conference.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Radicant writing
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-37402 (URN)
Conference
GWO-10th Biennial International Interdisciplinary Conference
Available from: 2017-12-06 Created: 2017-12-06 Last updated: 2018-05-28Bibliographically approved
Carey, N., Koro-Ljungberg, M., Benozzo, A., Taylor, C., Cozza, M., Fairchild, N. & Elmenhorst, C. (2017). Autopsy goes rogue: a theatrical experiment on method. In: : . Paper presented at After method in organization studies III.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Autopsy goes rogue: a theatrical experiment on method
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2017 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

A (mis)organized stream at a recent academic conference adopted a post-qualitative (in)sensibility in experimenting with how intentionally non-normative practices (more properly practicings) and a play with material objects might disrupt the smoothness of the academicconferencemachine.  One such experiment witnessed the re-assembly of fragmented male doll parts, previously distributed throughout the conference space, onto an ‘autopsy table’.  The autopsy table became a creative participatory theatre for/of doll parts that adopted a range of vital poses and shapes through/out the life of the conference – despite the absence of direction or instruction.  In this instance, the autopsy table featured more like its use in forensic anthropology than that in medical pathology.  This autopsy table was a site of epistemological re-assembly, of putting together thoughts, senses, and practices rather than –as well as by – cutting apart.

In the proposed session, we re-turn the autopsy table and eschew the idea of ‘the paper’ in the first instance.  Instead, the presentation/performance/experiment/workshop explores the groping, creative assemblages and unpredictable onto-epistemological productivities available through the autopsy table – as a site of assembly and as metaphor – in thinking differently about what social science methods do, claim to do, and might want to do.  Participants – invited to the table to co-produce – will be asked to do so without the benefit of omniscient methodological directionality or ‘full sight’: positioned behind operating screens, and working with a range of materials out of sight.  Participants will thus be asked to rely on the wider bodily sensorium: on touch, on sound, on smell, on affect. 

The autopsy table encounters envisioned owe a deeply ingrained debt to ‘the cut’: a familiar mainstay of mainstream social sciences that fabricates knowledge through the rigours of dissection, segmentation, conceptualisation, observation, operationalisation, bracketing and other technologies of control and separation.  However, the envisioned autopsical practicings also take seriously and experiment with Barad’s reworking ‘the cut’ as an enactment of contingent rather than absolute separation – of cutting together apart. Our experimentation draws on new materialist and posthuman theories that conceive phenomena as connected entities, emerging from cuts that never produce absolute separation. Phenomena, practices, and processes emerge at the intersection of politics of academic conferences, singular plural, fragmented models and incompletely and messy practising of inquiry, objects imbued with desire, discourses, history and culture. In Law’s (2004) terms the session enacts a ‘method assemblage’ that takes seriously the generative flux of the elusive and ephemeral world that we claim to know through the matrix of method.  The session instantiates a movement from (and threading through of) methodological fabrication toward an enacted stuttering and stammering ‘fabulation’ (Deleuze via O’Sullivan, 2016) for becoming (un)knowing.

National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-35262 (URN)
Conference
After method in organization studies III
Available from: 2017-04-26 Created: 2017-04-26 Last updated: 2018-05-28Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-6998-5034

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