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Sund, L. & Pashby, K. (2018). 'Is it that We Do Not Want them to have washing machines?': Ethical global issues pedagogy in swedish classrooms. Sustainability, 10(10), Article ID 3552.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>'Is it that We Do Not Want them to have washing machines?': Ethical global issues pedagogy in swedish classrooms
2018 (English)In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 10, no 10, article id 3552Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

According to sustainable development target 4.7, by 2030, all signatory nations must ensure learners are provided with education for sustainable development and global citizenship. While many national curricula provide a policy imperative to provide a global dimension in curriculum and teaching, mainstreaming an approach to teaching about sustainable development through pressing global issues requires strong attention to what happens between students and teachers in the classroom. In this article, we aim to help teachers think through an ongoing reflexive approach to teaching by bridging important theoretical and empirical scholarship with the day-to-day pedagogies of global educators. This collaborative praxis offers an actionable approach to engaging with values, conflicts and ethical consequences towards bringing global issues into teaching and learning in a critical and fruitful way. Our results show that teachers and students can both experience discomfort and experience a sense of significance and worthiness of engaging in a more critical approach. In addition, if we critically reflect and support students in doing so, as these teachers have done, we open up possibilities for approaches to global issues pedagogy that come much closer to addressing the pressing issues of our deeply unequal world.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI AG, 2018
Keywords
Collaborative praxis research, Education for sustainable development, Global citizenship education, Postcolonial perspectives
National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-41197 (URN)10.3390/su10103552 (DOI)000448559400194 ()2-s2.0-85054363915 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-10-18 Created: 2018-10-18 Last updated: 2019-01-16Bibliographically approved
Sund, L., Sund, P. & Nordén, B. (2018). Miljö- och hållbarhetsutbildning: Introduktion till temanummer. Pedagogisk forskning i Sverige, 23(3-4), 163-171
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Miljö- och hållbarhetsutbildning: Introduktion till temanummer
2018 (Swedish)In: Pedagogisk forskning i Sverige, ISSN 1401-6788, E-ISSN 2001-3345, ISSN 1401-6788, Vol. 23, no 3-4, p. 163-171Article in journal, Editorial material (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Malmö: , 2018
National Category
Social Sciences Educational Sciences
Research subject
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-41051 (URN)
Available from: 2018-09-28 Created: 2018-09-28 Last updated: 2018-10-01Bibliographically approved
Sund, P. & Sund, L. (2017). ”Alla gör fel?!” – Hinder för lärares bedömning av elevers praktiska förmågor under ett nationellt prov. NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, 13(1), 3-16
Open this publication in new window or tab >>”Alla gör fel?!” – Hinder för lärares bedömning av elevers praktiska förmågor under ett nationellt prov
2017 (Swedish)In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 3-16Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [sv]

Storskaliga och kostsamma nationella tester genomförs i hela västvärlden och tar stora lärarresurser i anspråk. Med stora satsningar som dessa är det viktigt att ställa frågan om betygsunderlaget som genereras är likvärdigt? Studiens titel, ”alla gör fel” anspelar på just detta och kommer från en elevs uttalande då eleven inser det sannolika i att samtliga elever i elevgruppen gör på samma sätt av sociala skäl istället för att använda sig av sina individuella naturvetenskapliga kunskaper. Denna fallstudie undersöker svenska lärares möjligheter att bedöma elevers individuella förmågor i tre undervisningsgrupper under genomförandet av ett praktiskt delmoment i det nationella provet i kemi i åk 9. Datainsamling genomfördes med två fasta videokameror och tre par spionglasögon. Trots att provinstruktioner till elever och lärare är väl utvecklade och bedömningsanvisningar till läraren är detaljerade visar resultaten i denna studie att det är svårt att bedöma elevers individuella praktiska förmågor. Det finns många olika slags faktorer som påverkar provresultatet. En sådan faktor är provet genomförs i en laborationssal där situationen skiljer sig väsentligt från miljön för ett teoretiskt prov i ett klassrum. En annan faktor är att det under den praktiska provdelen i en laborationssal närmast är omöjligt för eleverna att undvika att kommunicera. Studiens resultat visar att det finns påverkansfaktorer som sociala interaktioner och systematiska fysiska felkällor. I resultatet diskuteras hur lärares möjligheter att bedöma elevers individuella praktiska förmågor under nationella prov bättre kan säkerställas.

National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-33035 (URN)
Available from: 2016-09-01 Created: 2016-09-01 Last updated: 2017-11-21Bibliographically approved
Sund, L. (2016). Facing global sustainability issues: teachers’ experiences of their own practices in environmental and sustainability education. Environmental Education Research, 22(6), 788-805
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Facing global sustainability issues: teachers’ experiences of their own practices in environmental and sustainability education
2016 (English)In: Environmental Education Research, ISSN 1350-4622, E-ISSN 1469-5871, Vol. 22, no 6, p. 788-805Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Over the last 20 years, international organisations and national governments have stressed the need for education policies to be (re)oriented towards social change, sustainability and preparing students for life in a global society. This area of pedagogy is not problem free. When policy is turned into practice teachers need to take a number of factors into account, especially when global sustainability issues are complex. In this article I investigate how six teachers with experience of international professional development reflect on and incorporate global sustainability issues in their teaching. These teachers articulated different ways of utilising the curriculum and enacting pedagogies relating to colonialism and complex global issues. The conclusion is that these teachers’ experiences can help us to understand this work and how it can be developed.

Keywords
teaching; global sustainability issues; postcolonial theory; environmental and sustainability education; teaching practice
National Category
Social Sciences Educational Sciences
Research subject
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-32184 (URN)10.1080/13504622.2015.1110744 (DOI)000381376600003 ()2-s2.0-84947935420 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-06-23 Created: 2016-06-23 Last updated: 2017-11-28Bibliographically approved
Sund, L., Quennerstedt, M. & Öhman, M. (2016). The Embodied Social Studies Classroom. In: : . Paper presented at ECER 2016, Leading Education: The Distinct Contributions of Educational Research and Researchers, Dublin, Ireland, 22-26 August, 2016.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Embodied Social Studies Classroom
2016 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In recent years scholars interested in teaching and learning in social studies in schools have showed how learning in social studies classrooms can be understood through instruction, dialogue, cognition, reflection, concepts, thinking, writing, reading and awareness (cf. Bickmore & Parker, 2014; Brooks, 2011; Hess; 2002; Journell, Walker Beeson & Ayers, 2015; King, 2009; Nokes, 2014; Savenije, van Boxtel & Grever, 2014). Despite these important contributions, learning risks being limited to explorations of cognitive, verbal and/or written aspects of the educational situation. 

Learning is, however, very much also embodied, including the embodied interactions with the environment (cf. Shilling, 2000, Zembylas 2007), and research also reveals that secondary social studies is facing a crisis since a majority of students still are made to memorize and reproduce socioscientific knowledge instead of being prepared to use knowledge meaningfully and participating in public discussions (Sandahl 2015; Ljunggren et al. 2015; King 2009). Social studies have accordingly, as many other school subjects, often been handled as dis-embodied (Almqvist & Quennerstedt, 2015; Evans, Davies & Rich 2009), and this gives us a quite limited view of the learning going on in classrooms. The consequences of this gap in research as well as practice are that we miss out on important aspects of what Armour et al. (2015) argues to be “the dazzling complexity of the learning process” (p. 11).

In this presentation we aim to ‘transgress’ the separation of mind and body and explore embodied aspects of learning in the social studies classroom. With a point of departure in John Dewey’s transactional view of learning and Sharon Todd’s discussion on the liminality of pedagogical relationships, the ambition with the papers is not to explore ‘The Learning’ going on, or what every student learn in the explored situations. Instead, we argue that students always enter pedagogical encounters as some-body, and that it correspondingly is fruitful to explore students’ embodied engagements as an important but often overlooked aspect of the social studies classroom. The risk that remains is otherwise that social studies is treated as dis-embodied and that we as a consequence do not fully understand or embrace the potential of social studies.

Hence, the purpose of the study is to explore embodied engagements in a social sciences classroom. The focus in the study is on expected and potential pedagogical encounters and how students’ actions obtain a certain function in the classroom. As a conclusion we will discuss the results of our analysis in terms of the liminality of pedagogical encounters in classroom practice.

Our intent in this study is not to resolve tensions produced by theontological divide between representational and non-representational approachesor the epistemological separation of mind and body. Instead, by turning topragmatism and Dewey’s transactional perspective, we intend to approach socialstudies as embodied rather than dis-embodied. 

Method

By focusing on embodiment in a transactional perspective the attention is turned from bodies as a pre-determined metaphysical entity separated from the mind to what bodies do and become in and through transactions with the environment (Biesta & Tedder 2006; Garrison 2015). Taking a transactional approach, the study puts into focus the ‘lived’, embodied engagements with others (teachers, student peers) and the environment (classroom practice, classroom materiality) they engage in. The analysis is conducted in three steps; (i) distinguishing pedagogical encounters, (ii) identifying embodied engagements, and (iii) categorising embodied engagements by the function of actions-in-context. In this study we focus on situations where the body is foregrounded and the action is connected to subject matter. Accordingly, we are interested in both the pedagogical relation between teacher and students and the didactic relation between subject matter, instructional activities and teachers and students involved. This is described by Hudson (2015) as the didactic triadic that recognises the complex set of relations between teacher, student and content (Cf. Klette 2007). The study has no generalizing ambition since the data comes from a small sample, however, we hope that the insights that can be drawn from this case can be helpful in re-understanding social studies as embodied rather than dis-embodied. The empirical material consists of video recorded lessons from two different subject areas (Criminology and Sociology) in an upper secondary school in Sweden. The content of the lessons is small group activities, whole class lectures and student presentations. The class consisted of 31 students in their final year of the Business Management and Economics Programme. In exploring embodied engagements in a social sciences classroom several challenges arise. As Estola and Elbaz-Luwisch (2003) state “attention to the body is a challenge to both the researchers and the methods used” (p. 715). These challenges can be summarised as the difficulty in exploring the dazzling complexity of any educational situation involving verbal and non-verbal actions and communication, teachers and students, teaching aids, the materiality of the classroom as well as the context as a whole (Cf. Quennerstedt, Öhman & Öhman 2011). In order to handle this complexity the question that guided us in our analysis of our video recorded data was how aspects of embodied engagements manifest themselves in the social studies classroom. As a conclusion we will also discuss the results of our analysis in terms of the liminality of pedagogical encounters in classroom practice.

Expected Outcomes

In the analysis we have identified three embodied engagements in the social studies classroom: (i) disengaged encounters, (ii) screened encounters, (iii) collective inquiry. These embodied engagements describe functions that different actions-in-context have in transaction in the classroom. Each category describes different functional roles that teachers, students, classroom settings, tasks, etc. have in embodied engagements and the direction this takes in the pedagogical encounter. The categories are not mutually exclusive, but instead intertwined with each other in real situations.Disengaged encounters is about how students are made disengaged in transaction with others and the environment in terms of teacher led lessons, peer presentations or disengaging tasks.Screened encounters refer to embodied engagements being both focused towards screens (computers, smart-boards etc) and screened off in terms of how student interaction occurs.Collective inquiry is events when students actively (as some-body) engage in a collective, communicative process guided by conditions of uncertainty and change.These results will be clarified and discussed further in terms of the liminality of embodied engagements in classroom practice with reference to Todd (2014). Todd uses the metaphor of liminality, or the threshold, as a way of discussing that pedagogical relationships in education are “played out materially, between bodies in the present, unpredictably against a future that is always unknown” (p. 243) thus these pedagogical encounters have the potential to be transformative. The paper aims to contribute to earlier research on embodied aspects of learning in Sweden and Europe and to extend the methodological approaches currently in use within the field of subject didactics.

References

Almqvist, J. & Quennerstedt, M. (2015). Is there (any)body in science education? Interchange. A Quarterly review of Education, 46(4), pp 439-453.

Armour, K. Quennerstedt, M. Chambers, F & Makopoulou, K. (2015). What is ‘effective’ CPD for contemporary physical education teachers? A Deweyan framework. Sport, Education and Society, DOI:10.1080/13573322.2015.1083000.

Biesta, G.J.J. & Tedder, M. (2006). How is agency possible? Towards an ecological understanding of agency-as-achievement. Working paper 5, Exeter: The Learning Lives project.

Estola, E. & Elbaz-Luwisch, F. (2003). Teaching bodies at work. Journal of Curriculum Stuides, 35(6), pp. 697–719.

Evans, J., Davies, B. & Rich, E. (2009). The body made flesh: embodied learning and the corporeal device. British Journal of Sociology of Education, 30(4), 391-406.

Garrison, Jim (2015). Dewey’s Aesthetics of Body-Mind Functioning. Aesthetics and the Embodied Mind: Beyond Art Theory and the Cartesian Mind-Body Dichotomy. Alfonsina Scarinzi (ed.), Dordrecht: Springer.

Hess, D. E. (2002). Discussing Controversial Public Issues in Secondary Social Studies Classrooms: Learning from Skilled Teachers. Theory & Research in Social Education, 30(1), 10-41.

Hudson, B. (2015). The epistemology and methodology of curriculum: didactics. In The SAGE handbook of curriculum, pedagogy and assessment, edited by Wyse, Dominic, Hayward, Louise and Pandya, Jessica (eds.) Sage. 

Journell, W, Walker Beeson, M. & Ayers, C. A. (2015). Learning to Think Politically: Toward More Complete Disciplinary Knowledge in Civics and Government Courses. Theory & Research in Social Education, 43(1), pp. 28-67.

King, J. T. (2009). Teaching and Learning about Controversial Issues: Lessons from Northern Ireland, Theory & Research in Social Education, 37(2), pp. 215-246.

Klette, K. (2007). Trends in Research on Teaching and Learning in Schools: didactics meets classroom studies. European Educational Research Journal (online), 6(2), pp. 147-161.

Quennerstedt, M., Öhman, J. & Öhman, M. (2011) Investigating learning in physical education – a transactional approach. Sport, Education and Society, 16:2, 159-177.

Savenije, G. M., van Boxtel C. & Grever, M. (2014). Learning about Sensitive History: “Heritage” of Slavery as a Resource. Theory & Research in Social Education, 42(4), pp. 516-547.

Schilling, C. (2000). The Body. In G. Browning, A. Halcli, & F. Webster (Eds.), Understanding contemporary society: Theories of the present. (pp. 415-432). London: SAGE Publications Ltd.

Todd, S. (2014). Between Body and Spirit: The Liminality of Pedagogical Relationships. Journal of Philosophy of Education, 48(2), pp. 231-245.

Zembylas, M. (2007). The specters of bodies and affects in the classroom: a rhizo‐ethological approach, Pedagogy, Culture & Society, 15(1), pp.19-35.

National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
Sports Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-36366 (URN)
Conference
ECER 2016, Leading Education: The Distinct Contributions of Educational Research and Researchers, Dublin, Ireland, 22-26 August, 2016
Available from: 2016-12-08 Created: 2017-09-07Bibliographically approved
Sund, L., Neilson, A., Spannring, R., Greve Lysgaard, J., Kronlid O., D. & Sund, P. (2015). Can we unpack the global in ESE? An introduction.. In: Neilson, A.L., Spannring, R., Lysgaard, J.G., Kronlid, D. O., Sund, L., Sund, P. (2015). "All Our Relations": Respecting People and Scholarship. Creative roundtable for European Conference on Educational Research. : . Paper presented at The Annual Meeting of the European Conference on Educational Research (ECER) Budapest, Hungary, September 8-11, 2015..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Can we unpack the global in ESE? An introduction.
Show others...
2015 (English)In: Neilson, A.L., Spannring, R., Lysgaard, J.G., Kronlid, D. O., Sund, L., Sund, P. (2015). "All Our Relations": Respecting People and Scholarship. Creative roundtable for European Conference on Educational Research. , 2015Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In seeking co-provocateurs for this roundtable, the initial outreach was fuelled by anger regarding the devaluing of social sciences compared to natural sciences and economics (Mendel, 2014) as well as the frustration of seeing poorly designed research by natural scientists studying human behaviour and education without being informed by protocols and best practices developed for such work by the social sciences (Pooley, Mendelsohn & Milner-Gulland, 2014), and ignorance of deep critical explorations of educational and other social processes by sociologists, anthropologists amongst others (Sund & Lysgaard, 2013). However, the initial response provoked an offer to discuss the role of love in environmental and sustainability education research, ESER. While this reply was clearly housed in the same concerns and critique initially expressed, the use of the word “love”, a powerful concept simultaneously simple and complex, drew us to seek a circle of renewal and remembering of life and lives that may have been forgotten at times within ESER.

The phrase “all our/my relations” comes from indigenous worldviews and practices of honouring all the people who have come before you as well as the other living beings with whom we share this planet (Kulnieks, Longboat & Young, 2013). This round table discussion will honour all our relations by remembering the current and past practices which take on issues related to motivation rooted in social and cultural patterns, as well as politics of knowledge with complex histories and inequities (Glass, Scott & Price, 2012; Sund & Öhman, 2014). We will respect people and scholarship via three main currents of discussion:

  1. The role of love in ESER
  2. “Ignored concepts” - Research and extensive discourse that gets ignored when defining questions that assume people are selfish and have never cooperated to protect the commons, or are not politically active (Gaiser, Rijke & Spanning, 2010) uncritical acceptance of people/nature dichotomy, uncritical use of education as transferring information from expert to ignorant.
  3. Political dimensions of ESER (postcolonial lens, global inequities, poverty in the “south”)

The discussions will flow at the level of and through individuals, but also at infrastructural and conceptual spaces and places. Creative methodologies provide powerful avenues to disrupt imbalances and injustices and take into account issues of representation, legitimation and politics in research as well as communications about research (McKenzie, 2005). Philip Payne (2005) challenges the limitations of textual discourse as a way of knowing; he focuses on “being, doing and becoming a relational, social and ecological ‘self’” (p. 415) and suggests that strong cultural production constrains these qualities. Framing, metaphors and narratives are important for meaning making (Lakoff, 2010) and are particularly important to deconstruct when challenging dominant views that may have been taken as common sense (Stone-Mediatore, 2003), as well as inviting critical reflection on the very story being told. We will use creative juxtapositioning of the currents of discussion in order to evoke deeper insights than may arise from sequential presentations of the three discussion themes (Neilson, 2009). Additionally, the format of the round table will include multiple forms of communications to involve all who attend, and, the participants along with the provocateurs will physically be seated within a circle.

References

Gaiser, W., Rijke, J.D., & Spanning, R. (2010). Youth and political participation – empirical results for Germany within a European context. Youth 18(4), 427-450. Glass, J. H., Scott, A., & Price, M. F. (2012). Getting active at the interface: How can sustainability researchers stimulate social learning? In A. Wals & P. Blaze Concoran (Eds.) Learning for sustainability in times of accelerating change. pp. 167-183. Wageningen University Press, NL. Kronlid, D.O., & Öhman, J. (2012). An environmental ethical conceptual framework for research on sustainability and environmental education. Environmental Education Research, ifirst article, 1-24. Kulnieks, A., Longboat, D. R. & Young, K. (2013). Contemporary Studies in Environmental and Indigenous Pedagogies. A Curricula of Stories and Place. Rotterdam: Sense Publishers. Lakoff, G. (2010). Praxis forum. Why it matters how we frame the environment. Environmental Communication, 4(1), 70-81. McKenzie, M. (2005). The ‘post-post period’ and environmental education research. Environmental Education Research, 11(4), 401-412. Mendel, J. (2014). Bad Research and High Impact: The Science: So What Campaign and Social Media Criticism. ACME: An International E-Journal for Critical Geographies, 13(1), 56-61. Neilson, A. L. (2009). The power of nature and the nature of power. Special Issue: Inquiries into practice. Canadian Journal of Environmental Education, 14, 136-148. Payne, P. (2005). Lifeworld and textualism: Reassembling the researcher/ed and ‘others’. Environmental Education Research, 11(4), 413-431. Pooley, S. P., Mendelsohn, J. A., & Milner‐Gulland, E. J. (2014). Hunting Down the Chimera of Multiple Disciplinarity in Conservation Science. Conservation Biology, 28(1), 22-32. Stone-Mediatore, S. (2003). Reading across border: Storytelling and knowledges of resistance. New York, NY: Palgrave. Sund, L., & Öhman, J. (2014). On the need to repoliticise environmental and sustainability education: Rethinking the postpolitical consensus. Environmental Education Research, 20(5), 639-659. Sund, P., & Lysgaard, J. (2013). Reclaim “Education” in Environmental and Sustainability Education Research. Sustainability, 5(4), 1598–1616.

National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-36353 (URN)
Conference
The Annual Meeting of the European Conference on Educational Research (ECER) Budapest, Hungary, September 8-11, 2015.
Available from: 2017-09-07 Created: 2017-09-07 Last updated: 2017-10-06Bibliographically approved
Sund, L. (2014). Om global etik i miljö- och hållbarhetsutbildningens policy och praktik. (Doctoral dissertation). Örebro: Örebro university
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Om global etik i miljö- och hållbarhetsutbildningens policy och praktik
2014 (Swedish)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This thesis takes its point of departure in the change of emphasis in the field of environmental and sustainability education (ESE) towards the inclusion of social and human development issues. The theoretical frames of the thesis are poststructural and postcolonial theories, from which different writings, central concepts and approaches are drawn. The thesis also builds on a pragmatist and anti-essentialist approach which argues that we socially construct the meaning of right and wrong and what works better in our lives on the current problematic or situation. The results are presented in four studies and the thesis has three purposes. The first purpose is to describe and investigate theoretical perspectives that take a critical stand on and offer alternatives to universal and consensus-oriented approaches. This purpose is the central focus in the first and second studies. The first study examines the re-emergence of classical cosmopolitanism and contemporary views of the perspective with the intent of discussing its potential for the development of education for sustainable development (ESD). The second study aims to clarify the philosophical problem of addressing universally sustainable responsibilities and values in environmental and sustainability education. The second purpose is to investigate teachers’ ethical reflections in a first-hand intercultural experience. This purpose is dealt with in the third study, where seven Swedish upper secondary school teachers facing particular conflicts of interest and moral situations during a study visit to Central America are interviewed. The third purpose is to investigate how teachers deal with the complex issues of intragenerational equity or social justice in their teaching. This is dealt with in the fourth study, which explores how teachers integrate issues of social justice into their teaching of global sustainability. My hope is that this thesis will contribute to the discussion about how teachers can develop a conscious and critically informed approach to the teaching of environmental and sustainability issues and also contribute to theoretical and philosophical discussions about universalism, normativity and global ethics within environmental and sustainability education research.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Örebro: Örebro university, 2014. p. 98
Keywords
environmental and sustainability education, education for sustainable development, global ethics, morals, social justice, poststructural and postcolonial theories, pragmatism
National Category
Pedagogy
Research subject
Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-36364 (URN)978-91-7529-051-5 (ISBN)
Public defence
2014-12-12, Prismahuset, Hörsal 2, Örebro universitet, 13:15 (Swedish)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2017-09-21 Created: 2017-09-07 Last updated: 2017-09-21Bibliographically approved
Sund, L. & Öhman, J. (2014). On the need to repoliticise environmental and sustainability education: rethinking the post-political consensus. Environmental Education Research, 20(5), 639-659
Open this publication in new window or tab >>On the need to repoliticise environmental and sustainability education: rethinking the post-political consensus
2014 (English)In: Environmental Education Research, ISSN 1350-4622, E-ISSN 1469-5871, Vol. 20, no 5, p. 639-659Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article draws attention to the possibilities of the ongoing philosophical discussion about cosmopolitan universal values in relation to the normative challenges in environmental and sustainability education (ESE). The purpose of this paper is to clarify the philosophical problems of addressing universally sustainable responsibilities and values in ESE. Our arguments draw inspiration from the work of three poststructuralist scholars: we explore how Butler develops her claim that universal assertion requires a cultural translation, how Mouffe exposes the political in universal claim and how Todd argues that education needs to introduce students to a political language that enables them to critically reflect on their own and other groups’ values and actions. In the concluding part, we suggest the following guidelines for rethinking ESE: unmasking the political dimension, re-politicising education, seeing beyond the relativist and objectivist divide and using passion as a moving force.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2014
Keywords
environmental and sustainability education, cosmopolitanism, pluralism, political, normativity, universal values
National Category
Social Sciences Pedagogy
Research subject
Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-36368 (URN)10.1080/13504622.2013.833585 (DOI)000342804400003 ()2-s2.0-84884186048 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2013-11-05 Created: 2017-09-07Bibliographically approved
Sund, L. & Öhman, J. (2014). Swedish teachers’ ethical reflections on a study visit to Central America. Journal of Moral Education, 43(3), 316-331
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Swedish teachers’ ethical reflections on a study visit to Central America
2014 (English)In: Journal of Moral Education, ISSN 0305-7240, E-ISSN 1465-3877, Vol. 43, no 3, p. 316-331Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this article we argue that culturally variable values and morals have a key role in educational initiatives that address a global dimension. The article suggests that looking at values and morals in relation to a teaching practice is a way of adding knowledge to this field. Our study inquires into how an intercultural experience can evoke ethical reflections on environmental and sustainability issues. The article is based on a qualitative empirical study of teachers’ experiences of a teacher development programme, where we analyse the variety of ethical reflections that emerge during a study visit to a Central American country. We build on a pragmatic analytical approach that takes John Dewey’s ethical thoughts on moral situations as a point of departure and deals with teachers’ ethical reflections in a way that takes the contextual and situated nature of morals into account.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2014
Keywords
teachers' professional development, ethical reflections, Dewey
National Category
Social Sciences Pedagogy
Research subject
Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-36363 (URN)10.1080/03057240.2014.920309 (DOI)000341417200007 ()2-s2.0-84902702548 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2014-08-05 Created: 2017-09-07Bibliographically approved
Sund, L. & Öhman, J. (2013). Teachers’ ethical reflections on a North–South study visit. In: : . Paper presented at ECER i Istanbul, Turkiet, 10–13 september, 2013..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Teachers’ ethical reflections on a North–South study visit
2013 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Pedagogy
Research subject
Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-36367 (URN)
Conference
ECER i Istanbul, Turkiet, 10–13 september, 2013.
Available from: 2014-01-27 Created: 2017-09-07Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-3690-9879

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