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Osterman, C. & Fundin, A. (2018). Understanding company specific Lean production systems. Is Lean getting lost in translation?. In: 25th Annual EurOMA conference EurOMA: . Paper presented at 25th Annual EurOMA conference EurOMA, 24 Jun 2018, Budapest, Hungary. Budapest, Hungary
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Understanding company specific Lean production systems. Is Lean getting lost in translation?
2018 (English)In: 25th Annual EurOMA conference EurOMA, Budapest, Hungary, 2018Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This research explores how Lean could be translated from a generic concept into a company specific production system (XPS). These types of translations are in practise often made by a XPS Support Function (XPS SF). The XPS SF of three cases serves as respondents. Theoretical implications of this research concern the translation of Lean as an important tool to understand the integration of Lean. Managerial implications concern the role of using translations of all Lean principles to develop a system that develops over time. Even if Lean is not completely lost in translation there are considerable difficulties to overcome.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Budapest, Hungary: , 2018
Keywords
Lean, Production system, Translation
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-40883 (URN)
Conference
25th Annual EurOMA conference EurOMA, 24 Jun 2018, Budapest, Hungary
Projects
XPRES - Excellence in Production ResearchINNOFACTURE - innovative manufacturing development
Available from: 2018-09-18 Created: 2018-09-18 Last updated: 2018-09-18Bibliographically approved
Johansson, P. & Osterman, C. (2017). Conceptions and operational use of value and waste in lean manufacturing - an interpretivist approach. International Journal of Production Research, 55(23), 6903-6915
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Conceptions and operational use of value and waste in lean manufacturing - an interpretivist approach
2017 (English)In: International Journal of Production Research, ISSN 0020-7543, E-ISSN 1366-588X, Vol. 55, no 23, p. 6903-6915Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this article, we explore how the key concepts of lean manufacturing, value, value adding and waste are conceived and operationally used by Lean trainers in operational work processes. A comparative case study with a mixed method approach, using an explanatory sequential design, was conducted. This means that a set of quantitative data were collected, which was followed by the collection of qualitative data with the purpose of explaining and understanding the quantitative measures. An interpretivist approach is used as a framework, which implies a perspective on contemporary operations management paradigms, such as lean manufacturing, as a continuous construction of inter-subjective experiences. What becomes evident in the empirical findings is that there are both similarities and differences in the Lean trainers conceptions and use of value adding and waste. The similarities and differences can be explained by variations in two dimensions: (a) the character of the work process, which ranges between mechanical and craftsmanship, and (b) Lean trainers approach to key concepts, which ranges between being rule-based and reflective. By using a research design where the concepts of value adding and waste were used simultaneously, and adopting an interpretivist approach on lean manufacturing, we were able to reveal conditions that in other cases remain hidden.

Keywords
Lean manufacturing, value, waste, work organisation, interpretivist approach
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-35511 (URN)10.1080/00207543.2017.1326642 (DOI)000423134100001 ()2-s2.0-85019258655 (Scopus ID)
Projects
INNOFACTURE - innovative manufacturing developmentEmbedding innovation-oriented work within lean-production systems
Available from: 2017-05-31 Created: 2017-05-31 Last updated: 2018-02-22Bibliographically approved
Osterman, C. (2015). Towards a Lean Integration of Lean. (Licentiate dissertation). Eskilstuna: Mälardalen University
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Towards a Lean Integration of Lean
2015 (English)Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Integrating Lean in a process has become increasingly popular over the last decades. Lean as a concept has spread through industry into other sectors such as service, healthcare, and administration. The overwhelming experience from this spread is that Lean is difficult to integrate successfully. It takes a long time and requires large resources in the integration,

as it permeates all aspects of a process. Lean is a system depending on both tools and methods as well as human effort and behavior. There is therefore a need to understand the integration process itself. As many companies have worked with the integration of Lean, there should be a great deal of accumulated knowledge.

The overall intent of this research is therefore to examine how a current state of a Lean integration can be established, that takes into account the dualism of Lean regarding the technical components of Lean, as well as the humanistic components of Lean. Both issues must be addressed if the integration process of Lean is to be efficient. 

Through a literature review, eight views of Lean are established. Taking into consideration historical, foundational, and evolutionary tools and methods, systems, philosophical, cultural, and management views, a comprehensive model of Lean at a group level in a process is proposed. Through two multiple-case studies, the experiences of actual Lean integrations are compared with Lean theory to establish a current state of a Lean integration. There were large similarities in the experiences but also differences due to context and the complexity of Lean as a system. The current state is described in:

  • 9 instances of strongly positive findings. They are often simple tools and methods.
  • 11 instances of weakly positive findings. They are often of a system nature in the dependencies between the Lean methods.
  • 3 instances with vague findings. Seems to be due to lack of focus on the intent of integrating Lean.
  • 3 instances of mixed findings. Can often be connected to personal commitment and the creation of efficient islands.
  • 3 instances of conflicting findings. Seem to be connected to contextual factors.
  • 3 instances of insufficient data. The indications are too few to draw any conclusions. 

Accurately establishing the current state of the Lean integration process is seen as a necessary first step of a Lean integration of Lean.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Eskilstuna: Mälardalen University, 2015. p. 155
Series
Mälardalen University Press Licentiate Theses, ISSN 1651-9256 ; 205
Keywords
Lean Integration Flexibility Management
National Category
Work Sciences
Research subject
Working Life Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-27897 (URN)978-91-7485-208-0 (ISBN)
Presentation
2015-06-09, Filen, Mälardalens högskola, Eskilstuna, 10:00 (Swedish)
Opponent
Supervisors
Funder
Knowledge Foundation
Available from: 2015-04-27 Created: 2015-04-24 Last updated: 2015-05-18Bibliographically approved
Osterman, C., Svensson Harari, N. & Lundin, A. (2014). Examination of the flexibility paradox in a Lean system. In: : . Paper presented at 58th EOQ conference, 10-13 June, 2014, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Examination of the flexibility paradox in a Lean system
2014 (English)In: , 2014Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper explores if Lean is to be considered flexible or not. A multiple case study in the automotive industry is conducted to find the dependencies between Lean and flexibility. Since many definitions of flexibility and Lean exists, a pragmatic approach is sought where each cases own definition of Lean is used to analyze if the factors that enable flexibility are to be considered Lean or not. The context of this paper is volume and product flexibility.

Lean and flexibility are found to be independent of each other in a direct sense. However, indirectly it is found that flexibility in a Lean context is achieved through decisions made when finding solution during problem solving. Also, the level of flexibility can also be seen as a decision. Therefore Lean in itself cannot be regarded as either flexible nor inflexible but flexibility can be achieved when choosing solutions to particular problems.

Keywords
Lean, Assembly systems, Flexibility, Variation, Efficiency, Mixed model lines
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Research subject
Industrial Economics and Organisations
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-27896 (URN)
Conference
58th EOQ conference, 10-13 June, 2014, Gothenburg, Sweden
Funder
Knowledge Foundation
Available from: 2015-04-24 Created: 2015-04-24 Last updated: 2015-10-01Bibliographically approved
Svensson Harari, N., Osterman, C., Bruch, J. & Jackson, M. (2014). Flexibility in Lean Mixed Model Assembly Lines. In: IFIP Advances in Information and Communication Technology, Vol. 440: . Paper presented at IFIP WG 5.7 International Conference on Advances in Production Management Systems, APMS 2014; Ajaccio; France; 20 September 2014 through 24 September 2014 (pp. 224-231). (PART 3)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Flexibility in Lean Mixed Model Assembly Lines
2014 (English)In: IFIP Advances in Information and Communication Technology, Vol. 440, 2014, no PART 3, p. 224-231Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The purpose of the research presented in this paper has been to characterize flexibility in lean mixed model assembly lines through exploring mechanisms used to achieve flexibility. The study combines a literature review and a multiple case study in two manufacturing companies. Scenarios of volume, mix and operation flexibility, as well as flexibility to introduce or remove products were studied. The results showed that to achieve flexibility related to these scenarios other kinds of flexibilities were used. Common mechanisms to achieve flexibility have been found in the two cases. A characterization of mixed model assembly lines regarding flexibility will be discussed. 

Keywords
flexibility, lean, Mixed model assembly lines
National Category
Other Engineering and Technologies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-25978 (URN)10.1007/978-3-662-44733-8_28 (DOI)000360158500028 ()2-s2.0-84906923655 (Scopus ID)9783662447321 (ISBN)
Conference
IFIP WG 5.7 International Conference on Advances in Production Management Systems, APMS 2014; Ajaccio; France; 20 September 2014 through 24 September 2014
Available from: 2014-09-19 Created: 2014-09-19 Last updated: 2019-01-10Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-1518-7958

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