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Mazaheri, M., Ericson-Lidman, E., Zargham-Boroujeni, A., Öhlén, J. & Norberg, A. (2017). Clear conscience grounded in relations: Expressions of Persian-speaking nurses in Sweden. Nursing ethics, 3(1), 349-361
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Clear conscience grounded in relations: Expressions of Persian-speaking nurses in Sweden
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2017 (English)In: Nursing ethics, ISSN 0969-7330, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 349-361Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Conscience is an important concept in ethics, having various meanings in different cultures. Because a growing number of healthcare professionals are of immigrant background, particularly within the care of older people, demanding multiple ethical positions, it is important to explore the meaning of conscience among care providers within different cultural contexts.

Research objective: The study aimed to illuminate the meaning of conscience by enrolled nurses with an Iranian background working in residential care for Persian-speaking people with dementia.

Research design: A phenomenological hermeneutical method guided the study.

Participants and research context: A total of 10 enrolled nurses with Iranian background, aged 33–46 years, participated in the study. All worked full time in residential care settings for Persian-speaking people with dementia in a large city, in Sweden.

Ethical considerations: The study was approved by the Regional Ethical Review Board for ethical vetting of research involving humans. Participants were given verbal and written study information and assured that their participation was voluntary and confidential.

Findings: Three themes were constructed including perception of conscience, clear conscience grounded in relations and striving to keep a clear conscience. The conscience was perceived as an inner guide grounded in feelings, which is dynamic and subject to changes throughout life. Having a clear conscience meant being able to form a bond with others, to respect them and to get their confirmation that one does well. To have a clear conscience demanded listening to the voice of the conscience. The enrolled nurses strived to keep their conscience clear by being generous in helping others, accomplishing daily tasks well and behaving nicely in the hope of being treated the same way one day.

Conclusion: Cultural frameworks and the context of practice needed to be considered in interpreting the meaning of conscience and clear conscience.

Keywords
conscience, culture, Care provider, conscience, dementia, immigrant, Persian-speaking residential care
National Category
Health Sciences
Research subject
Care Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-30753 (URN)10.1177/0969733015603442 (DOI)000401584200009 ()26385903 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85019845901 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-01-18 Created: 2016-01-18 Last updated: 2018-10-16Bibliographically approved
Pietilä Rosendahl, S., Söderman, M. & Mazaheri, M. (2016). Immigrants with dementia in Swedish residential care: An exploratory study of the experiences of their family members and nursing staff. BMC Geriatrics, 16(18)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Immigrants with dementia in Swedish residential care: An exploratory study of the experiences of their family members and nursing staff
2016 (English)In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 16, no 18Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

Worldwide, there is a growing population of older people who develop dementia in a country other than that of their origin. When their dementia has reached an advanced stage, residential care is most often needed. People with dementia in Sweden are often cared for in group homes. For immigrants, this may mean a linguistically challenging care environment for both healthcare staff and the patients’ family members.

The aim of this study was to explore and describe the experiences of family members and professional caregivers regarding the care provided to immigrants with dementia in group homes in Sweden.

Methods

An exploratory, descriptive study with a qualitative approach was chosen. In-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted with nine professional caregivers and five family members of people with dementia with Finnish, Estonian, Hungarian and Ingrian backgrounds; all were chosen purposefully. All people with dementia had lost their Swedish language skills as their second language. The data was analysed using qualitative content analysis.

Results

Three main categories and seven subcategories were identified. The first main category: A new living situation comprised the subcategories: adjusting to new living arrangements and expectations regarding activities and traditional food at the group home, the second main category: Challenges in communication with the subcategories: limited communication between the immigrant with dementia and the Swedish-speaking nursing staff and the consequences of linguistic misunderstandings and nuanced communication in a common language and the third main category: The role of the family member at the group home with the subcategories: a link to the healthy life story of the family member with dementia andan expert and interpreter for the nursing staff.

Conclusions

The family member played a crucial role in the lives of immigrants with dementia living in a group home by facilitating communication between the nursing staff and the PWD and also by making it possible for PWD to access the cultural activities they wanted and which professional caregivers were either not able to recognise as needed or could not deliver.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2016
Keywords
communication. dementia, family member, group home, nursing
National Category
Health Sciences
Research subject
Care Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-30732 (URN)10.1186/s12877-016-0200-y (DOI)000368075700002 ()2-s2.0-84954413376 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-01-17 Created: 2016-01-17 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Mazaheri, M. & Ardalan, A. (2016). Older people in disasters. Paper presented at Qualitative Health Research (QHR) Conference. International Journal of Qualitative Methods, 15(1)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Older people in disasters
2016 (English)In: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, ISSN 1609-4069, E-ISSN 1609-4069, Vol. 15, no 1Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Keywords
dementia, older people
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-30756 (URN)000389921700123 ()
Conference
Qualitative Health Research (QHR) Conference
Available from: 2016-01-18 Created: 2016-01-18 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Chatchumni, M., Namvongprom, A., Eriksson, H. & Mazaheri, M. (2016). Thai Nurses' experiences of post-operative pain assessment and its' influence on pain management decisions. BMC Nursing, 15(1), Article ID 12.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Thai Nurses' experiences of post-operative pain assessment and its' influence on pain management decisions
2016 (English)In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 15, no 1, article id 12Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: While many studies have addressed various issues with regards to pain management, there is limited knowledge about how nurses assess pain in surgical wards. This study aimed to describe Thai nurses' experiences of pain assessment in a surgical ward.

METHODS: A cross-sectional explorative study was conducted. Participants were selected through theoretical sampling. Data was collected through interviews with twelve registered nurses working in surgical wards. Qualitative content analysis guided the analysis of the data.

RESULTS: Nurses use a double/triple check system, communicated to the healthcare team via records and protocols, and they used their skills and experiences in pain assessment. The results showed that nurses missed the opportunity to include the patients' self-reported pain in their accounts. Though much evidence of pain was collected, this did not seem to benefit the patients. Furthermore, the nurses were not using instruments to measure pain, which illustrates the potential unreliability of professionals who have differing opinions concerning the patients' pain.

CONCLUSIONS: Thai nurses worked based on a 'patient-evidence' paradigm when assessing patients in pain; this should be shifted to an evidence-based paradigm. Furthermore, by including the patients' self-reported pain in their assessment, nurses would both improve the quality of the pain assessment and empower patients in their pain management. Pain management practices in Thailand should be improved through education, training, supportive innovation, and collegial competence development in order to improve the quality of care in the post-operative field.

National Category
Health Sciences
Research subject
Care Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-31375 (URN)10.1186/s12912-016-0136-8 (DOI)000377515800001 ()26933384 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84962081921 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-04-04 Created: 2016-04-04 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Ehrlich, K., Boström, A.-M., Mazaheri, M., Heikkilä, K. & Emami, A. (2015). Family caregivers’ assessments of caring for a relative with dementia: A comparison of urban and rural areas. International Journal of Older People Nursing, 10(1), 27-37
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Family caregivers’ assessments of caring for a relative with dementia: A comparison of urban and rural areas
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2015 (English)In: International Journal of Older People Nursing, ISSN 1748-3735, E-ISSN 1748-3743, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 27-37Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: This study aimed to describe and compare urban and rural family caregivers' reactions to caring for a relative with dementia and to examine the associations between caregiving and socio-demographic factors. Background: Most studies on family caregivers' experiences caring for older people with dementia have been conducted in urban areas, and little is known about the experiences of family caregivers living in rural areas. Design: A cross-sectional study design was used. Methods: A total of 102 caregivers (response rate 85%) from urban (n = 57) and rural (n = 46) areas completed the Caregiver Reaction Assessment (CRA) Scale and demographic information. Data were analysed using descriptive and inferential statistics and linear regression models. Results: Overall, family caregivers reported high satisfaction even if they also reported high impact on finances and daily living. Rural caregivers experienced a higher negative impact on finances but reported more support from family members than urban caregivers. Age, gender and relationship were significantly associated with four of the five CRA subscales. Educational level and geographical setting were not associated with any of the CRA subscales. Conclusions: The results of the study raise questions about the financial situation of older female caregivers and on the expectations of built-in family structures in urban and rural areas. Further studies focusing on the meaning and constitution of a family would help us to understand how these factors influence family caregiving both in rural and urban areas. Implications for practice: To provide person-centred care and to avoid stereotyped caregiving, a better picture of traditions in family caregiving can improve a more differentiated and appropriate professional caregiving pliable with the cultural context in which it is carried out.

Keywords
Dementia, rural, urban, relative, family member
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Health Sciences
Research subject
Care Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-26718 (URN)10.1111/opn.12044 (DOI)000359833500004 ()2-s2.0-84921722771 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2014-11-28 Created: 2014-11-28 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Chatchumni, M., Namvongprom, A., Sandborgh, M., Mazaheri, M. & Eriksson, H. (2015). Nurses’ perceptions of patients in pain and pain management: a focus group study in Thailand. Pacific Rim International Journal of Nursing Research, 19(2), 164-177
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nurses’ perceptions of patients in pain and pain management: a focus group study in Thailand
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2015 (English)In: Pacific Rim International Journal of Nursing Research, ISSN 1906-8107, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 164-177Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In Thailand, nurses have a key role in the assessment of symptoms and advising on pain management in patients with post-operative in a surgical ward. This study provides insight into nurses’ perceptions of patients in pain and subsequent pain management. A focus group discussion method was used with 18 registered nurses working in surgical wards. The data were analysed using qualitative content analysis. The participants’ descriptions of their perceptions of patients in pain and pain management were condensed into four themes. Two themes revolved around their perceptions of patient pain, uncomfortable patient, and restricted mobility and changed mood. The two remaining themes comprised intolerable pain would be managed, and managing pain through our own experience seems to be of importance in their professional assumption that evidence-based practice is inadequate for patients’ postoperative care. It is suggested that nurses work to a organized pain assessment guideline and pain management models according to cultural contexts. This should be developed within an understanding of the nurse-patient relationship, and specifically holistic nursing models of care can play an important role in bridging the connection between training and practice, not only between personal and professional perceptions of pain and selected strategies, but also between professional knowledge and nurses’ perceptions of patients in pain.The findings may have relevance for other similar contexts and settings.

National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-28237 (URN)000366099700007 ()
Available from: 2015-06-11 Created: 2015-06-11 Last updated: 2016-06-02Bibliographically approved
Mazaheri, M. (2015). Pain management as ambition and practice can the gap be closed?. In: : . Paper presented at Nordic Conference on Advances in Health Care Sciences Research, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden 11-12 November, 2015..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pain management as ambition and practice can the gap be closed?
2015 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-30759 (URN)
Conference
Nordic Conference on Advances in Health Care Sciences Research, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden 11-12 November, 2015.
Available from: 2016-01-18 Created: 2016-01-18 Last updated: 2016-04-21Bibliographically approved
Mazaheri, M. (2015). Perception of conscience among enrolled nurses with an Iranian background working in residential care for Persian-speaking people with dementia disease. In: : . Paper presented at Issues in Bioethics and Philosophy of Medicine.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Perception of conscience among enrolled nurses with an Iranian background working in residential care for Persian-speaking people with dementia disease
2015 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-30760 (URN)
Conference
Issues in Bioethics and Philosophy of Medicine
Available from: 2016-01-18 Created: 2016-01-18 Last updated: 2016-01-19Bibliographically approved
Mazaheri, M. (2015). Post-earthquake health needs: Experiences of Iranian older people. In: : . Paper presented at Human rights and health and the Astrid Janzon symposium – the Swedish Red Cross University College, Stockholm 26-27th November.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Post-earthquake health needs: Experiences of Iranian older people
2015 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-30758 (URN)
Conference
Human rights and health and the Astrid Janzon symposium – the Swedish Red Cross University College, Stockholm 26-27th November
Available from: 2016-01-18 Created: 2016-01-18 Last updated: 2016-04-21Bibliographically approved
Mazaheri, M. (2015). To become old and develop dementia in a foreign country. In: : . Paper presented at Human rights and health and the Astrid Janzon symposium – the Swedish Red Cross University College, Stockholm 26-27th November.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>To become old and develop dementia in a foreign country
2015 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-30757 (URN)
Conference
Human rights and health and the Astrid Janzon symposium – the Swedish Red Cross University College, Stockholm 26-27th November
Available from: 2016-01-18 Created: 2016-01-18 Last updated: 2016-12-27Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-3589-318X

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