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Publications (10 of 16) Show all publications
Guberman, G. I., Robitaille, M.-P., Peter, L., Ptito, A., Vitaro, F., Tremblay, R. E. & Hodgins, S. (2019). Are Traumatic Brain Injuries Associated With Criminality After Taking Account of Childhood Family Social Status and Disruptive Behaviors?. The Journal of Neuropsychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences, 31(2), 123-131
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Are Traumatic Brain Injuries Associated With Criminality After Taking Account of Childhood Family Social Status and Disruptive Behaviors?
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2019 (English)In: The Journal of Neuropsychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences, ISSN 0895-0172, E-ISSN 1545-7222, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 123-131Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: The authors aimed to elucidate the links between traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) and criminal convictions in a sample of 724 Canadian males with and without criminal records followed up to age 24. Methods: Prospectively collected data were analyzed to determine whether prior TBIs predicted subsequent criminal convictions after taking account of family social status (FSS) and childhood disruptive behaviors. At age 24, diagnoses of TBIs were extracted from health records and convictions from official criminal records. In childhood, teachers rated disruptive behaviors and parents reported FSS. Results: Proportionately more individuals with offender status than nonoffender status sustained a TBI from age 18 to age 24 but not before age 18. Individuals with offender status who had sustained a TBI before and after their first conviction were similar in numbers, were raised in families of low social status, and presented high levels of disruptive behaviors from age 6 to age 12. When FSS and childhood disruptive behaviors were included in multivariable regression models, sustaining a prior TBI was not associated with an increased risk of juvenile convictions for any type of crime, for violent crimes, for convictions for any crime or violent crime from age 18 to age 24, or for a first crime or a first violent crime from age 18 to age 24. Conclusions: Among males, there was no evidence that prior TBIs were associated with an increased risk of subsequent criminal convictions from age 12 to age 24 when taking account of FSS and childhood disruptive behaviors, although these latter factors may be associated with an increased prevalence of TBIs among adult offenders.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
AMER PSYCHIATRIC PUBLISHING, INC, 2019
National Category
Other Medical Sciences Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-43419 (URN)10.1176/appi.neuropsych.18040094 (DOI)000465440600004 ()30537914 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85065114824 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-05-09 Created: 2019-05-09 Last updated: 2019-06-11Bibliographically approved
Wahlström, E., Harder, M., Granlund, M., Holmström, I. K., Peter, L. & Golsäter, M. (2019). How culturally competent are Swedish school nurses? Relations between school nurses self-assessed cultural competence and demographic variables when encountering children of foreign origin. In: School nurses international, Stockholm, Sweden: . Paper presented at School nurses international, Stockholm, Sweden.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How culturally competent are Swedish school nurses? Relations between school nurses self-assessed cultural competence and demographic variables when encountering children of foreign origin
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2019 (English)In: School nurses international, Stockholm, Sweden, 2019Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-45438 (URN)
Conference
School nurses international, Stockholm, Sweden
Available from: 2019-10-07 Created: 2019-10-07 Last updated: 2019-10-14Bibliographically approved
Raninen, J., Livingston, M., Karlsson, P., Leifman, H., Guttormsson, U., Svensson, J. & Peter, L. (2018). One explanation to rule them all?: Identifying sub-groups of non-drinking Swedish ninth graders. Drug and Alcohol Review, 37, S42-S48
Open this publication in new window or tab >>One explanation to rule them all?: Identifying sub-groups of non-drinking Swedish ninth graders
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2018 (English)In: Drug and Alcohol Review, ISSN 0959-5236, E-ISSN 1465-3362, Vol. 37, p. S42-S48Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction and Aims: Researchers in a number of countries have recently identified major changes in adolescent alcohol consumption since the early 2000s, with the prevalence of teenage drinking more than halving in some countries. The major aims of the current study are to examine if there are sub-groups among non-drinking Swedish ninth graders and to describe how the prevalence of these groups has changed during the period 1999 to 2015. Design and Methods: Data from five waves of the Swedish European School Survey Project on Alcohol and other Drugs study was used. The data covered 16 years and the total sample comprised 14 976 students. Latent class analysis was used to identify sub-groups of non-drinkers (n = 4267) based on parental approval towards drinking, parental monitoring, leisure time activities, school performance and use of other substances. Results: Five latent classes were found: computer gamers (8.3%), strict parents (36.5%), liberal parents (27.0%), controlling but liberal parents (16.6%) and sports (11.6%). In the non-drinking sub-group the strict parents group increased most between 1999 and 2015. Discussion and Conclusions: The results imply that there is notable within-group diversity in non-drinking youth. Several mechanisms and explanations are thus likely to be behind the decline in drinking participation among Swedish adolescents.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Blackwell Publishing, 2018
Keywords
adolescents, alcohol, latent class, non-drinking, Sweden
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-39233 (URN)10.1111/dar.12663 (DOI)000431986800006 ()29405460 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85046534706 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-05-17 Created: 2018-05-17 Last updated: 2018-10-16Bibliographically approved
Peter, L., Livingston, M., Svensson, J., Leifman, H. & Raninen, J. (2018). The increased trend of non-drinking in adolescence: The role of parental monitoring and attitudes toward offspring drinking. Drug and Alcohol Review, 37, S34-S41
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The increased trend of non-drinking in adolescence: The role of parental monitoring and attitudes toward offspring drinking
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2018 (English)In: Drug and Alcohol Review, ISSN 0959-5236, E-ISSN 1465-3362, Vol. 37, p. S34-S41Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introductions and AimsThe proportion of adolescents who do not drink alcohol has increased during the last decade in many European countries, the USA and Australia. Few studies have addressed why this positive trend has occurred. The aim of the present study is to examine associations between parenting factors, peers' alcohol use and non-drinking among 15- to 16-year-old adolescents over time, from 2003 to 2015, and to evaluate potential gender differences. Design and MethodsData from the Swedish subsample of European School Survey Project on Alcohol and Other Drugs were used. Data were available for 2003, 2007, 2011 and 2015 in nation-based samples with responses from 11531 adolescents in total. ResultsThe proportion of non-drinkers increased from 23.2% in 2003 to 48.7% in 2015. For each year, indicators of especially restrictive attitudes toward offspring drinking were robustly associated with an increased probability of non-drinking. However, neither indicators of parental monitoring nor parental attitudes toward offspring drinking were associated with the increase in the proportion of non-drinkers that occurred from 2003 to 2015. Two indicators of parental monitoring were more strongly associated with non-drinking among girls than among boys, while paternal restrictive attitudes toward offspring drinking were more strongly associated with non-drinking among boys than girls. Discussion and ConclusionsParenting characteristics are important for adolescents who do not use alcohol, which has implications for prevention strategies. However, the increased trend of non-drinkers could not be attributed to parental factors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY, 2018
Keywords
adolescence, alcohol, non-drinkers, parenting
National Category
Other Medical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-39637 (URN)10.1111/dar.12682 (DOI)000431986800005 ()29473244 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85042382045 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-06-07 Created: 2018-06-07 Last updated: 2018-09-19Bibliographically approved
Bamvita, J., Peter, L., Checknita, D., Vitaro, F., Tremblay, R., Cote, G. & Hodgins, S. (2017). Childhood predictors of adult psychopathy scores among males followed from age 6 to 33. Journal of criminal justice, 53, 55-65
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Childhood predictors of adult psychopathy scores among males followed from age 6 to 33
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2017 (English)In: Journal of criminal justice, ISSN 0047-2352, E-ISSN 1873-6203, Vol. 53, p. 55-65Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: Psychopathic traits are associated with multiple negative outcomes. The present prospective, longitudinal study identified associations of childhood factors with adult psychopathy scores.

 Methods: 311 men, aged, on average, 33 years, were assessed using the Psychopathy Checklist-Revised (PCL-R). Predictors included neighbourhood deprivation, parents' characteristics, teacher ratings of behaviour at ages 6, 10 and 12, and academic performance at age 12. Hierarchical linear regression models were computed to identify predictors at different ages of PCL-R total and facet scores. 

Results: Age 33 PCL-R total and facet scores were significantly, and independently, associated with father's and mother's criminality and mother's age at participant's birth when teacher ratings of childhood behaviours and mathematics marks were included in the models. Anxiety was negatively associated with facet 1 scores at age 6. At age 12, 22% of the variance in facet 2 scores was predicted by father's violent convictions, mother's age and criminal charges, and reactive aggression. Facet 3 scores were associated with mother's age (marginally), inattention, and reactive aggression. Facet 4 scores were associated with father's violent criminality, mother's age, conduct probleins, inattention, and reactive aggression. 

Conclusion: Etiological research and prevention programs should focus on antecedents of psychopathic traits present in early childhood.

National Category
Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-37368 (URN)10.1016/j.jcrimjus.2017.09.003 (DOI)000415141200006 ()
Available from: 2017-11-30 Created: 2017-11-30 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
Asp, M., Simonsson, B., Peter, L. & Molarius, A. (2017). Physical mobility, physical activity, and obesity among elderly: findings from a large population-based Swedish survey. Public Health, 147, 84-91
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Physical mobility, physical activity, and obesity among elderly: findings from a large population-based Swedish survey
2017 (English)In: Public Health, ISSN 0033-3506, E-ISSN 1476-5616, Vol. 147, p. 84-91Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To examine how physical activity and physical mobility are related to obesity in the elderly. Study design: A cross-sectional study of 2558 men and women aged 65 years and older who participated in a population survey in 2012 was conducted in mid-Sweden with an overall response rate of 67%. Methods: Obesity (body mass index >= 30 kg/m(2)) was based on self-reported weight and height, and physical activity and physical mobility on questionnaire data. Chi-squared test and multiple logistic regressions were used as statistical analyses. Results: The overall prevalence of obesity was 19% in women and 15% in men and decreased after the age of 75 years. A strong association between both physical activity and obesity, and physical mobility and obesity was found. The odds for obesity were higher for impaired physical mobility (odds ratio [OR] 2.83, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.14-3.75) than for physical inactivity (OR 1.63, 95% CI 1.28-2.08) when adjusted for gender, age, socio-economic status and fruit and vegetable intake. However, physical activity was associated with obesity only among elderly with physical mobility but not among those with impaired physical mobility. Conclusion: It is important to focus on making it easier for elderly with physical mobility to become or stay physically active, whereas elderly with impaired physical mobility have a higher prevalence of obesity irrespective of physical activity.

National Category
Geriatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-36248 (URN)10.1016/j.puhe.2017.01.032 (DOI)000405833500015 ()28404503 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85015448492 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-08-17 Created: 2017-08-17 Last updated: 2018-10-16Bibliographically approved
Peter, L., Åslund, C. & Nilsson, K. W. (2017). The role of online social network chatting for alcohol use in adolescence: Testing three peer-related pathways in a Swedish population-based sample. Computers in human behavior, 71, 284-290
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The role of online social network chatting for alcohol use in adolescence: Testing three peer-related pathways in a Swedish population-based sample
2017 (English)In: Computers in human behavior, ISSN 0747-5632, E-ISSN 1873-7692, Vol. 71, p. 284-290Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of the study was to examine whether online social network chatting (OSNC) is related to any of three peer-related pathways to alcohol use among adolescents including a stress-exposure pathway, a peer status pathway and a social context pathway. A survey was distributed to a Swedish population-based sample of 2439 boys and girls 15–16 years old enrolled in the 9th grade of primary school. Indirect effects, moderating effects, and gender differences were analysed. The results exposed a robust positive association between OSNC and alcohol use, but also that OSNC accounted for one-fifth of the association between the peer status pathway and alcohol use. A positive association between the stress-exposure pathway and alcohol use was found that was weaker among adolescents who scored high on OSNC whereas a positive association between the social context pathway and alcohol use also was found that was stronger among adolescents who scored high on OSNC. Consequently, OSNC may contribute differently to alcohol use depending on which peer-related pathway that the adolescent follows. The robust positive association between OSNC and alcohol use that remained when the three peer-related pathways were accounted for also indicates that this association is accounted for by other factors. 

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-34955 (URN)10.1016/j.chb.2017.02.012 (DOI)000399511000030 ()2-s2.0-85012066263 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-02-23 Created: 2017-02-23 Last updated: 2017-10-16Bibliographically approved
Larm, P., Åslund, C., Starrin, B. & Nilsson, K. W. (2016). How are social capital and sense of coherence associated with hazardous alcohol use?: Findings from a large population-based Swedish sample of adults. Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, 44(5), 525-533
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How are social capital and sense of coherence associated with hazardous alcohol use?: Findings from a large population-based Swedish sample of adults
2016 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 44, no 5, p. 525-533Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims: This study examined whether social capital and a sense of coherence are associated with hazardous alcohol use in a large population-based Swedish sample. In particular, the objectives were (a) to examine which of five subdimensions of social capital is associated with hazardous alcohol use, (b) to investigate the moderating role of sense of coherence and (c) to examine possible sex differences. Methods: A postal survey was distributed to a sample of respondents (aged 18-84 years) from five Swedish counties that was stratified by sex, age and city; 40,674 (59.2%) participants responded, of which 45.5% were men and 54.5% were women with a mean±SD age of 53.8±17.9 years. Results: Structural dimensions of social capital were associated with an increased probability of hazardous alcohol use among both men and women, whereas the increased probability associated with cognitive dimensions occurred mostly among women. Sense of coherence was robustly associated with a decreased probability of hazardous alcohol use among both men and women. There were few moderating effects of sense of coherence and sex differences emerged mainly for the cognitive dimension of social capital. Conclusions: Associations between social capital dimensions and hazardous alcohol use were partly sex-specific, whereas the benefits of a sense of coherence accrued to both sexes. Social capital dimensions and sense of coherence were generally unrelated to each other. Only associations between the cognitive dimensions of social capital and hazardous alcohol use differed by sex.

Keywords
hazardous alcohol use, sense of coherence, sex differences, social capital, Sweden
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-32011 (URN)10.1177/1403494816645221 (DOI)000377349500010 ()27113963 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84971449083 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-06-16 Created: 2016-06-16 Last updated: 2018-10-16Bibliographically approved
Åslund, C., Larm, P., Starrin, B. & Nilsson, K. W. (2014). The buffering effect of tangible social support on financial stress: Influence on psychological well-being and psychosomatic symptoms in a large sample of the adult general population. International Journal for Equity in Health, 13(1), Article number 85
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The buffering effect of tangible social support on financial stress: Influence on psychological well-being and psychosomatic symptoms in a large sample of the adult general population
2014 (English)In: International Journal for Equity in Health, ISSN 1475-9276, E-ISSN 1475-9276, Vol. 13, no 1, p. Article number 85-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Conclusions: Social support had its strongest effect at high levels of financial stress. The question whether the altering of our social networks may improve physical health is important for the prevention of ill health in people experiencing financial stress. Strengthening social networks may have the potential to influence health-care costs and improve quality of life. Introduction. Financial stress is an important source of distress and is related to poor mental and physical health outcomes. The present study investigated whether tangible social support could buffer the effect of financial stress on psychological and psychosomatic health. Results: Individuals with high financial stress and low tangible social support had six to seven times increased odds ratios for low psychological well-being and many psychosomatic symptoms. By contrast, individuals with high financial stress and high tangible social support had only two to three times increased odds ratios for low psychological well-being and three to four times increased odds ratios for many psychosomatic symptoms, suggesting a buffering effect of tangible social support. Consistent with the buffering hypothesis, there were significant interactions between financial stress and social support, particularly in relation to low psychological well-being.

Keywords
Buffering effect, Economic stress, Public health, Self-rated health, Social support
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-26153 (URN)10.1186/s12939-014-0085-3 (DOI)000345537100001 ()2-s2.0-84907802264 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2014-10-22 Created: 2014-10-22 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Hodgins, S., Larm, P., Ellenbogen, M., Vitaro, F. & Tremblay, R. E. (2013). Teachers' ratings of childhood behaviours predict adolescent and adult crime among 3016 males and females. Canadian journal of psychiatry, 58(3), 143-150
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Teachers' ratings of childhood behaviours predict adolescent and adult crime among 3016 males and females
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2013 (English)In: Canadian journal of psychiatry, ISSN 0706-7437, Vol. 58, no 3, p. 143-150Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To examine associations of teacher-rated conduct problems (CP) and hurtful and uncaring behaviours (HUB) at age 6 and 10 with criminal convictions up to age 24 among 1593 males and 1423 females, and to determine whether aggressive behaviour at age 12 mediated the associations of CP and HUB with criminal convictions. Method: Teachers assessed HUB and CP at ages 6 and 10 and ratings above the 90th percentile at each age and within each sex were used to assign participants to 1 of 4 groups. Teachers assessed proactive, reactive, indirect, and verbal aggression at age 12. Juvenile and adult criminal records were obtained. Results: High CP and HUB males, aged 6, were 4 times more likely than males with lower ratings to acquire convictions for violent crimes and 5 times more likely to acquire convictions for nonviolent crimes by age 24. High HUB and CP females, aged 6, were 5 times more likely than females with lower ratings to have a conviction for a nonviolent offence by age 24. Among males, both aged 6 and 10, high HUB without CP were associated with elevations at risk of convictions for violent and nonviolent crimes, while among females the elevations at risk were limited to convictions for nonviolent crimes. Different types of aggressive behaviour mediated associations of high HUB and CP with subsequent criminal convictions, but not the association of HUB without CP and crime. Conclusions: Teachers in elementary schools rated behaviours that, from age 6 onward, significantly predicted criminal convictions into early adulthood.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-23872 (URN)000316928200004 ()2-s2.0-84875986931 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2013-12-19 Created: 2013-12-19 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-3452-7260

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