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Crevani, L. & Cozza, M. (2018). COMPLEMENTARY REPRESENTATIONAL PRACTICES FOR ARTICULATING MATTERS OF CONCERN. In: PIN-C: the 5 th Participatory Innovation Conference: . Paper presented at PIN-C: the 5 th Participatory Innovation Conference.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>COMPLEMENTARY REPRESENTATIONAL PRACTICES FOR ARTICULATING MATTERS OF CONCERN
2018 (English)In: PIN-C: the 5 th Participatory Innovation Conference, 2018Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Matters of concern can be defined as complicated, engaging, diverse, fragile, and situated issue for which we care. Researchers can contribute to articulating them. In this paper, we discuss one methodological aspect that influences the articulation of matters of concern by applying a participatory design approach. By referring to workshops organized for studying the introduction of welfare technology for older people, we argue that combining different representational practices both enables and constrains the participants’ agency. Enabling and constraining depends on the performativity of the sociomateriality of the practice of method and the analysis of such aspects lead to the articulation of matters of concern.

Keywords
matter of concern, representation, representational practice
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Industrial Economics and Organisations
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-37435 (URN)
Conference
PIN-C: the 5 th Participatory Innovation Conference
Projects
SInSHV3D
Funder
VINNOVA, 2016-03170
Available from: 2017-12-10 Created: 2017-12-10 Last updated: 2018-05-28Bibliographically approved
Andersson, C., Cozza, M., Crevani, L. & Schunnesson, J. (2018). Infrastructuring for remote night monitoring: Frictions in striving for transparency when digitalising care service. In: Proceedings of the 16th European Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work: Exploratory Papers, Reports of the European Society for Socially Embedded Technologies. Paper presented at ECSCW 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Infrastructuring for remote night monitoring: Frictions in striving for transparency when digitalising care service
2018 (English)In: Proceedings of the 16th European Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work: Exploratory Papers, Reports of the European Society for Socially Embedded Technologies, 2018Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The question of how to organise for the introduction of a new service involving the interaction of humans and technologies is both crucial and challenging. Convergence between the community of practice using the technology and the design of the technology is crucial for the technology to become meaningful and usable. While processes of convergence are challenging in themselves, they become more complex if several communities of practice are going to use and collaborate around/through the technology. The co-presence of different communities of practice is a common situation when delivering public welfare services. In particular, the development of welfare technology is a context rich in potential frictions, making convergence challenging. By mobilising the concept of transparency, we analyse the process of implementation of remote night monitoring and highlight how transparency is related to different aspects. Such analysis reveals that processes of convergence are related in this context not only to frictions shared with other settings, but also to specific frictions related to matters of concern in welfare services. This leads us to discuss whether digitalised care services can be argued as still having a human side or not.

Keywords
infrastructuring, transparency, home-care, welfare technology
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Industrial Economics and Organisations
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-39044 (URN)
Conference
ECSCW 2018
Projects
SInSHV3DDigMa
Funder
VINNOVA, 2016-03170
Available from: 2018-04-19 Created: 2018-04-19 Last updated: 2018-05-28
Crevani, L. (2018). Is there leadership in a fluid world?: Exploring the ongoing production of direction in organizing. Leadership, 4(1), 83-109
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Is there leadership in a fluid world?: Exploring the ongoing production of direction in organizing
2018 (English)In: Leadership, ISSN 1742-7150, E-ISSN 1742-7169, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 83-109Article in journal (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Although the idea of leadership being a process is clearly stated in leadership definitions, most researchers focus on individuals rather than observing and studying processes. This contradiction has been highlighted by a number of scholars turning to leadership processes and practices, thereby drawing attention to the interactional and social aspects of the phenomenon. Such contributions mostly take process perspectives in which entities still play an important role. In this article, I therefore aim at contributing to leadership studies based on a process ontology by exploring one central aspect of leadership work, the production of direction, processually. I do so by building on geographer Massey’s conception of space, thus adding a spatial dimension that enables me to conceptualize direction as the development of an evolving relational configuration. In order to empirically explore such a conceptualization, two constructs are proposed: the construction of positions and the construction of issues. The reading of leadership work thus produced leads me to suggest ‘clearing for action’ as a means of conveying the spatio-temporal and constructive (reality constructing) character of leadership work.

Keywords
relational leadership, Leadership work, process ontology, space, talk and leadership, space of action, leadership practice, positions, issues, direction, positioning
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Industrial Economics and Organisations
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-30035 (URN)10.1177/1742715015616667 (DOI)000424656400005 ()2-s2.0-85041820449 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-12-18 Created: 2015-12-18 Last updated: 2018-02-28Bibliographically approved
Crevani, L. & Endrissat, N. (2018). New furniture, but no new spirit: When collaborative workspaces don’t work (as planned). In: : . Paper presented at the 2nd RGCS Symposium, 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>New furniture, but no new spirit: When collaborative workspaces don’t work (as planned)
2018 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Industrial Economics and Organisations
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-37514 (URN)
Conference
the 2nd RGCS Symposium, 2018
Available from: 2017-12-20 Created: 2017-12-20 Last updated: 2017-12-22Bibliographically approved
Hallin, A., Crevani, L., Ivory, C. & Mörndal, M. (2017). Digitalisation and work: Sociomaterial entanglements in steel production. In: : . Paper presented at NFF, Nordisk företagsekonomisk förening, Bodø, Norge.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Digitalisation and work: Sociomaterial entanglements in steel production
2017 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The purpose of this paper is to theorize how different sociomaterial entanglements affect work practices. Based on a qualitative case study, we compare and contrast three empirical Factory-cases; the Non-digital-and-non-lean factory; the Somewhat-digital-and-lean factory; and the More-thoroughly-digital-factory. When comparing these three cases, we are able to show that the different sociomaterial entanglements enact different spheres of concern. The contribution of the paper lies in its’ unveiling of how the spheres of concern differ in terms of temporal orientation and localization, and depending on the entanglement of technologies and production management models. 

Keywords
sociomaterial, entanglement, matter of concern, digitalization
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-37515 (URN)
Conference
NFF, Nordisk företagsekonomisk förening, Bodø, Norge
Projects
Digitized management – what can we learn from England and Sweden?
Funder
VINNOVA, 2016-05073
Available from: 2017-12-20 Created: 2017-12-20 Last updated: 2017-12-22Bibliographically approved
Cozza, M. & Crevani, L. (2017). Panel on "Ageing and Technologies". In: : . Paper presented at The International Society for Information Studies Summit 2017.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Panel on "Ageing and Technologies"
2017 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Keywords
Ageing; Interdisciplinary
National Category
Engineering and Technology Computer and Information Sciences
Research subject
Industrial Economics and Organisations
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-34908 (URN)
Conference
The International Society for Information Studies Summit 2017
Projects
HV3D; SInS
Funder
VINNOVA
Available from: 2017-02-17 Created: 2017-02-17 Last updated: 2018-05-28Bibliographically approved
Crevani, L. & Hallin, A. (2017). Performative narcissism: When organizations are made successful, admirable, and unique through narcissistic work. Management Learning, 48(4), 431-452
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Performative narcissism: When organizations are made successful, admirable, and unique through narcissistic work
2017 (English)In: Management Learning, ISSN 1350-5076, E-ISSN 1461-7307, Vol. 48, no 4, p. 431-452Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Dramatic stories of corporate crises appear in newspapers and magazines all over the world; one explanation offered by scholars has been that the affected organization suffered (literally) from narcissism. As responsible, ethical, non-narcissistic behavior is claimed to be crucial for management, the purpose of this article is to advance our knowledge about narcissism in organizations by developing an understanding of which organizational work enacts organizations as successful, admired, and unique. The dominant use of narcissism as a pathological condition limits the possibility to learn about organizing processes since it provides simplistic explanations. By introducing the notion of performative narcissism, we re-focus attention from the pathological condition of organizations to potentially pervasive organizational practices. Thus, we see that narcissistic work is a sociomaterial process not limited to organizational borders, but connecting and enrolling people, artifacts, animals, and places into mutually dependent, shifting, and composite assemblages that emerge through practices reproducing the organization as successful and unique.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SAGE Publications Ltd, 2017
Keywords
Expressive organization, narcissistic work, organizational narcissism, performative narcissism, performativity, sociomaterial
National Category
Other Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-36296 (URN)10.1177/1350507617692295 (DOI)000407907100004 ()2-s2.0-85027841741 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-08-31 Created: 2017-08-31 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
Crevani, L. & Endrissat, N. (2016). Mapping the Leadership-as-Practice Terrain: Comparative elements. In: Raelin (Ed.), Leadership‐as‐Practice: Theory and Application. Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mapping the Leadership-as-Practice Terrain: Comparative elements
2016 (English)In: Leadership‐as‐Practice: Theory and Application / [ed] Raelin, Routledge, 2016Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Inspired by the practice turn in organization and social theory (Schatzki et al., 2001), there has been increasing recognition of the value of theorizing about and studying leadership from a practice perspective (Denis et al., 2005, 2010; Carroll et al., 2008; Crevani et al., 2010; Raelin, 2011; Endrissat & von Arx, 2013). The resulting notion of “leadership-as-practice” gives rise to high expectations but may also cause misunderstandings among leadership scholars and practitioners alike. To recognize its potential we believe it is important to bring to the fore some of its underlying assumptions and outline its similarities and differences to other relatively close concepts. Hence, this chapter provides an introduction to the leadership-as-practice perspective by means of two central comparisons. First, we probe into leadership studies and consider the similarities and differences of a leadership-as-practice perspective with related leadership approaches such as the leadership style approach (and the subsequent situational leadership and contingency models) and the relational leadership approach. We highlight the consequences of doing research from each one of these three perspectives, mainly with respect to the underlying understanding of reality (ontology) and, consequently, the “unit of analysis” (i.e. what is studied and focused on to produce knowledge about leadership). We include examples of typical research questions and exemplary studies in each of the three domains to support our reasoning. Of course, the comparison cannot be completed by considering just two other approaches. However, the two seem most relevant because they share several similarities with the leadership-as-practice approach that need closer examination to define the specific contribution of leadership-as-practice. The style (and the situational/contingency) approach is widely known, entitative in character, but with a similar focus on leadership actions to the practice approach. By making the differences between the two approaches explicit, we hope to inspire the broad range of scholars familiar with the style approach to consider the practice perspective as a potential alternative that allows them to enrich understanding of the accomplishments of leadership. The relational approach, on the other hand, is the closest to the practice approach, and this is sometimes even used synonymously. However, differences exist and we believe that it is important to make them explicit to better understand the critical contribution of leadership-as-practice.

In the second comparison we look outside leadership studies and focus instead on the “as-practice” approach, outlining the similarities and differences between leadership-as-practice and other practice approaches in organization studies, namely strategy-as-practice and coordination-as-practice. As we will show, although the underlying assumptions are the same, they differ with respect to the social accomplishment on which they focus, that is the consequences of organizing processes that they try to explain and understand. Because of space restrictions, we had to limit our comparison to those organizational phenomena that we consider most relevant for defining leadership-as-practice. Both coordination and strategy work share similarities with leadership that sometimes make it difficult to distinguish among them. We hope that the focus on ‘social accomplishment’ will help the reader to better understand what the unique contribution of each of these organizational constructs is.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2016
Keywords
leadership as practice, relational leadership, strategy as practice, practice studies
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-28963 (URN)10.4324/9781315684123 (DOI)2-s2.0-84967387170 (Scopus ID)978-1-13-892486-4 (ISBN)
Available from: 2015-09-21 Created: 2015-09-21 Last updated: 2016-05-26Bibliographically approved
Hallin, A. & Crevani, L. (2015). Introducing the multi-spatial study. In: : . Paper presented at APROS, Sydney, Dec 8-11, 2015.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Introducing the multi-spatial study
2015 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Industrial Economics and Organisations
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-30906 (URN)
Conference
APROS, Sydney, Dec 8-11, 2015
Available from: 2016-01-30 Created: 2016-01-30 Last updated: 2016-04-21Bibliographically approved
Crevani, L., Ekman, M., Lindgren, M. & Packendorff, J. (2015). Leadership cultures and discursive hybridisation: On the cultural production of leadership in higher education reforms. International Journal of Public Leadership, 11(3/4), 147-165
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Leadership cultures and discursive hybridisation: On the cultural production of leadership in higher education reforms
2015 (English)In: International Journal of Public Leadership, ISSN 2056-4929, Vol. 11, no 3/4, p. 147-165Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the concept of leadership culture and analyse how leadership cultures are produced in higher education reforms, in a hybridised discursive context of traditional academic values and emerging managerialism and leaderism.

Design/methodology/approach: Building on a perspective on leadership as a cultural phenomenon emerging in processes in which societal, sectorial and professional discursive resources are invoked, this study adds to earlier studies on how notions of leadership are involved in the transformation of higher education organisations. To this end, the method combines a traditional qualitative study of change initiatives over a long period of time with participative observation. Focusing on two vignettes, the analysis centres on how several discursive resources are drawn upon in daily interaction.

Findings: The emergence of hybrid leadership cultures in which several discursive resources are drawn upon in daily interaction is illustrated. This paper emphasises how hybrid cultures develop through confirmation, re-formulation and rejection of discursive influences.

Research limitations/implications: An extended empirical material would enable further understanding of what cultural constructions of leadership that become confirmed, re-formulated or rejected. International comparisons would also enrich the analysis.

Practical implications: This paper may influence leadership, leadership development and change initiatives in higher education organization.

Social implications: Higher education organizations are crucial for societal development and this paper contributes to better understanding how they are changing.

Originality/value: The perspective proposed builds on recent developments in leadership studies and expands the means for focusing on social processes rather than individuals.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2015
Keywords
leadership culture, hybridization, higher education organization
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Industrial Economics and Organisations
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-29809 (URN)10.1108/IJPL-08-2015-0019 (DOI)000215245300002 ()
Available from: 2015-11-29 Created: 2015-11-29 Last updated: 2018-01-22Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-2294-7898

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