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Johansson, Ann-ChristinORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-7157-7259
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Publications (10 of 28) Show all publications
Arkkukangas, M., Söderlund, A., Eriksson, S. & Johansson, A.-C. (2019). Fall Preventive Exercise with or without behavior change support for community-dwelling older adults: A Randomized Controlled Trial With Short-Term Follow-up.. Journal of Geriatric Physical Therapy, 42(1), 9-17
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fall Preventive Exercise with or without behavior change support for community-dwelling older adults: A Randomized Controlled Trial With Short-Term Follow-up.
2019 (English)In: Journal of Geriatric Physical Therapy, ISSN 1539-8412, E-ISSN 2152-0895, Vol. 42, no 1, p. 9-17Article in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Health Sciences
Research subject
Care Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-34994 (URN)10.1519/JPT.0000000000000129 (DOI)000457564600002 ()28244890 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85051527684 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-03-03 Created: 2017-03-03 Last updated: 2019-03-29Bibliographically approved
Ehn, M., Johansson, A.-C. & Revenäs, Å. (2019). Technology-Based Motivation Support for Seniors' Physical Activity-A Qualitative Study on Seniors' and Health Care Professionals' Views. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 16(13)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Technology-Based Motivation Support for Seniors' Physical Activity-A Qualitative Study on Seniors' and Health Care Professionals' Views
2019 (English)In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 16, no 13Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper investigates seniors' and health care professionals' (HCPs) perceptions on needed contributions and qualities of digital technology-based motivation support for seniors' physical activity (PA). Seniors and HCPs expressed their views in focus groups, which were analyzed separately by inductive content analysis. Similarities and differences in seniors' and HCPs' views were identified through thematic analysis of qualitative results from both focus groups. This article's main findings are that both seniors and HCPs believed digital technology should support and make PA more enjoyable in ways to strengthen seniors' control and well-being. However, seniors emphasized support for social interaction, while HCPs also requested support for increasing seniors' insight into PA and for facilitating their dialogue with seniors. Conclusions to be drawn are that seniors and HPCs shared overall views on digital technology's main contributions but had different perspectives on how those contributions could be obtained. This highlights the importance of the early identification of user groups and exploration of their different needs when developing new solutions. Moreover, seniors' and HCPs' perceptions included aspects relevant for personal motivation, technology acceptance, and PA behavioral change according to self-determination theory, unified theory of acceptance and use of technology, and behavioral change techniques for increasing PA.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
NLM (Medline), 2019
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-44967 (URN)10.3390/ijerph16132418 (DOI)000477037900161 ()31288398 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85069561158 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-08-08 Created: 2019-08-08 Last updated: 2019-08-15Bibliographically approved
Ehn, M., Carlén Eriksson, L., Åkerberg, N. & Johansson, A.-C. (2018). Activity Monitors as Support for Older Persons’ Physical Activity in Daily Life: Qualitative Study of the Users’ Experiences. JMIR mhealth and uhealth, 6(2), Article ID e34.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Activity Monitors as Support for Older Persons’ Physical Activity in Daily Life: Qualitative Study of the Users’ Experiences
2018 (English)In: JMIR mhealth and uhealth, E-ISSN 2291-5222, Vol. 6, no 2, article id e34Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

Falls are a major threat to the health and independence of seniors. Regular physical activity (PA) can prevent 40% of all fall injuries. The challenge is to motivate and support seniors to be physically active. Persuasive systems can constitute valuable support for persons aiming at establishing and maintaining healthy habits. However, these systems need to support effective behavior change techniques (BCTs) for increasing older adults’ PA and meet the senior users’ requirements and preferences. Therefore, involving users as codesigners of new systems can be fruitful. Prestudies of the user’s experience with similar solutions can facilitate future user-centered design of novel persuasive systems.

Objective

The aim of this study was to investigate how seniors experience using activity monitors (AMs) as support for PA in daily life. The addressed research questions are as follows: (1) What are the overall experiences of senior persons, of different age and balance function, in using wearable AMs in daily life?; (2) Which aspects did the users perceive relevant to make the measurements as meaningful and useful in the long-term perspective?; and (3) What needs and requirements did the users perceive as more relevant for the activity monitors to be useful in a long-term perspective?

Methods

This qualitative interview study included 8 community-dwelling older adults (median age: 83 years). The participants’ experiences in using two commercial AMs together with tablet-based apps for 9 days were investigated. Activity diaries during the usage and interviews after the usage were exploited to gather user experience. Comments in diaries were summarized, and interviews were analyzed by inductive content analysis.

Results

The users (n=8) perceived that, by using the AMs, their awareness of own PA had increased. However, the AMs’ impact on the users’ motivation for PA and activity behavior varied between participants. The diaries showed that self-estimated physical effort varied between participants and varied for each individual over time. Additionally, participants reported different types of accomplished activities; talking walks was most frequently reported. To be meaningful, measurements need to provide the user with a reliable receipt of whether his or her current activity behavior is sufficient for reaching an activity goal. Moreover, praise when reaching a goal was described as motivating feedback. To be useful, the devices must be easy to handle. In this study, the users perceived wearables as easy to handle, whereas tablets were perceived difficult to maneuver. Users reported in the diaries that the devices had been functional 78% (58/74) of the total test days.

Conclusions

Activity monitors can be valuable for supporting seniors’ PA. However, the potential of the solutions for a broader group of seniors can significantly be increased. Areas of improvement include reliability, usability, and content supporting effective BCTs with respect to increasing older adults’ PA.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sweden: , 2018
National Category
Medical Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-38640 (URN)10.2196/mhealth.8345 (DOI)000426415800015 ()29391342 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85060370331 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Investigation of needs and requirements related to monitoring of physical activity in daily life: A qualitative study of older adults' experiences from using activity bracelets
Available from: 2018-03-02 Created: 2018-03-02 Last updated: 2019-06-18Bibliographically approved
Tuvemo Johnson, S., Martin, C., Anens, E., Johansson, A.-C. & Hellström, K. (2018). Older Adults’ Opinions on Fall Prevention in Relation to Physical Activity Level. Journal of Applied Gerontology, 37(1), 53-78
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Older Adults’ Opinions on Fall Prevention in Relation to Physical Activity Level
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2018 (English)In: Journal of Applied Gerontology, ISSN 0733-4648, E-ISSN 1552-4523, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 53-78Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The purpose of this study was to explore and describe older adults’opinions regarding actions to prevent falls and to analyze differences in theopinions of highly versus less physically active older adults. An open-endedquestion was answered by 262 individuals aged 75 to 98 years living in thecommunity. The answers were analyzed using qualitative content analysis,and differences in the categories were compared between highly and lessphysically active persons. Physical activity was measured according to afive-level scale. The content analysis resulted in eight categories: assistivedevices, avoiding hazards, behavioral adaptive strategies, being physicallyactive, healthy lifestyle, indoor modifications, outdoor modifications, andseeking assistance. Behavioral adaptive strategies were mentioned to agreater extent by highly active people, and indoor modifications were moreoften mentioned by less active older adults. Support for active self-directedbehavioral strategies might be important for fall prevention among lessphysically active older adults.

National Category
Other Medical Sciences not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-30674 (URN)10.1177/0733464815624776 (DOI)000417697100005 ()26769824 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85047836866 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-01-04 Created: 2018-01-22 Last updated: 2018-11-28Bibliographically approved
Arkkukangas, M., Söderlund, A., Eriksson, S. & Johansson, A.-C. (2018). One-Year Adherence to the Otago Exercise Program With or Without Motivational Interviewing in Community-Dwelling Older Adults. Journal of Aging and Physical Activity, 26(3), 390-395
Open this publication in new window or tab >>One-Year Adherence to the Otago Exercise Program With or Without Motivational Interviewing in Community-Dwelling Older Adults
2018 (English)In: Journal of Aging and Physical Activity, ISSN 1063-8652, E-ISSN 1543-267X, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 390-395Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study investigated if behavioral factors, treatment with behavioral support, readiness to change, fall self-efficacy, and activity habits could predict long-term adherence to an exercise program. Included in this study were 114 community-dwelling older adults who had participated in one of two home-based exercise interventions. Behavioral factors associated with adherence to the exercise program over 52 weeks were analyzed. The behavioral factors, specifically activity habits at baseline, significantly predicted adherence to the exercise program, with an odds ratio = 3.39, 95% confidence interval [1.38, 8.32], for exercise and an odds ratio = 6.11, 95% confidence interval [2.34, 15.94], for walks. Being allocated to a specific treatment including motivational interviewing was also significantly predictive: odds ratio = 2.47, 95% confidence interval [1.11, 5.49] for exercise adherence. In conclusion, activity habits and exercise in combination with motivational interviewing had a significant association with adherence to the exercise program at a 1-year follow-up.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
HUMAN KINETICS PUBL INC, 2018
Keywords
motivation, older adults, physical activity
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-40560 (URN)10.1123/japa.2017-0009 (DOI)000441464400005 ()28952864 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85035374926 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-08-30 Created: 2018-08-30 Last updated: 2019-01-04Bibliographically approved
Ehn, M., Derneborg, M., Ekström, M. & Johansson, A.-C. (2017). Inter- disciplinary and -sectorial cooperation for development of technology supporting behavioral change: Peer reviewed poster abstract. In: : . Paper presented at Persuasive Technology XII, 2017 (Pers Tech 2017), Amsterdam.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Inter- disciplinary and -sectorial cooperation for development of technology supporting behavioral change: Peer reviewed poster abstract
2017 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Other academic)
National Category
Other Engineering and Technologies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-37484 (URN)
Conference
Persuasive Technology XII, 2017 (Pers Tech 2017), Amsterdam
Projects
Technology support for health promotive behavioural change
Available from: 2017-12-20 Created: 2017-12-20 Last updated: 2017-12-20Bibliographically approved
Söderlund, A., Sandborgh, M. & Johansson, A.-C. (2017). Is self-efficacy and catastrophizing in pain-related disability mediated by control over pain and ability to decrease pain in whiplash-associated disorders?. Physiotherapy Theory and Practice, 33(5), 376-385
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Is self-efficacy and catastrophizing in pain-related disability mediated by control over pain and ability to decrease pain in whiplash-associated disorders?
2017 (English)In: Physiotherapy Theory and Practice, ISSN 0959-3985, E-ISSN 1532-5040, Vol. 33, no 5, p. 376-385Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Pain perception is influenced by several cognitive and behavioral factors of which some identified as mediators are important in pain management. We studied the mediating role of control over pain and ability to decrease pain in relation to functional self-efficacy, catastrophizing, and pain-related disability in patients with Whiplash-Associated Disorders, (WAD). Further, if the possible mediating impact differs over time from acute to three and 12 months after an accident, cross-sectional and prospective design was used, and 123 patients with WAD were included. Regression analyses were conducted to examine the mediating effect. The results showed that control over pain and ability to decrease pain were not mediators between self-efficacy, catastrophizing, and disability. Self-efficacy had a larger direct effect on pain-related disability compared to catastrophizing. Thus, healthcare staff should give priority to increase patients' self-efficacy, decrease catastrophic thinking, and have least focus on control over pain or ability to decrease pain.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
TAYLOR & FRANCIS INC, 2017
Keywords
Ability to decrease pain, catastrophizing, control over pain, self-efficacy, Whiplash-Associated Disorders
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-35793 (URN)10.1080/09593985.2017.1307890 (DOI)000402066300004 ()28398100 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85017420395 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-06-15 Created: 2017-06-15 Last updated: 2018-01-24Bibliographically approved
Arkkukangas, M., Sundler, A., Söderlund, A., Eriksson, S. & Johansson, A. C. (2017). Older persons’ experiences of a home-based exercise programme with behavioural change support. Physiotherapy Theory and Practice, 33(12), 905-913
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Older persons’ experiences of a home-based exercise programme with behavioural change support
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2017 (English)In: Physiotherapy Theory and Practice, ISSN 0959-3985, E-ISSN 1532-5040, Vol. 33, no 12, p. 905-913Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: It is a challenge to promote exercise among older persons. Knowledge is needed regarding the maintenance of exercise aiming at preventing falls and promoting health and wellbeing in older persons.

Purpose: This descriptive study used a qualitative inductive approach to describe older persons’ experiences of a fall-preventive, home-based exercise programme with support for behavioural change.

Methods: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with twelve older persons aged 75 years or older, and a qualitative content analysis was performed.

Results: Four categories emerged: facilitators of performing exercise in everyday life, the importance of support, perceived gains from exercise, and the existential aspects of exercise.

Conclusion: With support from physiotherapists, home-based exercise can be adapted to individual circumstances in a meaningful way. By including exercises in everyday life and daily routines could support the experience of being stronger, result in better physical functioning and give hope for an extended active life in old age.

National Category
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-35203 (URN)10.1080/09593985.2017.1359869 (DOI)000416020200002 ()28812402 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85027534558 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-04-19 Created: 2017-04-19 Last updated: 2019-01-15Bibliographically approved
Johansson, A.-C., Söderlund, A. & Öhrvik, J. (2016). Associations among pain, disability and psychosocial factors and the predictive value of expectations on returning to work in patients who undergo lumbar disc surgery.. European spine journal, 25(1), 296-203
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Associations among pain, disability and psychosocial factors and the predictive value of expectations on returning to work in patients who undergo lumbar disc surgery.
2016 (English)In: European spine journal, ISSN 0940-6719, E-ISSN 1432-0932, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 296-203Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The aim of this study was to describe the associations among pain, disability and psychosocial factors preoperatively as well as 3 and 24 months later for patients who undergo first time discectomy and to analyse the predictive value of psychosocial factors on the outcome 24 months after surgery.

METHODS:

Fifty-nine patients, 41 % women, with a mean age of 40 years and without comorbidities were included, of whom 56 responded to the 24-month follow-up; at that point, they were divided into patients with complaints (C, n = 36) and patients without complaints (NC, n = 20). Correlations among the pain intensity, disability and psychosocial factors were analysed preoperatively, 3 and 24 months after discectomy, and regression analyses of psychosocial factors on the outcome at 24 months were performed.

RESULTS:

Psychosocial variables were weakly correlated with the pain intensity and disability preoperatively. High expectations on the return to work were predictive of both pain intensity (β = 8.0, p = 0.03) and disability (β = 9.1, p < 0.001) at 24 months. Associations between psychosocial variables and outcome variables were strengthened at the 3-month follow-up in the C group, and this association remained 24 months after surgery. Fear of movement was most strongly correlated with leg pain intensity (r s 0.64, p < 0.001) and the ability to decrease pain was the most correlated with disability (r s 0.78, p < 0.001).

CONCLUSION:

Having high expectations on the return to work after surgery was the strongest predictor for a favourable outcome. Therefore, low preoperative expectations on return to work convey an important prognostic signal.

Keywords
Lumbar discectomy Psychosocial factors Patients´expectatons Coping strategies Pain Disability
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-30673 (URN)10.1007/s00586-015-3820-6 (DOI)000368608900037 ()25716659 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84958157712 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-01-04 Created: 2016-01-04 Last updated: 2019-01-28Bibliographically approved
Lindblad, K., Bergkvist, L. & Johansson, A.-C. (2016). Evaluation of the treatment of chronic chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy using long-wave diathermy and interferential currents: a randomisezed controlled trial. Supportive Care in Cancer, 24(6), 2523-2531
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evaluation of the treatment of chronic chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy using long-wave diathermy and interferential currents: a randomisezed controlled trial
2016 (English)In: Supportive Care in Cancer, ISSN 0941-4355, E-ISSN 1433-7339, Vol. 24, no 6, p. 2523-2531Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose. The purpose was to investigate the effects of long-wave diathermy in combination with interferential currents (interferential therapy and long-wave diathermy at high power (ITH)) in comparison with long-wave diathermy at a power below the active treatment dose (long-wave diathermy at low power (LDL), control group) on sensory and motor symptoms in patients with chronic chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) in the lower extremities.

Methods. Sixty-seven patients with chronic CIPN were randomized to 12 weeks of either ITH or LDL. Follow-up assessments were performed after the treatment period and at 37 weeks after randomization. The primary outcome was pain (Numeric Rating Scale (NRS)), and the secondary outcomes were discomfort, nerve symptoms, subjective measurement of dizziness (Dizziness Handicap Inventory), and balance. Differences within and between groups were analyzed.

Results. Pain intensity decreased significantly only in the LDL group directly after the treatment period from NRS median 25 to median 12.5 (P = 0.017). At the 37-week follow-up, no changes were detected, irrespective of group (NRS 13 vs. 20, P = 0.885). Discomfort decreased significantly in both groups at both 12 and 37 weeks after the baseline (P < 0.05). Balance disability showed significant declines in both groups at 12 and 37 weeks (P = 0.001/0.025 in the ITH group vs P = 0.001/<0.001 in the LDL group). Balance ability (tightened Romberg test) increased significantly at both 12 and 37 weeks in both groups (P = 0.004/<0.040 in the ITH group) but did not improve in the LDL group at any of the follow-up time points (P = 0.203 vs P = 0.383). The one-legged stance test was unchanged in the ITH group after 12 weeks but improved 37 weeks after baseline (P = 0.03). No significant changes were observed in the LDL group at any of the follow-up time points.

Conclusion. This study provides no support for the use of a combination of long-wave diathermy and ITH as a treatment option for patients with chronic CIPN. However, the chronic CIPN symptoms decreased with time irrespective of the treatment.

National Category
Clinical Medicine
Research subject
Care Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-30672 (URN)10.1007/s00520-015-3060-7 (DOI)000374983300017 ()26687020 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84973868389 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-01-04 Created: 2016-01-04 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-7157-7259

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