mdh.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 107) Show all publications
Yuwanich, N., Akhavan, S., Nantsupawat, W., Martin, L., Elfström, M. & Sandborgh, M. (2018). Development and psychometric properties of the stressor scale for emergency nurses. International Emergency Nursing, 39, 77-88
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Development and psychometric properties of the stressor scale for emergency nurses
Show others...
2018 (English)In: International Emergency Nursing, ISSN 1755-599X, E-ISSN 1878-013X, Vol. 39, p. 77-88Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Emergency department nurses are exposed to specific stressors and report higher stress levels than nurses in other hospital departments. This study aimed to develop and test the psychometric properties of a questionnaire-based instrument for identifying stressors for emergency department nurses. Methods: The instrument's content and face validities were examined by five experts and nurses in emergency nursing field. The test-retest reliability was examined on 30 emergency department nurses. The construct validity, including an exploratory and a confirmatory factor analysis, was tested on 405 emergency department nurses. Cronbach's alpha values and intra-class coefficients were calculated. Results: The instrument's content and face validities were satisfactory. The exploratory factor analysis provided a five-factor solution, whereas the confirmatory factor analysis provided a final four-factor solution with 25 items distributed among the factors Life and death situations, Patients' and families' actions and reactions, Technical and formal support, and Conflicts. The Cronbach's alpha values ranged from 0.89 to 0.93 per factor, and the intra-class correlation coefficient was 0.89, indicating good homogeneity and stability. Conclusions: The instrument's content, face, and construct validities were satisfactory, and the internal consistency and test-retest reliability were good. This instrument can be useful in the management of emergency departments.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER SCI LTD, 2018
Keywords
Emergency room nursing, Instrument development, Occupational stress, Questionnaire, Validation
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-40256 (URN)10.1016/j.ienj.2018.01.005 (DOI)000436593800012 ()29409734 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85041302081 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-07-19 Created: 2018-07-19 Last updated: 2018-09-14Bibliographically approved
Åkerlind, C., Martin, L. & Gustafsson, C. (2018). eHomecare and safety: The experiences of older patients and their relatives. Geriatric Nursing (2), 178-185
Open this publication in new window or tab >>eHomecare and safety: The experiences of older patients and their relatives
2018 (English)In: Geriatric Nursing, ISSN 0197-4572, E-ISSN 1528-3984, no 2, p. 178-185Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The study's aim was to extend descriptions of how older patients with granted eHomecare and their relatives understand safety, and further to describe how they experience safety in everyday life. The study was conducted in Sweden. The participants were 12 older patients who had been provided with eHomecare and 8 relatives. Data were collected by semi-structured individual interviews. A conceptual framework of safety was used and a qualitative content analysis was conducted in a deductive and an inductive phase. The deductive results are presented in predefined categories: perceived sense of safety, disturbance and threats, re-establishing safety, and new safety. The inductive analysis resulted in two main categories: safety as part of everyday life and eHomecare as safety. The results show that eHomecare can promote safety for older patients and their relatives. Existing doubts and ethical concerns about the service can be minimized by providing adequate information.

Keywords
eHomecare, information and communication technology, older patients, relatives, safety
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Health Sciences
Research subject
Care Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-36711 (URN)10.1016/j.gerinurse.2017.08.004 (DOI)000431606800008 ()28988833 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85030539695 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Doktorand projekt
Available from: 2017-10-10 Created: 2017-10-10 Last updated: 2018-12-14Bibliographically approved
Gusdal, A. K., Josefsson, K., Thors Adolfsson, E. & Martin, L. (2018). Family Health Conversations Conductedby Telephone in Heart Failure Nursing Care: A Feasibility Study. SAGE Open Nursing, 4, 1-13
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Family Health Conversations Conductedby Telephone in Heart Failure Nursing Care: A Feasibility Study
2018 (English)In: SAGE Open Nursing, Vol. 4, p. 1-13Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Registered nurses (RNs) in heart failure (HF) nursing care have a key role in providing family support, which positively affectsthe outcome for the patient. Telephone interventions conducted by RNs have been reported to be successful in HF nursingcare, but Family Health Conversations (FamHCs) involving the patient and the family, have not previously been tested. Thepurpose of the current study was to explore the experiences and feasibility of nurse-led FamHCs conducted by telephonewith patients and their family caregivers. A single-group intervention study with a pretest–posttest design was conducted inthree regional hospitals that had a nurse-led HF clinic. Five RNs, eight patients, and eight family caregivers participated. ThreeFamHCs were conducted by telephone with each family every 2 weeks. Qualitative and quantitative data were collectedthrough semistructured interviews and questionnaires. FamHCs improved the nurse–family relationships and relationshipswithin the families and provided RNs with new knowledge about the families. FamHCs conducted by telephone wereconsidered to be feasible for both families and RNs, although RNs preferred fewer and shorter FamHCs. The RNs preferredmeeting face-to-face with the families as nonverbal communication between the family members could be missed because oflack of visual input. On the other hand, RNs appreciated to focus entirely on the conversation without the need to performillness-related routine checks. In conclusion, the advantages of FamHCs conducted by telephone outweighed the disadvantages.Visual contact, provided by video telephony, and a shorter version of the tested FamHC would facilitate the use in HFnursing care.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SAGE Open, 2018
Keywords
advanced practice nurses, chronic illnesses, congenital heart disease, family nursing, heart failure, telenursing
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Care Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-41339 (URN)10.1177/2377960818803383 (DOI)000448061800001 ()
Available from: 2018-11-14 Created: 2018-11-14 Last updated: 2019-01-15Bibliographically approved
Johansson-Pajala, R.-M., Martin, L. & Jorsäter Blomgren, K. (2018). Registered nurses’ use of computerised decision support in medication reviews: Implications in Swedish nursing homes. International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, 31(6), 531-544
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Registered nurses’ use of computerised decision support in medication reviews: Implications in Swedish nursing homes
2018 (English)In: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, ISSN 0952-6862, E-ISSN 1758-6542, Vol. 31, no 6, p. 531-544Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the implications of registered nurses’ (RNs) use of a computerized decision support system (CDSS) in medication reviews. Design/methodology/approach: The paper employs a quasi-experimental, one-group pre-test/post-test design with three- and six-month follow-ups subsequent to the introduction of a CDSS. In total, 11 RNs initiated and prepared a total of 54 medication reviews. The outcome measures were the number of drug-related problems (DRPs) as reported by the CDSS and the RNs, respectively, the RNs’ views on the CDSS, and changes in the quality of drug treatment. Findings: The CDSS significantly indicated more DRPs than the RNs did, such as potential adverse drug reactions (ADRs). The RNs detected additional problems, outside the scope of the CDSS, such as lack of adherence. They considered the CDSS beneficial and wanted to continue using it. Only minor changes were found in the quality of drug treatments, with no significant changes in the drug-specific quality indicators (e.g. inappropriate drugs). However, the use of renally excreted drugs in reduced renal function decreased. Practical implications: The RNs’ use of a CDSS in medication reviews is of value in detecting potential ADRs and interactions. Yet, in order to have an impact on outcomes in the quality of drug treatment, further measures are needed. These may involve development of inter-professional collaboration, such as established procedures for the implementation of medication reviews, including the use of CDSS. Originality/value: This is, to the best of the authors’ knowledge, the first study to explore the implications of medication reviews, initiated and prepared by RNs who use a CDSS. The paper adds further insight into the RNs’ role in relation to quality of drug treatments.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Emerald Group Publishing Ltd., 2018
Keywords
Computerized decision support systems, Drug-related problem, Medication review, Nurse, Nursing home, Pharmacovigilance
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-40235 (URN)10.1108/IJHCQA-01-2017-0009 (DOI)000436807000009 ()2-s2.0-85049225913 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-07-12 Created: 2018-07-12 Last updated: 2018-07-19Bibliographically approved
Andersson, A. K., Martin, L., Strand Brodd, K. & Almqvist, L. (2017). Childrens and parents percpetions of everyday functioning in preschool children born preterm. In: : . Paper presented at P3M 2017 - Motives, methods, measures. CeDDR, Australian Catholic university, Melbourne, AUS, March 2017..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Childrens and parents percpetions of everyday functioning in preschool children born preterm
2017 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Health Sciences
Research subject
Care Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-36479 (URN)
Conference
P3M 2017 - Motives, methods, measures. CeDDR, Australian Catholic university, Melbourne, AUS, March 2017.
Available from: 2017-09-20 Created: 2017-09-20 Last updated: 2018-03-05Bibliographically approved
Ramsten, C., Marmstål Hammar, L., Martin, L. & Goransson, K. (2017). ICT and Intellectual Disability: A Survey of Organizational Support at the Municipal Level in Sweden. JARID: Journal of applied research in intellectual disabilities, 30(4), 705-713
Open this publication in new window or tab >>ICT and Intellectual Disability: A Survey of Organizational Support at the Municipal Level in Sweden
2017 (English)In: JARID: Journal of applied research in intellectual disabilities, ISSN 1360-2322, E-ISSN 1468-3148, Vol. 30, no 4, p. 705-713Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Young adults today have grown up in a society where information and communication technology (ICT) support empowerment and social participation. Young adults with mild-to-moderate intellectual disability are at risk for marginalization by the digital divide. The aim was to map and describe how municipal organizations in Sweden organize support in terms of policy and strategies to enable the use of ICT in social care for adults with a mild-to-moderate intellectual disability. MethodsA quantitative, cross-sectional survey including all municipalities in Sweden (n=290) was conducted (response rate: 51%, n=147). Descriptive statistics were used. Results: Findings indicate a lack of organizational support for staff as well as for young adults with mild-to-moderate intellectual disability. Conclusion: Municipalities request more knowledge about strategies for making ICT available. Despite the lack of comprehensive strategies for ICT, some Swedish municipalities have taken the initiative in this area.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY, 2017
Keywords
health and social policy, information and communication technology (ICT), intellectual disability, social care, young adults
National Category
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-35892 (URN)10.1111/jar.12265 (DOI)000402816500012 ()27271152 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84973547923 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-06-22 Created: 2017-06-22 Last updated: 2018-09-12Bibliographically approved
Gusdal, A. K., Josefsson, K., Thors Adolfsson, E. & Martin, L. (2017). Nurses’ Attitudes toward Family Importance in Heart Failure Care. European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, 16(3), 256-266
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nurses’ Attitudes toward Family Importance in Heart Failure Care
2017 (English)In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 256-266Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Support from the family positively affects self-management, patient outcomes and the incidence of hospitalizations among patients with heart failure (HF). To involve family members in HF care is thus valuable for the patients. Registered nurses (RNs) frequently meet family members to patients with HF and the quality of these encounters are likely to be influenced by the attitudes RNs hold toward families.

Aims: To explore RNs' attitudes toward the importance of families' involvement in HF nursing care and to identify factors that predict the most supportive attitudes.

Methods: Cross-sectional, multicentre web-survey study. A sample of 303 RNs from 47 hospitals and 30 primary health care centres (PHCC) completed the instrument Families’ Importance in Nursing Care - Nurses’ Attitudes.

Results: Overall, RNs were supportive of families' involvement. Nonetheless, attitudes toward inviting families to actively take part in HF nursing care and involve families in planning of care were less supportive. Factors predicting the most supportive attitudes were to work in a PHCC, a HF clinic, a workplace with a general approach toward families, to have a postgraduate specialization, education in cardiac and or HF nursing care, and a competence to work with families.

Conclusions: Experienced RNs in HF nursing care can be encouraged to mentor their younger and less experienced colleagues to strengthen their supportive attitudes toward families. RNs who have designated consultation time with patients and families, as in a nurse-led HF clinic, may have the most favourable condition for implementing a more supportive approach to families.

Keywords
Attitudes, family, heart failure, involvement, nursing, support, survey
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Care Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-34264 (URN)10.1177/1474515116687178 (DOI)000398178900010 ()28051331 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85012077015 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-12-16 Created: 2016-12-16 Last updated: 2018-10-16Bibliographically approved
Johansson-Pajala, R.-M., Gustafsson, L.-K., Jorsäter Blomgren, K., Fastbom, J. & Martin, L. (2017). Nurses' use of computerised decision support systems affects drug monitoring in nursing homes. Journal of Nursing Management, 25(1), 56-64
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nurses' use of computerised decision support systems affects drug monitoring in nursing homes
Show others...
2017 (English)In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 56-64Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: To describe variations in nurses' perceptions of using a computerised decision support system (CDSS) in drug monitoring. Background: There is an increasing focus on incorporating informatics into registered nurses' (RNs) clinical practice. Insight into RNs’ perceptions of using a CDSS in drug monitoring can provide a basis for further development of safer practices in drug management. Method: A qualitative interview study of 16 RNs. Data were analysed using a phenomenographic approach. Results: The RNs perceived a variety of aspects of using a CDSS indrug monitoring. Aspects of ‘time’ were evident, as was giving a ‘standardisation’ to the clinical work. There were perceptions of effects of obtained knowledge and ‘evidence’ and the division of ‘responsibilities’ between RNs and physicians of using the CDSS. Conclusion: The RNs perceived a CDSS as supportive in drug monitoring, in terms of promoting standardised routines, team-collaboration and providing possibilities for evidence-based clinical practice. Implications: Implementing a CDSS seems to be one feasible strategy to improve RNs’ preconditions for safe drug management. Nurse managers’ engagement and support in this process are vital for a successful result.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-34691 (URN)10.1111/jonm.12430 (DOI)000393687500007 ()27620980 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84994045637 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-01-23 Created: 2017-01-23 Last updated: 2018-10-16Bibliographically approved
Andersson, A. K., Martin, L., Strand Brodd, K. & Almqvist, L. (2017). Patterns of everyday functioning in preschool children born preterm and at term. Research in Developmental Disabilities, 67, 82-93
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Patterns of everyday functioning in preschool children born preterm and at term
2017 (English)In: Research in Developmental Disabilities, ISSN 0891-4222, E-ISSN 1873-3379, Vol. 67, p. 82-93Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background/Aim Children born preterm are at risk of neonatal complications but the long-term consequences for everyday functioning is not well known. The study aimed to identify patterns of everyday functioning in preschool children born preterm and at term in relation to perinatal data, neonatal risk factors, behaviour, and socioeconomic status. Registry data and data from parent rated questionnaires were collected for 331 children. Method A person-oriented approach with a cluster analysis was used. Results A seven cluster solution explained 65.91% of the variance. Most children (n = 232) showed patterns of strong everyday functioning. A minority of the children (n = 99), showed diverse patterns of weak everyday functioning. Perinatal characteristics, neonatal risk factors and socio-economics did not predict cluster group membership. Children born preterm were represented in all clusters. Conclusion, implications Most preschool children are perceived by their parents with strong everyday functioning despite being born preterm. However small groups of children are, for various reasons, perceived with weak functioning, but preterm birth is not the sole contributor to patterns of weak everyday functioning. More critical for all children's everyday functioning is probably the interaction between individual factors, behavioural factors and contextual factors. To gain a broader understanding of children's everyday functioning. Child Health Services need to systematically consider aspects of body function, activity and in addition participation and environmental aspects.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier Inc., 2017
Keywords
Child development, Children born preterm, Cluster analysis, Everyday functioning, Person-oriented research
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-36101 (URN)10.1016/j.ridd.2017.06.005 (DOI)000405975900009 ()28651224 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85021255293 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-07-12 Created: 2017-07-12 Last updated: 2018-10-25Bibliographically approved
Martin, L. (2017). Targeting modifiable risk factors in age-related macular degeneration in optometric practice in Sweden. Clinical Optometry, 9, 77-83
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Targeting modifiable risk factors in age-related macular degeneration in optometric practice in Sweden
2017 (English)In: Clinical Optometry, ISSN 1179-2752, Vol. 9, p. 77-83Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the extent to which ophthalmologists and optometrists in Sweden recommend the use of nutritional supplements, changes in diet, or smoking cessation to patients who are at risk of or with signs of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). In addition, this study also examined how these practitioners rate the strength of evidence for nutritional supplements in AMD management and which sources of information they consult to determine supplement recommendations for the prevention or treatment of AMD. Methods: This study implemented a cross-sectional design using data from a questionnaire. All Swedish optometrists and ophthalmologists who were registered in the membership databases of their respective professional organizations were invited to participate. The questionnaire contained 18 forced choice questions and one free text question and was organized into the following four sections: use of nutritional supplements, dietary advice, smoking and eye diseases, and strength of evidence and the sources of information regarding nutritional supplement interventions. Results: The response rate was 40.3% for optometrists and 5% for ophthalmologists. Optometrists were more likely than ophthalmologists to recommend nutritional supplements in AMD and provided significantly more advice about diet than did the ophthalmologists for both patients at risk for AMD and those with established disease. The ophthalmologists were more likely than the optometrists to rely on the findings from the age-related eye disease studies of AMD regarding treatment with and selection of supplements and to recommend smoking cessation. Conclusion: Common evidence-based strategies for AMD management among eye care professionals would presumably be beneficial for AMD patients. Targeted education and implementation strategies may be needed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
DOVE MEDICAL PRESS LTD, 2017
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mdh:diva-35357 (URN)10.2147/OPTO.S129942 (DOI)000399586000002 ()2-s2.0-85030229696 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-05-22 Created: 2017-05-22 Last updated: 2018-01-24Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-5976-5193

Search in DiVA

Show all publications